HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
USC dental researchers develop first test for predicting cavities in children

A simple saliva test can predict for the first time whether children will get cavities, how many cavities they will get and even which teeth are most vulnerable, University of Southern California researchers say.

Developed by a USC School of Dentistry team led by professor Paul Denny, the test quantifies the genetic component of tooth decay (caries).

Dentists have long known that even in areas with fluoridation and good oral hygiene education, some people just have bad teeth. The USC test spots the risk early, when something can be done about it.

"When we apply this to young children, it allows us to predict what might be their future caries history - the number of cavities that they'll get by, say, their late twenties or early thirties," Denny said.

The Caries Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE) test measures the relative proportions in saliva of different types of sugar chains, known as oligosaccharides. The same sugar chains are present on tooth surfaces.

The effect of sugar chains on the tooth's ability to resist disease is analogous to the effect of "good" and "bad" cholesterol on blood vessels. "Good" sugar chains tend to repel the bacteria that cause cavities, while "bad" sugar chains allow the bacteria to bond to a tooth and start the decay process.

Unlike cholesterol, humans' sugar chain makeup is 100 percent genetically determined and cannot be changed. The USC researchers found that the sugar chain makeup in saliva can predict a child's future cavity history to plus or minus one cavity with greater than 98 percent confidence.

Children at the far ends of the spectrum - those with exceptionally weak or strong oral hygiene and nutritional habits - may develop more or fewer cavities than the test predicts. Bad habits may cause tooth decay, but researchers caution against extreme measures: completely eliminating sugar has not been shown to prevent cavities, and over-brushing can cause enamel erosion.
'"/>

Contact: Carl Marziali
marziali@usc.edu
213-740-4751
University of Southern California
18-Feb-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Finances, not having a dentist are primary barriers to seniors receiving needed dental care
2. Routine dental panoramic X-rays not necessary, study shows
3. Research fills dental need
4. Oral cancer survey from Case dental school shows dental hygienists role in catching cancer
5. HIV-positive U.S. military personnel accidentally vaccinated against smallpox
6. Experience is more effective than classroom learning in changing age bias in dental students
7. Making the case for a dental caries vaccine
8. Older patients need special attention in the dental chair
9. Incidental PET findings may reveal undetected cancer
10. Smokers may want to kick butt before dental procedures
11. Model dental school curriculum to address disparities in oral health care

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/24/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... September 24, 2018 , ... On September ... cost dental services for those in need from their surrounding communities. Over 40 volunteers ... of whom had not seen a dentist in years. , Smiles for Everyone ...
(Date:9/24/2018)... ... September 24, 2018 , ... As a leader in providing health, ... clients, and students improve their movement or mobility and strength and live their lives ... Instructor status. Mike is a Coach/Instructor at Tucson Strength located in Tuscon, ...
(Date:9/24/2018)... ... September 24, 2018 , ... Paris-based My ... customers’ doorsteps. Its roster of talented chefs works constantly to create innovative, balanced ... In addition to its standard weekly meals, My Cuistot is happy to customize ...
(Date:9/22/2018)... ... ... Liz Dudek, Director of Health Care Affairs for global law firm Greenberg Traurig, ... Assisted Living Association (FALA) at 10:00 a.m. at Tessera of Brandon located at 1320 ... the success of the first five years of Florida’s Statewide Medicaid Managed Care program, ...
(Date:9/22/2018)... ... September 22, 2018 , ... ... exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community through a ... its 12th annual Lymphoma Research Ride, a cycling event held each year during ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/24/2018)... ... September 24, 2018 , ... GlobalMed ... the medical device industry, is announcing the 21,000 square foot expansion of its ... founded to create win-win partnerships with both startup and mid-size medical device manufacturers ...
(Date:9/22/2018)... ... 21, 2018 , ... In the ever-changing healthcare real estate ... how the many changes affect their organizations. Toward that end, the 10th annual ... Galleria Dallas to provide informative panel sessions and networking opportunities for industry leaders. ...
(Date:9/15/2018)... ... September 14, 2018 , ... "As of Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, Cedar ... Florence. I am planning this Women of Influence tour with the knowledge that my ... knowing I have to hold onto my faith through this storm. So many lives ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: