Sleep apnea treatment could save lives & money by reducing auto accidents, according to researchers

Each year, potentially 980 lives could be saved and $11.1 billion in automobile-accident costs could be avoided if drivers who suffer from a disorder called obstructive sleep apnea were successfully treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), according to a study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine.

Published in the May 2004 issue of the journal Sleep, the study determined the percentage of accidents related to sleep apnea and applied the success rate of treatment to conclude how many of these accidents could potentially have been prevented.

The research team noted that 1,400 fatalities each year are caused by sleep-deprived drivers with obstructive sleep apnea, a breathing disorder caused by intermittent blockage of the airway. The condition is a common problem affecting millions of Americans. During sleep, these individuals stop breathing for 10 to 30 seconds at a time, sometimes up to 400 times a night. As a result of poor quality sleep, persons with sleep apnea experience excessive daytime sleepiness which can lead to motor vehicle crashes.

The most common, effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea is CPAP, where a patient wears a mask over the nose during sleep. Pressure from an air blower forces air through the nasal passages, preventing the throat from collapsing while the individual sleeps.

However, most people with obstructive sleep apnea don't realize they have the condition and don't get help.

In their study, the research team, which included investigators from the U.S. and Canada, analyzed medical research data from 1980 to 2003 to investigate the relationship between auto collisions and obstructive sleep apnea in untreated individuals. Additional data from the National Safety Council were used to estimate collisions related to obstructive sleep apnea, plus costs and fatalities, and their reduction with treatment. A final analysis included a

Contact: Sue Pondrom
University of California - San Diego

Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Sleeping Through the Night: Childrens sleep expert advises parents
2. Sleeping less may be related to weight gain
3. Sleep duration affects appetite-regulating hormones
4. Sleep loss boosts appetite, may encourage weight gain
5. Sleep disorders often indicate multiple health conditions
6. Sleep apnoea increases risks in general anaesthesia
7. Sleep problems in early childhood may predict substance use during adolescence
8. Sleep shortage takes toll on middle schoolers
9. Editorial in journal Sleep cites evidence of longer life with 6 to 7 hours sleep
10. Sleep apnea, depression linked in Stanford study
11. Sleep apnea treatment helps patients and partners

Post Your Comments:

(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... First Choice ... States, named Dr. Sesan Ogunleye, as the Medical Director of its new Mesquite-Samuell Farm ... Medical Director of our new Mesquite location,” said Dr. James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... and non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a ... area —Johnson is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... Montreal, Canada (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... the pursuit of success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high ... low, risk more than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced ... feelings, many turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a ... has released tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was out of ... verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” remembers Marcy. ... throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill them. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ANGELES , June 23, 2016 ... CAPR ), a biotechnology company focused ... therapeutics, today announced that patient enrollment in its ... in Duchenne) has exceeded 50% of its 24-patient ... enrollment in the third quarter of 2016, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... PARK RIDGE, Ill. and INDIANAPOLIS ... caliber of students receiving a Lilly Diabetes Tomorrow,s Leaders ... hands. The 2016 scholarship winners, announced today online at ... refused to let type 1 diabetes stand in the ... Lilly Diabetes has supported the Foundation,s scholarship program since ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Pa. , June 23, 2016 The ... in an outpatient dialysis facility.  Treatments are usually 3 ... 6 hours per visit, including travel time, equipment preparation ... a patient, but especially grueling for patients who are ... of a skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers for some ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: