HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Cars, computer chips and heart attacks?

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The same philosophy used to make better cars and computer chips can also save the lives of heart attack patients, a new study finds.

In fact, 26 percent fewer patients died in the first year after their heart attack when hospitals used quality-improvement tactics to prevent crucial heart-care steps from "slipping through the cracks" -- in much the same way a car company ensures that a car is made well before it leaves the factory.

The steps included a checklist that doctors, nurses and patients in 33 Michigan hospitals had to complete before each patient could leave the hospital. The checklist, based on national heart-care guidelines, helped make sure that patients got crucial drugs, tests and lifestyle advice that could help prevent another heart attack.

And that's what appears to have saved the lives of many patients, compared with those treated before the quality-improvement effort started. The study involved 2,857 patients, 1,489 of whom were treated after the effort started.

In general, the chance that a patient would die within a month or a year of going home from the hospital was 21 percent to 26 percent lower after the quality-improvement effort.

The findings, published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, come from a study led by University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center co-director Kim Eagle, M.D., FACC and sponsored by the American College of Cardiology as part of their Guidelines Applied in Practice (GAP) initiative.

Eagle and his colleagues aren't suggesting that hospitals should become factories or treat every heart patient the same. But they point to their findings as an example of how health care professionals can learn from the quality movement that has transformed manufacturing, and how patients can benefit.

"Medicine based on memory alone is unreliable," Eagle says. "Guidelines for care, when embedded into a system used by doctor
'"/>

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
28-Sep-2005


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related medicine news :

1. Device helps physically disabled turn on computer
2. U of M researchers assess effectiveness of computerized physician order entry system
3. ISHLT membership explores expansion of computer modeling system for organ allocation
4. Research has shed light on the computer frustrations that plague older adults
5. Human brain region functions like digital computer, says CU-Boulder professor
6. 3-D computer simulation to aid treatment of collapsed lungs
7. Google-like process for mammogram images speeds up computers second opinions
8. Defining the limits of computerized physician order entry systems
9. Tracking computer-based error reports improves patient safety, Hopkins study finds
10. Penn researcher uses computer-based screening to help identify domestic violence victims
11. Forearm supports reduce upper body pain linked to computer use

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 09, 2020 , ... ... needs in the field of urology, today announced that Miguel Mercado, M.D., Texas ... Excellence. The designation recognizes that Dr. Mercado has achieved a high level of ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 10, 2020 , ... Traliant, an innovator in online ... course for managers on the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and the new ... family leave provisions related to COVID-19. , For more information, please visit: ...
(Date:7/7/2020)... ... July 07, 2020 , ... Dr. Louis M. DeJoseph is ... improve their scalp health. It is now possible to receive Keravive treatments from HydraFacial ... his practice, Dr. DeJoseph is able to provide clients with the best services to ...
(Date:7/4/2020)... ... July 03, 2020 , ... The ... Biocompare’s latest content hub— Future Lab: COVID-19 R&D . , Future Lab ... news, and products within specific scientific niches. Since their launch four years ago, ...
(Date:7/2/2020)... ... July 02, 2020 , ... Temprian, a ... autoimmune diseases. Its lead indication is vitiligo. Vitiligo patients develop progressive depigmentation ... , While vitiligo is equally prevalent in all ethnic groups, it is ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/28/2020)... ... June 28, 2020 , ... Probiotics have ... substantiate the effectiveness of oral-care probiotics to maximize teeth and gum health. ... behind both is simple – utilizing naturally occurring positive bacteria to improve health ...
(Date:6/28/2020)... ... , ... CPAP Store USA, known for its one of a kind concept ... and expanding at a rapid rate. Today, CPAP store USA is excited to announce ... located at 3920 Rosemeade Parkway, Suite 150, Dallas, Texas 75287. , Opening the new ...
(Date:6/25/2020)... ... , ... Billon Group received a £50,000 grant in the ... store COVID-19 related certificates to support workers’ safe return to the workplace. By ... sharing and verifying a wide array of workplace training or medical test documents ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: