HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Study identifies new drug target for preserving brain cells

Doctors know that the body's natural response to injury inflammation can do more harm than good when it comes to the brain.

But new research from Steven Levison, Ph.D., associate professor of neuroscience and anatomy, Penn State College of Medicine, explains the cellular and molecular reasons why this is true. Furthermore, his research provides important information that could lead to new drugs to prevent brain cell death after injury or as a consequence of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.

Levison's study on mice, published in the July 15, 2002, print edition of Journal of Neuroscience, not only describes an important mechanism by which the body reacts to brain injury, but goes farther to show why inhibiting the effects of interleukin-1 a protein immune cells release in response to injury will stop additional brain tissue damage. The article will be released on-line on July 16, 2002.

"The study provides strong rationale for testing IL-1 receptor blocking reagents as treatments for traumatic brain injury and stroke, and even neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease," Levison said.

In both mice and humans, IL-1 is a vital component of the injury response. When IL-1 is released into a tissue, it activates scavenger cells known as macrophages to move into the injury site and cause inflammation. Macrophages release substances that kill bacteria and viruses, and they ingest dead cells. They also release IL-1, which signals more macrophages to invade the damaged tissue.

"The macrophage reaction is a good one in regenerating tissues, but in a non-regenerating tissue like the brain, it can be devastating," Levison said.

When macrophages release IL-1 and attract more of the scavenger cells to the brain, they become exited and overactive, causing harm to other cells nearby. This adds to the damage caused by the initial injury and destroys more healthy neurons.
'"/>

Contact: Valerie Gliem
vgliem@psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State
16-Jul-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Study of energy and health in Africa focuses spotlight on charcoal and forest management
2. Study shows promise in identifying kidney failure
3. Study shows patch therapy may be as effective as oral medications
4. Study shows soy is well accepted in school lunches
5. Study finds that coordinating care of chronically ill patients does not increase liability
6. Study provides new estimates of the causes of child mortality worldwide
7. Study finds factors linked to substance use disorder relapse among health care professionals
8. Study finds majority of women willing to accept cervical cancer vaccine for self and children
9. Study shows use of budesonide reduced the risk of asthma related events by 40% in children
10. Study shows risk of cardiac death after radiation for breast cancer has dramatically decreased
11. Study shows acrylamide in baked and fried food does not increase risk of breast cancer in women

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... People Serving People, the region’s largest emergency ... to the Max Day slated for Thursday, November 15. Last year, People Serving People ... Max Day. , Give to the Max Day is a project of GiveMN, ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... ... increased awareness and use of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal drug. Most states, ... naloxone to individuals without a prescription. , A new study ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... November 13, 2018 , ... Capillus was ... and Wishes that took place on November 4th at Lucien’s Manor in New Jersey. ... Friends Are By Your Side to provide courageous women battling cancer with a wig ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... Md. (PRWEB) , ... November 13, 2018 , ... ... Cell (hMSC) working cell banks and hMSC-specific bioprocess systems, announces today it has ... for its CliniControl™ line of cGMP hMSC working cell banks. This MF complements ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... November 13, 2018 , ... ... on the eating habits of more than 1,000 U.S. consumers. The latest research ... and beverage companies with predictive and forward-thinking analysis. , The research, conducted ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/13/2018)... ... 2018 , ... Intalere, the healthcare industry leader in delivering ... Outcomes, the latest episode of its Illuminated Path podcast series. , In ... medical surgical solutions at Intalere, shares her thoughts on what progress has been ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... NIGUEL, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... November 13, 2018 ... ... PDF automation solutions and digital transformation, continues its commitment to supporting charitable causes ... Autism . ActivePDF helped contribute to an event called “Spooktacular Social,” an over ...
(Date:11/13/2018)... , ... November 13, 2018 , ... The best treatment ... the November 2018 issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine. They say, with ... Badia, MD , does not necessarily agree with that strategy, at least when it ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: