HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Despite rarity of errors in chemotherapy orders, improvements still needed, study finds

BOSTON In one of the first studies to examine chemotherapy errors in ambulatory care for cancer patients, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have found that about three percent of chemotherapy orders in three outpatient infusion clinics studied contained mistakes. Most of the errors were intercepted by nurses and pharmacists before reaching patients, and none were life-threatening or caused patient harm; but the results show that room for improvement exists even in hospitals with strong error-prevention programs, the authors say.

The research, reported in today's online version of the journal Cancer (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/cancer-newsroom), was made possible by Dana-Farber and BWH leaders' decision to share drug-order and patient-safety records with investigators. Both hospitals are established leaders in efforts to reduce medication errors and heighten patient safety. The findings of the study have prompted both Dana-Farber and Brigham and Women's to make changes in the hospital's automated drug order-entry system to further lessen the chance of mistakes.

"Our results show that while safeguards such as computerized order-entry systems used at both Dana-Farber and Brigham and Women's significantly reduce drug-order errors, additional improvements are still possible, and necessary" says the study's co-lead author, Tejal Gandhi, MD, MPH, of Brigham and Women's.

Adds co-lead author Sylvia Bartel, RPh, MHP, of Dana-Farber, "DFCI's leadership supported the in-depth review of all medication orders to gain information about potential system defects. The goal was to utilize the results of the study to make system improvements and ensure a safe medication process for our patients."

Previous studies have estimated that about five percent of drug orders for hospitalized patients have errors, but much less scie
'"/>


24-Oct-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Despite claims, not all probiotics can treat diarrhea say experts
2. Despite laws, many pregnant women lack HIV testing
3. Despite medical advances, children receiving liver transplants wait longer than a decade ago
4. Despite conflicting studies on obesity, most Americans think the problem remains serious
5. Despite WHO/UNICEF push for rooming-in, mothers and babies being separated at birth
6. Despite alternatives, addictive drugs most often prescribed for sleep problems
7. Pharmacists workload contributes to errors
8. Hospital errors rise 3 percent -- HealthGrades patient-safety study
9. Doctors extended duration work shifts are associated with medical errors and adverse events
10. Medication errors affect childrens leukemia treatment
11. Physicians more likely to disclose medical errors that would be apparent to the patient

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/18/2014)... Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have ... treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month. Of ... Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Program, only four ... Johns Hopkins researchers. They are Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.; ... , Jonathan Powell, a professor of oncology, will ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI) recently ... molecule in metastatic breast cancer reduces both the growth ... BRI scientists have found in models of the disease ... - 80 percent and can keep the tumor from ... five-year grant comes from the National Cancer Institute of ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... Diego, Calif. (April 18, 2014) ― A new study ... analyzing weekly patterns in health-related Google searches reveals a ... health strategies. , Investigators from San Diego ... and the Monday Campaigns, analyzed "healthy" Google searches (searches ... e.g., "healthy diet") originating in the U.S. from 2005 ...
(Date:4/18/2014)... lead to potential new treatments for breaking the cycle ... Fibrosis, or scarring, is a hallmark of the disease, ... lead to serious organ damage and, in some cases, ... on findings made by Swati Bhattacharyya, PhD, research assistant ... specific protein plays in promoting fibrosis. , "Our ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have ... than those with no inflammation, according to results of ... Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. , The link between persistent ... so-called high-grade prostate cancer those with a Gleason ... of the most aggressive and rapidly growing prostate cancers. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Benaroya Research Institute evaluates immunology approach to blocking breast cancer 2Health News:New research shows people are thinking about their health early in the week 2Health News:New clues on tissue scarring in scleroderma 2Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 2Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... novel wearable injector slightly larger than an Oreo cookie may ... prescription drugs in the large doses required to treat a ... and genetic disorders.  An emerging biologic drugs ... to analysts.   Many of these drugs will require a new ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Jan. 14, 2014 The Brandeis Medical Center, led by Dr. ... a premier and affordable laser tattoo removal experience with the advanced ... is in providing high quality cosmetic services with cutting edge medical ... " Southern California has seen a dramatic increase ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... , Jan. 14, 2014   NuAire , a manufacturer of ergonomically ... with Hitachi Koki of Japan ... North America . NuAire will utilize its network of ... Canada to offer assistance in application use, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:Enable Injections Presents A New Class of Injectors for Drug Delivery at PEPTalk, Drug Delivery Partnership Meetings 2Beverly Hills Physician Features Tattoo Removal with the Astanza Duality Laser, Offers $99 Special 2NuAire announces sales and service of Hitachi Koki centrifuges in North America 2
Cached News: