HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Johns Hopkins team finds 'ancestral' hepatitis-C virus at the root of evolution in infections

amma would indicate, the scientists say, that the immune system was weakening in its response to the virus' mutations.

After analyzing the genetic changes in the sites, called epitopes, where the T cells specifically bind to the virus, the researchers found no changes had occurred during the one year of follow-up in the one patient who self-recovered. However, in the remaining seven patients, there were changes in 69 percent of T-cell epitopes, showing that the virus had mutated at key locations necessary for chronic infection to proceed.

Additional analysis showed that changes in T-cell epitopes were 13 times more frequent than changes in the remaining genome of the virus. The researchers examined the binding ability of T cells obtained early in infection to recognize 10 viral peptides known to have changed during the first six months of infection. Eight showed severely reduced capacity to stimulate production of interferon gamma, offering confirmation that the virus was mutating to evade the immune system.

Analysis of the viral RNA in the blood of seven patients with chronic infections revealed that eight of 16 changes in genome matched to the consensus sequence, confirming the presence of selective evolutionary pressure toward restoration of an ancestral form of the virus.

In the second study, using blood samples collected in Cork, Ireland, the researchers compared the genetic makeup of the virus in 22 chronically infected women to the original strain that had infected them more than 20 years before. The women were among hundreds accidentally infected in 1977 by a blood product tainted with hepatitis C, providing the researchers with unique access to the source of the infection, which came from a single donor unaware of having the illness.

Using computer analysis techniques developed at Hopkins, the scientists mapped these changes against the genetic makeup of the women's immune response. The researchers found th
'"/>

Contact: David March
dmarch1@jhmi.edu
410-955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
9-Jun-2005


Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6

Related medicine news :

1. Johns Hopkins begins aggressive screening for superbugs in children
2. Johns Hopkins develops pancreas cancer risk model
3. March of Dimes, Johnson & Johnson Pediatric Institute launch prematurity prevention partnership
4. Diagnosis and referrals for kidney disease fall well short of need, Johns Hopkins study shows
5. Johns Hopkins Childrens Center to lead largest-ever study on kidney disease in children
6. Johns Hopkins lab scientists tame overactive CF protein
7. Two tests better than one for diabetes control, Johns Hopkins expert tells doctors
8. Johns Hopkins scientists exploit novel route to reverse enlarged hearts in obese mice
9. Johns Hopkins scientists map brain area that may aid hunt for human brain stem cells
10. Johns Hopkins study suggests link between caffeine dependence and family history of alcoholism
11. Johns Hopkins flu expert calls for mandatory vaccination of health care workers

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/23/2014)... Steven Reinberg HealthDay ... -- Many obese and overweight American children and teens ... is fine, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday. "Being ... such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes," ... the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,s National ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... 2014 Home Care Assistance Calgary ... seniors, is proud to announce the next installment in ... a wide range of health and wellness-related fields. The ... award-winning author Nancy Kriseman, and will cover the most ... burnout by becoming more self-aware. In particular, Nancy will ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... new study supports a growing body of research ... steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with ... than with standard anti-hormone therapies. The study will ... open-access journal Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology . ... cancer in women in the United States. Approximately ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... DC (PRWEB) July 23, 2014 ... for ATA 2015, ATA’s twentieth annual meeting and ... The meeting, expected to attract over 5,000 attendees ... will take place May 3-5, 2015, in Los ... most renowned healthcare technology professionals from researchers, clinicians, ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... X syndrome ( FXS ) is a genetic disorder ... on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. ... impairment and the most common cause of autism. , ... have published a study that sheds light ... online today (July 23) in the Journal of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Many Obese U.S. Kids Think They're Thinner Than They Are 2Health News:Many Obese U.S. Kids Think They're Thinner Than They Are 3Health News:Home Care Assistance Calgary to Host Public Webinar on the Topic of Caregiver Mindfulness 2Health News:Home Care Assistance Calgary to Host Public Webinar on the Topic of Caregiver Mindfulness 3Health News:Hormones after breast cancer: Not fuel for the fire after all? 2Health News:Hormones after breast cancer: Not fuel for the fire after all? 3Health News:Hormones after breast cancer: Not fuel for the fire after all? 4Health News:Hormones after breast cancer: Not fuel for the fire after all? 5Health News:ATA Seeks Speakers to Present at the World’s Largest Telemedicine, mHealth and Telehealth Conference 2Health News:Study links enzyme to autistic behaviors 2Health News:Study links enzyme to autistic behaviors 3
(Date:7/23/2014)... 23, 2014 Pharmavite LLC announced that Timothy ... officer effective immediately. Toll recently served as Pharmavite,s executive ... category management, private label and sales administration in ... global role, Toll will expand his responsibilities to include ... "Toll,s appointment to chief customer officer is part ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... 23, 2014 Research and Markets ... "Global Electrophysiology Ablation Catheters Market 2014-2018" report ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 Catheter ablation is a ... faulty electrical pathways from sections of the heart ... cardiac arrhythmias). Cardiac arrhythmias can be of several ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... , July 23, 2014 PositiveID ... Fla. , is an emerging player in ... systems for bio-threat detection and rapid medical testing. ... M-BAND (Microfluidic Bio-agent Autonomous Networked Detector), was developed ... Security ("DHS") Science & Technology directorate, and $30 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:Global Electrophysiology Ablation Catheters Market 2014-2018: Key Vendors are Boston Scientific, Johnson & Johnson, Medtronic and St. Jude Medical 2Global Electrophysiology Ablation Catheters Market 2014-2018: Key Vendors are Boston Scientific, Johnson & Johnson, Medtronic and St. Jude Medical 3PositiveID Analyst Inspection: Emerging Contender in BioThreat Detection - First Ever Revenue Guidance and Backlog Position Company for Increased Visibility and Traction - by SmallCapTraders.com 2
Cached News: