HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Antiprotons 4 times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

Geneva, 31 October 2006 -- A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons.

"We have taken the first step towards a novel treatment for cancer. The results show that antiprotons are four times more effective than protons at terminating live cells. Although it still has to be compared with other existing methods, it is a breakthrough in this area of investigation." says Michael Doser at CERN, one of the scientists collaborating on the experiment. ACE brings together a team of experts in the fields of physics, biology, and medicine from 10 institutes around the world.

Current particle beam therapy commonly uses protons to destroy tumour cells inside a patient. The ACE experiment directly compared the effectiveness of cell irradiation using protons and antiprotons. To simulate a cross-section of tissue inside a body, tubes were filled with hamster cells suspended in gelatine. Researchers sent a beam of protons or antiprotons with a range of 2 cm depth into one end of the tube, and evaluated the fraction of surviving cells after irradiation along the path of the beam.

The results showed that antiprotons were four times more effective than protons. When comparing a beam of antiprotons with a beam of protons that cause identical damage at the entrance to the target, the experiment found the damage to cells inflicted at the end of the beam path to be four times higher for antiprotons than for protons. Michael Holzscheiter, spokesperson of the ACE experiment, summarises: "To achieve the same level of damage to cells at the target area one needs four times fewer antiprotons than protons. This significantly reduces the damage to the cells along the entrance channel of the beam for antiprotons compared to protons. Due to the antiproton's unsurpassed ability to
'"/>

Contact: Michael Holzscheiter
michael.holzscheiter@cern.ch
505-983-7664
CERN
31-Oct-2006


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Investigators uncover intriguing clues to why persistent acid reflux sometimes turns into cancer
2. Post-traumatic stress disorder 10 times higher in New Orleans than in the general public
3. Are higher doses of cholesterol drugs worth the extra money? Only sometimes, study says
4. Jefferson scientists find that drug-eluting stents are disappointing in bypass grafts -- sometimes
5. Topical anaesthetic spray delays ejaculation by five times as long says new study
6. New biomedical device uses nanotechnology to monitor hip implant healing, may reduce wait times
7. Waiting for trial results sometimes unethical
8. Immune system police learn early and sometimes badly
9. Hispanic and African American adults are uninsured at rates 1 1/2 to three times higher than whites
10. Smokers with heavily lined faces run five times the risk of progressive lung disease (COPD)
11. Smokers seven times more likely to receive jolt from heart devices

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/29/2020)... ... August 29, 2020 , ... When professor and author Randy Pausch was ... most people would. Rather than become melancholic, however, he put together a final lecture ... dreams. Randy Pausch took a negative situation and turned it into something that inspired ...
(Date:8/28/2020)... ... August 28, 2020 , ... ... to help treat patients with respiratory conditions, including COVID-19, while reducing the need ... oxygen, but it captures exhaled gas and scrubs it free of carbon dioxide ...
(Date:8/28/2020)... ... August 28, 2020 , ... With in-person gluten-free ... to continue helping the specialty-diet community connect with great, gluten-free brands. At the ... enter giveaways, chat with brands & watch over 50 educational classes... all online ...
(Date:8/28/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... August 28, 2020 , ... ... role in advising Adventist Health on its investment in Synchronous Health, a tech-enabled ... company that combines the strength of human empathy with artificial intelligence (AI) to ...
(Date:8/27/2020)... ... 2020 , ... Walk-in Dermatology’s SK-IN Medical Aesthetics Center announced ... York location. , Loren received her New York esthetic license in 2009 ... peels, microdermabrasion, Hydrafacial MD, dermaplaning, facial lymphatic, and various laser procedures. Loren is ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... August 31, 2020 , ... ... guide, has named Cloudticity a Gold winner in the 15th Annual 2020 Network ... recogniti o ns from Network Products Guide honoring achievements of world’s ...
(Date:8/28/2020)... ... August 28, 2020 , ... Dr. Mark Surrey ... endoscopic surgeon and serves as a clinical professor in the Department of OBGYN at ... American Laparoscopy Society & Pacific Coast Reproductive Society and is a Clinical Director of ...
(Date:8/27/2020)... ... 2020 , ... InfoMC, a leading provider of cloud-based healthcare ... System and Organizational Controls (SOC) 1® Type 2 and SOC 2® Type 2 ... achievements reflect their long-standing commitment to privacy, security, and risk management, while giving ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: