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Call for countries tackling HIV epidemics to learn from one another on 25th anniversary

A landmark new book, which compares different countries' responses to their HIV epidemic, twenty five years after the first reported AIDS cases in 1981, is published today.

The book, The HIV Pandemic: local and global implications, published by Oxford University Press, includes contributions from 165 authors, contains 28 country case studies, and 22 thematic chapters. It is being launched this evening at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

The book's publication coincides with the twenty fifth anniversary of the first reported AIDS cases by the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWR CDC) in June 1981. Since then, 60 million people worldwide are estimated to have been infected, 20 million of whom are thought to have died.

The authors build on information from World Health Organisation and UNAIDS, which generally examines the pandemic from a global perspective, by going a step further and locating the responses firmly within the context of each particular country and its health system. Secondly, and for the first time in book form, each chapter combines two perspectives one from health policy experts, the other from HIV specialists thereby providing an analysis, which integrates a 'top down' health system approach with a 'bottom' up HIV-specific perspective.

The authors ask vital questions about which health systems have performed well in tackling HIV and which less so, and hope that the answers will make it easier for countries to learn from one other and attempt to use, where appropriate, approaches which have been shown to be effective towards controlling the HIV epidemics in countries.

The twenty-eight countries were selected to provide a geographic spread across the regions of the world, including a range of high, middle and low-income countries and a variety of different types of health system. The countries studied are at different stages of the epidemic, have different levels of incidence and
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Contact: Lindsay Wright
lindsay.wright@lshtm.ac.uk
44-207-927-2073
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
17-May-2006


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