HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Simple tests could signal and prevent heart disease in women, says Pittsburgh researcher

PITTSBURGH, Nov. 7 A few safe and simple tests could identify and possibly prevent coronary heart disease in middle-aged women, according to findings reported by a University of Pittsburgh researcher at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions held Nov. 9-12 in Orlando, Fla.

"Most women gain one to two pounds per year as they approach and go through menopause, and a percentage of them will go on to develop heart disease as a result," said Lewis H. Kuller, M.D., professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. "Keeping one's waist circumference from expanding is a good way to avoid a negative outcome, but more targeted monitoring of other predictors, such as insulin, adiponectin and coronary calcium, can give a more accurate indication of when a woman is entering the danger zone."

Unlike the fat that accumulates at other points on the body, waistline fat surrounds the abdominal organs, setting off physiological changes that can lead to a variety of diseases and disabilities.

A percentage of women who gain waistline fat at middle age develop high levels of insulin, or insulin resistance, throwing off their bodies' delicate glucose metabolism and triggering in some the development of smaller and numerous low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, which can lead to the development of coronary calcium deposits. These deposits indicate risk of heart attack.

Dr. Kuller and his colleagues have found that monitoring a woman's condition through a few simple tests can signal when action should be taken to stop the cascade of events that could otherwise lead to heart attack. Insulin resistance can be measured by testing blood levels of insulin, glucose and adiponectin a type of fat-storing cell. Lipoprotein particles can be measured from a blood sample as well, and coronary calcium deposits can be discovered via electron beam tomography (EBT), a quick and non-invasive scan. If tests show
'"/>

Contact: Kathryn Duda
DudaK@upmc.edu
412-624-2607
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
11-Nov-2003


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Simple intervention encourages sun protection behaviors
2. Simple blood test may help to predict cardiovascular risk in older women
3. Simple question from your doctor can help identify your risk for breast cancer
4. Simple treatment could prevent many child malaria deaths
5. Simpler blood thinning medication effective for preventing blood clots and stroke
6. Simpler alphabet guidelines for treating acute coronary syndrome reduce risk
7. Simple sputum test for confirmation of childhood tuberculosis
8. Simple intervention nearly eliminates catheter-related bloodstream infections
9. Simple interventions for accident and emergency patients could help reduce excessive drinking
10. Simpler, cheaper way to make and fit prosthetics developed
11. Simple, easy acts in pregnancy and childbirth might protect against incontinence

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/17/2019)... ... July 17, 2019 , ... ... plans participating in Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, and Marketplace programs is pleased to announce ... Electronic Health Records (EHR) integration at the point of care to ...
(Date:7/17/2019)... ... ... It took just several small incisions by St. Luke's University Health Network ... under Amber Walck’s scalp, and suddenly her two-year agony with migraines was history. ... began without warning. About 39 million Americans suffer from migraines that range from ...
(Date:7/17/2019)... ... July 17, 2019 , ... Athena Software ... human services providers worldwide, has been awarded a California Multiple Award Schedules (CMAS) ... process for state and local government agencies in California by designating pre-approved suppliers ...
(Date:7/17/2019)... ... July 17, 2019 , ... People considering surrogacy usually have an altruistic ... story differs , but, in addition to creating a family, they have the opportunity ... and more Intended Parents are electing to have a child through the surrogacy process. ...
(Date:7/17/2019)... ... 2019 , ... The Coalition of Medication-Assisted Treatment Providers and ... its member Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) at 12 locations are participating in a ... with the goal of achieving better outcomes through telemedicine. The study, “Comparison of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/18/2019)... ... 18, 2019 , ... ComplianceLine, the premier provider of whistleblower ... it is moving into new corporate headquarters in Charlotte to service accelerating growth ... moving into the new office which will allow our expanding team of compliance ...
(Date:7/17/2019)... ... ... Soliant, a leading healthcare staffing provider and part of the Adecco Group, ... Beautiful Hospital in the U.S. In Soliant’s 10th annual top 20 contest, a record ... hospitals nominated. Supporters from across the country nominated and voted for facilities they felt ...
(Date:7/17/2019)... ... July 17, 2019 , ... The Omnia-Prova Education Collaborative ... Global Learning Collaborative (GLC). , “The past few years represent the highest ... leadership, and educational collaborations,” said Rob Braun, President of GLC. “The GLC brand ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: