HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Small social circles tied to heart disease death in women

Women with suspected coronary artery disease and smaller social networks die at twice the rate of those who have a larger circle of social contacts, according to a new study.

Thomas Rutledge, Ph.D., of VA San Diego Healthcare System and colleagues found that women who had more social contacts and saw them more often also had lower blood glucose and blood pressure levels, lower rates of smoking and other factors that reduced their risk for coronary disease. Women with larger social networks also showed fewer signs of artery blockage during the four-year study.

"The overall magnitude of the social network effect rivaled or exceeded that of more commonly considered biomedical risk factors including smoking, diabetes and hypertension histories," Rutledge and colleagues say.

However, social isolation's effect on heart health might have more to do with differences in income than anything else, the researchers concluded. In their study of 503 older women, Rutledge and colleagues found that annual income was statistically more important than social network size for predicting coronary disease death rates. Women with small social networks were also much more likely to make less than $20,000 a year, they discovered.

Although the findings point to a link between social isolation and low incomes, "it would be unwarranted from these results to suggest that the solution to social isolation consists of financial handouts," Rutledge and colleagues say.

In fact, they say, coronary disease and its disabling effects could be keeping women from making money and friends.

"For this reason, interventions that improve quality of life or symptom severity may enable women to pursue vocational or social relationships to a greater degree," they say.

In a 2003 study of women age 65 and older, Rutledge and colleagues found that women with larger social networks were less likely to die at a certain age than those with smaller social networks
'"/>

Contact: Thomas Rutledge
thomas.rutledge@med.va.gov
Center for the Advancement of Health
1-Dec-2004


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Small increases or blips in HIV levels do not signal mutations leading to drug-resistant HIV
2. Rices CNST awards Smalley/Curl funds for innovation
3. Small steps toward coverage
4. Small band of nurses plays key role keeping germ threats at bay
5. Small study shows SAMe may improve treatment of depression
6. South Floridas Small wins The Gerontological Society of Americas 2004 Margret M. Baltes Award
7. Smallpox vaccine can be diluted and still be effective, expanding supply if needed
8. Small, frequent doses of caffeine best strategy for staying awake
9. New study: Small, frequent doses of caffeine best strategy for staying awake
10. Small uterine fibroids may be linked with increased risk of miscarriage, early study results show
11. Smallpox vaccine may cause harmless skin rashes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/6/2019)... ... ... TIME For Kids (TFK) revealed the first-ever list of the ... destinations that are tailored to the interests of kids. The list identifies The Children’s ... list, TIME for Kids gathered nominations from its network of TFK Kid Reporters ...
(Date:12/5/2019)... ... December 05, 2019 , ... Abide, the #1 Christian meditation and sleep ... year using Bible-based bedtime stories. Listeners have recovered from bad dreams and night terrors, ... for Disease Control, one third of Americans suffer from poor sleep, which is linked ...
(Date:12/5/2019)... ... December 05, 2019 , ... It’s been an impactful year ... help people embrace, achieve, and maintain a healthy lifestyle to giving generously to ... our mission of impacting world health, so it’s gratifying to look back on ...
(Date:12/4/2019)... ... December 04, 2019 , ... ... Extract®, provides protection from disruptions to cells and tissue and inflammation that leads ... Jet Lag, is available in a dietary supplement product called Prepair™ . ...
(Date:12/4/2019)... ... 2019 , ... While the holidays are a time for joy and sharing, ... AgriLife Extension Service specialists. , “There are many behavioral and logistical ... wellness,” said Joyce Cavanagh, AgriLife Extension specialist in family economics, College Station. , Prioritize ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2019)... ... December 05, 2019 , ... nView, a leading behavioral ... the role of Chief Product Officer. As the company expands its portfolio of ... the behavioral health market into nView’s product and company growth strategy. Rosenbaum will ...
(Date:12/4/2019)... ... December 04, 2019 , ... Tenex ... minimally invasive technologies to treat chronic pain in soft and hard tissue, recently ... TX® technology. , Dr. Bernard Morrey, Chief Medical Officer of Tenex ...
(Date:12/4/2019)... ... December 04, 2019 , ... HGE Health, ... COPD patient’s symptoms, joined forces nearly a year ago with RespirCare, an operator ... care at times when the attention is most needed. The patient-satisfaction scores ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: