HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Low literacy increases risk of death and misunderstanding of medical consent forms

Literacy at less than a ninth-grade level almost doubles the five-year risk of mortality among elderly people, regardless of education, socioeconomic status, or health, according to a study led by a researcher at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

"From a public health standpoint, this has important implications," says lead author Rebecca Sudore, MD, a staff physician at SFVAMC and an assistant professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. "Poor literacy appears to have long-lasting effects on patients' health. This is yet just one more reason why improving the educational system in the US is so important."

The study appears in the August 2006 issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, a special issue devoted to the topic of health literacy.

In another study led by Sudore that appears in the same issue, findings showed that only 28 percent of adults understood a highly simplified medical consent form the first time they encountered it, even after extensive modification of the consent process in order to improve understanding. The form, written at a sixth-grade reading level, was read aloud to subjects in English or Spanish as they read it for themselves.

"We cannot make the assumption that anyone, even highly literate native English-speakers, will understand medical consent information," asserts Sudore.

The literacy and mortality study analyzed data on 2,512 participants in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study that was conducted by the National Institute on Aging from 1999 to 2004. Study subjects, aged 70 to 79, lived independently in the community in Memphis, Tennessee or Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The study excluded participants with dementia or poor physical functioning.

Among participants with limited literacy defined as a reading level of less than ninth grade the death rate was 20 percent. Among all others, the death rate was 11 percent. After taking into acco
'"/>

Contact: Steve Tokar
steve.tokar@ncire.org
415-221-4810
University of California - San Francisco
3-Aug-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4 5

Related medicine news :

1. New study on relationship between literacy and understanding of prescription labels
2. Lower literacy means poor health and poor health care access for older people
3. $500,000 grant launches health literacy project to benefit older adults
4. Physicians: Simple instrument allows medical staff to check patients literacy
5. Poor health literacy associated with poorer physical and mental health
6. Chemotherapy with bevacizumab increases risk of blood clots in arteries
7. Reduced greenhouse gas emissions required to avoid dangerous increases in heat stress
8. Risk of Parkinsons disease increases with pesticide exposure and head trauma
9. Sleep apnea increases risk of heart attack or death by 30 percent
10. Obesity increases risk of injury on the job
11. Stress of deployment increases risk of child abuse, neglect in military families, UNC study shows

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/1/2020)... ... ... As fall and winter swiftly approach and many businesses cut costs to ... time to expand and grow into a full-fledged natural health clinic over the past ... relaunching its brand new website, expanding its services menu and has recruited top-tier healthcare ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... ... found out your dear friend has cancer? , It’s hard to hear your doctor say ... diagnosis. Once the shock wears off, the questions and fears can be overwhelming. , How ... to help? Words are failing me. I’m scared. I want to DO something. , We’ve ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... Colo. (PRWEB) , ... August 31, 2020 , ... ... provider of innovative higher-learning opportunities through high-quality, career-relevant, and affordable online education – ... Responder Psychology . , Among the first of its kind in the ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... , ... In an effort to give back to the community in which ... hotel room booked with a special new rate code to benefit children and families ... immediately. Donations will be applied to any room type, any time, now through ...
(Date:8/28/2020)... JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... August 28, 2020 ... ... that Forcura’s Founder & CEO Craig Mandeville was named an Entrepreneur Of The ... The Year program honors entrepreneurial business leaders whose ambitions deliver innovation, growth and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/28/2020)... ... August 28, 2020 , ... Dr. Mark Surrey has ... surgeon and serves as a clinical professor in the Department of OBGYN at UCLA’s ... Laparoscopy Society & Pacific Coast Reproductive Society and is a Clinical Director of Fellowship ...
(Date:8/27/2020)... ... 27, 2020 , ... Bleep LLC, maker of the DreamPort mask-less CPAP solution, ... company’s new spokesperson. , “In my line of work, a good night of sleep ... DreamPort it was a Bleeping no brainer for me,” said Jensen. “From the moment ...
(Date:8/26/2020)... ... 2020 , ... AseptiScope, a privately funded San Diego, California based, clinical innovation ... Outlook. , “AseptiScope is pleased to receive this recognition,” said Kelly Powers, ... on their hands, goggles on their eyes, covers on their shoes, and gowns on ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: