HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Hopkins geneticist discovers mutations in cancer cells that suggest new forms of treatment

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified three new genetic mutations in brain tumors, a discovery that could pave the way for more effective cancer treatments.

The Hopkins team, in conjunction with researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute in Rockville, Md., discovered DNA abnormalities in two tyrosine kinase proteins already known to disrupt normal cell activity and contribute to tumor formation.

The discovery of these mutations is especially significant, the researchers say, because tyrosine kinases can be targeted using pharmaceuticals.

"We picked these proteins to sequence because receptor tyrosine kinases sit on the cell surface where anticancer drugs can get at them," said Gregory J. Riggins, M.D., co-lead author of the study and an associate professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

In the study, published in the October 4th edition of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers identified two of the previously unknown mutations in fibroblast growth receptor 1 (FGFR1) and one in platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA).

FGFR1 and PDGFRA, said Riggins, have been implicated in several other cancers such as colorectal, breast and ovarian cancer, as well as chronic myelogenous leukemia, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and lymphoma.

Riggins and colleagues analyzed a catalog of 518 protein kinase sequences taken from the Human Genome Project. Using high-throughput gene sequencing equipment based at the Venter Institute's Joint Technology Center, they resequenced 20 targeted proteins from tissue samples of brain tumor cells from Hopkins. The cells came from 19 glioblastoma tumors from eight females and 11 males ranging in age from 7 to 77 years. Glioblastomas are malignant tumors of the central nervous system usually found in the cortex of the brain.

Researchers discovered the mutations after comparing the reseq
'"/>

Contact: Eric Vohr
evohr1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
26-Sep-2005


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Johns Hopkins begins aggressive screening for superbugs in children
2. Johns Hopkins develops pancreas cancer risk model
3. Hopkins study reveals white blood cells can both hurt and help transplanted kidneys
4. Hopkins scientists link immune response to ghost parasites and severely congested sinuses
5. Hopkins-led study finds that chronic form of depression runs in families
6. Diagnosis and referrals for kidney disease fall well short of need, Johns Hopkins study shows
7. Johns Hopkins Childrens Center to lead largest-ever study on kidney disease in children
8. Hopkins scientists show hallucinogen in mushrooms creates universal mystical experience
9. Johns Hopkins lab scientists tame overactive CF protein
10. Hopkins researchers develop new quick tool to sort out insect bites in children
11. Hopkins scientists use embryonic stem cells, new cues to awaken latent motor nerve repair

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The OSHA Training Center at Chabot-Las ... headquartered in Northern California, has issued an important reminder to employers to prevent ... Employers with workers exposed to high temperatures should establish a complete heat illness ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... ... "FCPX editors can now reveal their media with growing colorful split screen ... - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Color brings the split screens ... reveal the media of their split screens with growing colorful panels. , ProSlice Color ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... health professionals, announced today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. This ... the network of the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... today announced its strategic partnership with Connance, a healthcare industry leader providing ... companies’ proven, proprietary technology combine to provide health systems, hospitals and ambulatory ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... edge technology to revolutionize the emergency ambulance transport experience for the millions of ... of how Uber has disrupted the taxi industry through the use of technology. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... One of Australia,s successful biotechnology scientists, Dr ... biotechnology company, Noxopharm Limited [ABN 50 608 966 123] ("Noxopharm"). Noxopharm ... on the ASX. Noxopharm is a clinic-ready company with ... 1 clinical study later this year. ... problems facing cancer patients - the ability of cancers to become ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... DUBLIN , June 27, 2016 Jazz ... the waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act ... proposed acquisition of Celator Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Celator"; Nasdaq: ... 11:59 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time). As previously ... entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Jazz ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... June 27, 2016  VMS Rehab Systems, Inc. ( ... take whatever measures required to build a strong and ... is currently listed on the OTC Markets-pink current trading ... and CEO, "We are seeing an anomaly in market ... not only by the Company, but shareholders and market ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: