HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Study Reveals Possible Clue For Racial Differences In Prevalence Of High Blood Pressure

DALLAS, June 19 -- Response to a stress chemical may help explain racial differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure, according to a report in this month's Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

In a study of blood flow in people during mentally stressful conditions, Julio A. Panza, M.D., and researchers at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, report that the blood vessels of healthy blacks don't relax as much as healthy whites. Blood vessels relax and widen during stress to redirect blood flow to muscles involved in the "flight or fight" response.

"The opening up of blood vessels in response to mental stress is a typical response and, normally, is partly mediated by nitric oxide," adds Panza, head of echocardiography at NHLBI. "But the activity of nitric oxide during mental stress is reduced in blacks."

To sort out the racial differences in the role of nitric oxide, the study compared the rate of blood flow in the forearms of healthy whites and blacks as they performed an increasingly difficult set of math problems.

The rate of forearm blood flow in whites increased more than twice that of blacks as they performed the math problems.

To determine the role of nitric oxide, Panza repeated the experiment after giving participants a drug that inhibits its production in the body. In whites, the rate of blood flow dropped significantly, while in blacks, it had no significant effect.

This test suggests that the activity of nitric oxide is reduced in blacks and is responsible for their lower response to stress-induced dilation of blood vessels. Therefore, a third test was given to determine differences in responsiveness to nitric oxide. Researchers administered a drug that produces nitric oxide and, again, they saw a significantly reduced response in blacks.

"Blood flow increases, but significantly less than in whites, indicating their response to nitric oxide is reduced," Panza says.

Nitric oxide, a smal
'"/>

Contact: Carole Bullock
caroleb@amhrt.org
214-706-1279
American Heart Association
18-Jun-1998


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Study of energy and health in Africa focuses spotlight on charcoal and forest management
2. Study shows promise in identifying kidney failure
3. Study shows patch therapy may be as effective as oral medications
4. Study shows soy is well accepted in school lunches
5. Study finds that coordinating care of chronically ill patients does not increase liability
6. Study provides new estimates of the causes of child mortality worldwide
7. Study finds factors linked to substance use disorder relapse among health care professionals
8. Study finds majority of women willing to accept cervical cancer vaccine for self and children
9. Study shows use of budesonide reduced the risk of asthma related events by 40% in children
10. Study shows risk of cardiac death after radiation for breast cancer has dramatically decreased
11. Study shows acrylamide in baked and fried food does not increase risk of breast cancer in women

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/10/2020)... ... February 11, 2020 , ... R3 Medical Training is now ... 2020 in Las Vegas. The training consists of thread lift placement on real patients ... , PDO thread lifts represent an excellent alternative currently for nonoperative facelift. The procedures ...
(Date:2/10/2020)... , ... February 10, 2020 , ... ... Health and Epidemiology Practice, has been elected president of the Society for ... she and her team develop and implement award-winning, research-driven Federal social marketing campaigns ...
(Date:2/10/2020)... SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Palette Life Sciences, Inc., a medical device company dedicated to assisting ... conditions and diseases, today announced the launch of the Solesta® Reimbursement Assistance ...
(Date:2/10/2020)... ... February 10, 2020 , ... American Family Care (AFC), ... aggressively expanding its healthcare network across New England. The first phase includes ... the fast-growing healthcare system. , AFC’s Founder and CEO, Dr. Bruce Irwin , ...
(Date:2/9/2020)... ... 09, 2020 , ... Kim A. Gorgens, Ph.D., ABPP is ... University of Denver. Since 2013, Dr. Gorgens and The Brain Injury Alliance of ... determined that 50-80% of the inmates in Denver County Jails have traumatic brain ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2020 , ... A device ... called Hush Buddy -- a patented sleep training system for children, launching today ... their parents. , With the Hush Buddy Sleep System, getting a child to sleep ...
(Date:2/10/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2020 , ... ... healthcare industry from cyberattacks. One way Alpine is securing healthcare is by working ... Medical devices range from external systems, such as drug infusion pumps or patient ...
(Date:2/7/2020)... ... February 07, 2020 , ... Isagenix International ... announced the grand prize winner of its 2020 U.S. IsaBody Challenge® at the ... Washington, was honored onstage in front of thousands of Isagenix independent distributors and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: