HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Inadequate communication reduces benefits of mammogram screening for black women

Black women may not get the full benefits of mammogram screenings because the results are not adequately communicated, according to a new study by Yale Public Health researchers in the March issue of American Journal of Public Health.

To help reduce death and disability from breast cancer, the second most common cause of cancer death in American women, current guidelines recommend routine mammography screening for women aged 40 years and older. Despite widespread availability of mammography screening and relatively high self-reported screening rates in national survey data, racial disparities persist, in part resulting from diagnosis at later stages in black women when compared to white women.

Beth A. Jones, associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale School of Medicine led the study. In this community-based, two-year study of black and white women receiving mammograms in Connecticut, the investigators sought possible race-related differences in the screening mammography process.

Jones and colleagues compared self-reported mammogram results, collected by telephone interview, to results listed in the radiology record of 411 black women and 734 white women aged 40 to 79 who underwent screening in five hospital-based facilities in Connecticut. They examined whether black women were as likely as white women to self-report results that matched the mammography radiology report. A second objective was to determine how the results of a screening mammogram affected the communication of those results.

Mammogram screening results were inadequately communicated to or understood by 14.5 percent of all women in the study. Of these, 12.5 percent reported they had not received their screening results, while the other 2.5 percent inaccurately reported their results. Black women were significantly more likely than white women to report never receiving their mammography results and/or to report results th
'"/>

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University
31-Jan-2007


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Inadequate housing may contribute to poor health in immigrant farmworker families
2. IOF Bone Apptit campaign wins prestigious communications award
3. Even when childs cancer prognosis is poor, parent/physician communication can provide hope
4. Improving communication with families of dying patients reduces stress, anxiety and depression
5. Spanish project AmIVital creates intelligent communication devices for elderly and disabled people
6. Fragile X, Down syndromes linked to faulty brain communication
7. Clinical simulation technology used to improve communication of medical teams
8. Racial differences in communication impact medical care
9. Better communication between families, health care providers can reduce cost, length of stay in ICU
10. You dont say: Patient-doctor nonverbal communication says a lot
11. Patients missing out in communication divide

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/24/2017)... ... 24, 2017 , ... In “Sky and I”, a young boy was walking home and feeling down about himself. ... him otherwise. The new friend says he can do whatever he wants to do if ... enough just the way he is. God created him with special talents and gifts. We ...
(Date:9/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 24, 2017 , ... “The Gospel Truth Of The Bible: The ... “The Gospel Truth Of The Bible: The Other Sheep” is the creation of published author, ... born in the West Indies. He has been a member of the Seventh-day Adventist ...
(Date:9/23/2017)... ... September 23, 2017 , ... Silicon Valley Hair Institute, the leading ... new blog post focused on the ARTAS® hair transplant system and the younger demographic. ... the latest, most technologically sophisticated methods of hair restoration. , “It can be emotionally ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... ... MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: , Save Our Hospital - Albert Lea will host media ... against Mayo Clinic. Specifically, media can talk to steering committee members and patients regarding ... the Albert Lea hospital. , The rally aims to protect the most vulnerable and ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... September 22, 2017 , ... ... soon as possible, and they often saves lives. However, if one isn’t accessible ... to widen the availability of defibrillation, I came up with this idea," said ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/6/2017)... -- NeuroRx, a clinical stage biopharma company developing the first ... been granted Fast Track status by the US Food and ... followed by NRX-101 (D-cycloserine + lurasidone). The company will shortly ... therapy targeting patients who are admitted to Emergency Departments with ... ...
(Date:9/5/2017)... another milestone in their continued growth and success of the company.  Xyntek has ... engagements regionally.  ... at 318 West Adams Street, Suite 1528, Chicago, IL ... Xyntek's recently opened Midwest office will support the ... In addition to Xyntek,s headquarters ...
(Date:9/5/2017)... 2017 Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ... pharmaceutical company focused on the development of oral drug ... its meeting with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... At the meeting, ... for submission of ORMD-0801, would be a Biologics License ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: