HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Bad cholesterol: Genes make the difference

BERKELEY, CA -- Why does it seem like some people can eat all the ice cream they want without increasing their cholesterol or gaining much weight, while others with high cholesterol have to watch their diets like a hawk? Because no matter what their lifestyle, people's genes play an overriding role in their cholesterol response.

So says a new study by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI), conducted by Paul Williams of Berkeley Lab's Life Sciences Division in collaboration with Robin Rawlings and Patricia Blanche of CHORI and Ronald M. Krauss of CHORI and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division. They report their findings in the July 8, 2005, issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The investigators analyzed how "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol) responded to diets that were either high or low in fat in 28 pairs of identical male twins -- one twin a vigorous exerciser, the other a comparative couch potato.

"Although identical twins share exactly the same genes, we chose these twins because they had very different lifestyles," says Williams. "One member of each pair was a regular long-distance runner, someone we contacted through Runner's World magazine or at races around the country. His brother clocked 40 kilometers a week less, at least, if he exercised at all."

For six weeks the twins ate either a high-fat diet (40 percent of its calories from fat) or a low-fat diet (only 20 percent of its calories from fat); then the pairs switched diets for another six weeks. After each six-week period the twins' blood cholesterol levels were tested.

The researchers were interested in learning if blood cholesterol changes due to the different diets would be the same or different in each pair of genetically identical twins, even though their lifestyles were very different. A correlation o
'"/>

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
8-Jul-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Genes and environment interact to promote cancer
2. Genes affecting blood pressure change as children become adults
3. Genes influence on common drugs may affect health-care quality, cost
4. Genes may influence nutritional composition of breast milk
5. Survival differences by race most apparent in advanced stages of breast cancer
6. Predicting danger of flu pandemic rests on differences in affected population, says O.R. Forum
7. Split the difference: Pill-splitting study looks at cost-saving step that could be used by millions
8. Study finds difference in survival rates among white and black women with advanced breast cancer
9. Brain activity reflects differences in types of anxiety
10. Cause of gender differences in blood pressure, kidney damage under study
11. Brains scans of symptomatic Gulf War veterans show differences

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/30/2021)... , ... March 29, 2021 , ... ... the 21st Century , A Virtual Workshop Presented by WCG FDAnews and Cerulean ... 4:30 pm EDT, https://wcg.swoogo.com/modern-sop-and-quality-systems , Are one’s SOPs written for the ...
(Date:3/30/2021)... ... March 29, 2021 , ... According to data released ... reproductive age (13-44) in need of publicly funded contraception live in counties impacted by ... Colorado’s 64 counties have lost some of their Title X resources. , The ...
(Date:3/30/2021)... ... March 29, 2021 , ... Health Literacy Innovations (HLI), a ... confusion due to low health literacy today announces a new partnership with the ... work with ACAP’s member Safety Net Health Plans, those that provide comprehensive health ...
(Date:3/30/2021)... ... ... Dr. Colin Campbell is proud to announce the 1 year anniversary in their new state ... internal medicine and is a primary care specialist who has been practicing for 23 years. ... keep South Jersey healthy one patient at a time. , “Over the past year, Dr. ...
(Date:3/30/2021)... ... March 30, 2021 , ... The COVID-19 ... and survivors; their families; and their caregivers. Crossroads4Hope is addressing the needs of ... emotional support system, MyGo2Support, which meets needs of people impacted by cancer, no ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/30/2021)... ... March 29, 2021 , ... The University of Texas Health Science Center ... San Antonio Multispecialty and Research Hospital, a destination center for research and treatment of ... In a nod to the COVID-19 pandemic, the ceremony was held virtually. , William ...
(Date:3/30/2021)... ... March 29, 2021 , ... Iora Health ... primary care, has partnered with Devoted Health , one of the fastest-growing ... across Maricopa County and provides seniors with the highest-quality care and experience possible, ...
(Date:3/30/2021)... CITY (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2021 , ... ... has joined the Vaccine Credential Initiative (VCI), a group bringing together leading health ... record of vaccination status, based on open, interoperable standards. By joining the VCI ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: