HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Studies reveal physicians' attitudes on end-of-life care

Doctors appear willing to use intensive treatment to lessen otherwise untreatable pain or other severe symptoms in dying patients even if the treatment, at least in theory, risks hastening the dying process, according to two University of Iowa and Yale University studies on end-of-life care.

Known as "terminal sedation," the practice involves the use of sedating medications to control a patient's symptoms even if it results in decreased or complete loss of consciousness. In contrast to physician-assisted suicide, terminal sedation may risk, but does not intend, hastening or causing death.

A majority of physicians in the studies drew a clear line between terminal sedation and assisted suicide. In addition, physicians' attitudes were related to two notable factors: their experience in caring for terminally ill patients and their frequency of attending religious services.

One study, which focused on internal medicine physicians, appeared in the October issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics. The second study, which focused on internal medicine residents (doctors in training), was published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

Both studies were led by Lauris Kaldjian, M.D., assistant professor of internal medicine in the UI Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and member of the college's Program in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. Kaldjian was formerly on the faculty at Yale University.

"End-of-life care involves many treatment decisions, some of which are focused on extreme pain and other symptoms that are very challenging to control," Kaldjian said. "We studied the specific ethical issues of treatments that control symptoms versus interventions that intend to cause or hasten death."

The study of internal medicine physicians, who had been in practice for at least several years, involved 677 Connecticut members of the American College of Physicians
'"/>

Contact: Becky Soglin
becky-soglin@uiowa.edu
319-335-6660
University of Iowa
6-Dec-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Studies underscore genetic involvement in nicotine addiction & aggressive hostility
2. Studies address issues of risk and survival in rapidly increasing GI cancers
3. Studies examine coffee drinking and risk of liver and colorectal cancers
4. Studies from the November issue of The Archives of Dermatology, a theme issue on facial rejuvenation
5. Studies link obesity to increased frequency of heartburn symptoms; greater risk of esophageal cancer
6. Studies demonstrate positive data in treatment of hepatitis C
7. Studies examine risk factors and potential consequences associated with prehypertension
8. Studies show ACTOS(R) (pioglitazone HCl) has positive effects on various components of dyslipidemia
9. Studies identify risk factors for colon cancer
10. Studies indicate healthy eating may affect cancer development, improve digestive system
11. Studies compare hysterectomy vs. other medical treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/19/2020)... ... 19, 2020 , ... In 2017, the EU’s revamped Medical ... that currently govern medical device manufacturers under the Medical Devices Directive (MDD); the ... Major changes from the previous MDD include:, , Elimination ...
(Date:2/19/2020)... ORLANDO, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... February 19, 2020 , ... ... per year as a result of healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs.) According to The Centers for ... accounted for is the large amount of screens that are now acting as an ...
(Date:2/16/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... February 16, 2020 , ... Canadian digital ... around the world to call who are concerned about the Coronavirus. , "It is ... we are trying to contain this deadly virus" said Prakash Chand, CEO of Ask ...
(Date:2/15/2020)... ... February 14, 2020 , ... It all started back in ... drawing these heart-shaped characters and knew she was on to something special. The ... navigate through any life challenge including a health condition or illness, a disability or ...
(Date:2/14/2020)... , ... February 14, 2020 , ... ... automation solution , further strengthening the company’s support for healthcare organizations using Amazon ... them don’t have the resources or experience to do so,” explained Cloudticity Founder ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/19/2020)... ... February 19, 2020 , ... ... for research data management, has released a new SnapGene integration. ... features. With a ‘Quick View’ of supported DNA files, the molecular biology ...
(Date:2/16/2020)... Wash. (PRWEB) , ... February 16, 2020 , ... In ... will provide free dental services at its Kennewick, WA office. , A limited number ... are unable to schedule beforehand. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please ...
(Date:2/15/2020)... ... February 14, 2020 , ... The creators of ... insert for a relaxing sleep experience—are excited to announce the launch of a Kickstarter ... shipped four different types of pillows over the last four years. Dullo Plus is ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: