HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Cervical cancer screening programs for low-resource areas appear effective and safe

Two "screen and treat" cervical cancer prevention programs developed for high-risk women in low-resource settings resulted in a lower prevalence of precancerous cervical lesions and cervical cancer, according to a study in the November 2 issue of JAMA.

Each year 471,000 cases and 233,000 deaths occur from cervical cancer worldwide, of which 80 percent occur in less-developed countries that have access to less than 5 percent of global cancer treatment resources, according to background information in the article. The lifetime risk of a woman developing cervical cancer in a low-resource setting is approximately 2 percent to 4 percent. Cytology (cell) -based screening programs have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer in developed countries that have the infrastructure to support these programs. However, these screening programs have been difficult to implement in low-resource settings.

Recently, a novel approach to cervical cancer prevention has been proposed that avoids the complex health infrastructure required by traditional approaches. This approach incorporates noncytology-based screening methods such as human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing or visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA; a weak acidic solution) followed by treatment of lesions using cryotherapy (medical treatment that involves application of nitrous oxide to lesions and a device using very low temperatures) of all eligible women with positive test results. Cryotherapy is a relatively low-technology treatment method. These approaches have advantages for low-resource settings because they are not cytology-based screening programs and do not require colposcopy (specialized equipment for examination of the vagina and the cervix), which overcome two of the greatest barriers to cervical cancer prevention. However, the efficacy of these screen-and-treat approaches has not been established, and there has been only limited safety data.

Lynette Denny, M.D., Ph
'"/>

Contact: Elizabeth Streich
212-305-6535
JAMA and Archives Journals
1-Nov-2005


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related medicine news :

1. Cervical cancer screening failure linked to poverty
2. Cervical cancer has profound psychosocial impact on affected women, as well as male partners
3. Cervical cancer vaccine proves effective: Test results
4. Conventional prognostic factors fail to explain better prostate cancer survival in most Asian men
5. Survival differences by race most apparent in advanced stages of breast cancer
6. Stomach cancer rate set to fall further 25 percent over next decade
7. MRI finds breast cancer before it becomes dangerous
8. Investigators uncover intriguing clues to why persistent acid reflux sometimes turns into cancer
9. New cause of tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells discovered at Lombardi
10. Pathway links inflammation, angiogenesis and breast cancer
11. Using MRI for diagnosis could help prevent breast cancer progression

Post Your Comments:
(Date:1/22/2015)... EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) and the ... in an effort to further promote visibility and adoption of ... long made AMA journals available via its subscription services, EBSCO ... Network. , Long known as both a subscription ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... a famous dress online store for wedding dresses and other ... of wedding dresses , and launches a site-wide women’s dress ... on your big day; the wedding gown is the most ... find the most suitable wedding dress. Now, we are proud ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... 2015 Lower-Auto-Insurance.com has released a new blog post ... car for reducing the costs of an auto insurance policy ... able to get lower prices for their vehicle insurance policies. The ... in determining policy costs. Because of this, drivers should always ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... USA (PRWEB) January 22, 2015 State ... statewide data management system with support from GEOSYSTEMS, a ... The new solution will leverage Hexagon Geospatial’s ERDAS ... vector data as well as point clouds and documents. ...
(Date:12/26/2014)... It is said that nothing makes a lady feel ... wedding dress supplier, shows its new selection of navy ... , UWDress.com’s navy cocktail gowns are the cornerstones of ... fashion styles. Simple dresses in bright neon colors can be ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:EBSCO Expands Partnership with the American Medical Association 2Health News:EBSCO Expands Partnership with the American Medical Association 3Health News:EBSCO Expands Partnership with the American Medical Association 4Health News:Find The Most Suitable Wedding Dress At JJsHouse.com 2Health News:Driving Safe And Other Factors That Make Auto Insurance Affordable! 2Health News:State Forestry Institute Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany Embraces Hexagon Geospatial Technology 2Health News:State Forestry Institute Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany Embraces Hexagon Geospatial Technology 3Health News:UWDress.com Shows Its New Navy Cocktail Dresses For 2015 2
(Date:1/23/2015)... N.C. , Jan. 23, 2015 For the pharmaceutical ... in dealing with payers. Likewise, the importance of the managed ... will only continue to grow as payer formularies and provider ... therapies. At the same time, managed markets leaders ...
(Date:1/23/2015)... Jan. 23, 2015 A lot of discussion in the ... treating  certain illnesses, injuries, or conditions. As medical science advances, ... methods with ones that they consider to be more cutting ... not one textbook method of treatment that stands out as ...
(Date:1/23/2015)... Jan. 23, 2015  A new analysis of Centers for ... enrollment data shows that 81 percent of seniors chose ... extra discounts at certain pharmacies. The findings were released ... plans are now the foundation of Medicare Part D," ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:As Payer Influence Rises, Pharmaceutical Companies work to Optimize the Managed Markets Function 2No One-Size-Fits-All Remedy for Hernia Correction 2New Analysis: 81 Percent of Medicare Part D Seniors Choose "Preferred Pharmacy" Plans in 2015 2
Cached News: