HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Access to antiretrovirals unlikely to reduce HIV infection rates

A new study by Rebecca Baggaley, Neil Ferguson, and Geoff Garnett (of Imperial College London) suggests that the HIV epidemic in poor countries will not be controlled through antiretroviral drugs alone, even if universal access is achieved. As they demonstrate in an article in the open-access international medical journal PLoS Medicine, without additional prevention methods such as counseling patients and their communities about safe sex, access to drugs is likely to increase HIV/AIDS prevalence.

Sexual transmission of HIV is more likely if the HIV-positive partner has a higher viral load. Because antiretrovirals therapy (ART) slows AIDS progression and reduces viral load in infected individuals, the drugs not only improve the health and prolong the life of those who take them, but also make it less likely that they infect others. As a consequence, ART has been discussed not only as a treatment but also as a prevention tool in its own right.

To test this, Baggaley and colleagues used a model to predict and compare the impacts of alternative strategies of increasing ART access in resource-poor countries. Some of the strategies included the provision of diagnostic laboratories that could routinely measure CD4 counts and viral loads of HIV-infected individuals (only if this is done could people be treated before they develop overt symptoms). They also took into account different ways that people might change their sexual behavior if they get treatment (which might make them feel physically better and more likely to be sexually active) and counseling (which will hopefully increase safe sex practices).

They found that providing ART to all individuals with AIDS symptoms (i.e. those at the late stages of the disease) was likely to increase the prevalence of HIV infection, as these people live longer and become sexually active again. If ART is also provided to HIV-positive individuals at an earlier stage, i.e. when their immune system starts to get
'"/>

Contact: Andrew Hyde
ahyde@plos.org
44-122-346-3330
Public Library of Science
13-Mar-2006


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Access to alcohol among middle school children
2. Access to science enhanced by new NIH-ASH agreement
3. Access to existing medical treatments could save more lives than spending to improve the treatments
4. Accessible technology and rehab medicine help Americans with disabilities in todays work force
5. Access to mammography may worsen
6. Highly active antiretrovirals for HIV can substantially reduce rates of AIDS
7. Offenders unlikely to seek help when experiencing mental distress
8. Effects of new sleep medication appear unlikely to have potential for abuse or cognitive impairment
9. Search for cancer genes unlikely to succeed, say experts
10. Ozone recovering, but unlikely to stabilize at pre-1980 levels, says study
11. Nearly half of public health employees unlikely to work during pandemic

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Access antiretrovirals unlikely reduce HIV infection rates

(Date:7/28/2014)... 28, 2014 Quincy Bioscience, makers of ... pleased to announce the release of the fourth edition ... and co-founder Mark Underwood. , The Brain Health Guide ... useful techniques for readers to improve memory and promote ... conclusion, The Brain Health Guide provides ways to help ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Elementary school students seem to be ... according to a new study of school officials. , , ... Agriculture -- went into effect in the fall of 2012. ... buying lunch, or throw away most of their food. But ... this isn,t the case. , , "The updated meals standards ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... (PRWEB) July 28, 2014 Shofner ... Operation Military June . Renowned LASIK and Cataract ... to provide significant funds and public awareness for ... retired military personnel and their families. “This was ... proudly give nearly $5,000 to a variety of ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... By Maureen Salamon ... (HealthDay News) -- Infants and children who are at ... should be vaccinated against the infection, according to updated ... States. And routine vaccinations for the potentially ... the American Academy of Pediatrics says. In its ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, July 28, 2014 ... irregularities are more likely to get a pacemaker than people ... study of more than 16,000 people found that those with ... a pacemaker than those without the memory-robbing condition. ... dementia are so much more likely to be treated with ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Quincy Bioscience Launches the Fourth Edition of The Brain Health Guide 2Health News:Healthy School Lunches Get Thumbs Up From Students 2Health News:Shofner Vision Center’s “Operation Military June” Provided Funds For Local Not-For-Profit Organizations Supporting Military And Their Families 2Health News:Shofner Vision Center’s “Operation Military June” Provided Funds For Local Not-For-Profit Organizations Supporting Military And Their Families 3Health News:Doctors Urge Meningitis Shots for Vulnerable Infants, Children 2Health News:Doctors Urge Meningitis Shots for Vulnerable Infants, Children 3Health News:Pacemakers Common for Those With Dementia and Irregular Heartbeats 2Health News:Pacemakers Common for Those With Dementia and Irregular Heartbeats 3
(Date:7/28/2014)... 28, 2014  VigeneTech, Inc, in collaboration with ... Data Analysis Software, an OEM software solution for ... develops and offers varieties of bead-based multi-analyte immunoassay ... support of VigeneTech,s data analysis software, FCS data ... easily reported LEGENDplex™ software is ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... , July 28, 2014 Research and Markets ... Drugs Market 2014-2018" report to their offering. ... chronic disease that leads to inflammation and pain in the ... ankles. In addition, it causes inflammation of the tissues that ... The symptoms of RA begin slowly, usually just mild ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... 28, 2014  Syneron Medical Ltd. (NASDAQ: ... today that its new PicoWay® device has received CE ... colors and pigmented lesions on any skin type. PicoWay ... 532nm and 1064nm wavelengths, which utilizes Syneron,s proprietary PicoWay ... which are trillionths of a second, known as picosecond ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:VigeneTech Releases New Powerful Software for Flow Cytometry Data Analysis 2Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Market 2014-2018 2Syneron Announces CE Mark for PicoWay Dual Wavelength Picosecond Laser for Tattoo Removal and Treatment of Pigmented Lesions 2Syneron Announces CE Mark for PicoWay Dual Wavelength Picosecond Laser for Tattoo Removal and Treatment of Pigmented Lesions 3Syneron Announces CE Mark for PicoWay Dual Wavelength Picosecond Laser for Tattoo Removal and Treatment of Pigmented Lesions 4
Cached News: