HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Menopausal women don't get enough guidance on treatment options, Stanford survey shows

STANFORD, Calif. - Few women are consulting their doctors before opting to use herbal therapies and soy products to treat their menopausal symptoms, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found.

The trend is of particular note because growing numbers of women are turning to alternative therapies to relieve such symptoms as hot flashes, headaches, mood swings and sleep disruptions because of concerns about health risks associated with hormone therapy, which is still considered the most effective way of treating such difficulties. The researchers recommend that physicians learn more about these products so that they can help their patients choose safe, effective methods of treating their symptoms.

"We're not promoting the use of these alternative therapies," said lead author Jun Ma, MD, PhD, research associate at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. "We're just saying that the demand for these therapies is growing and that physicians should be prepared to talk to their patients about it."

The study appears in the May/June issue of The Journal of the North American Menopause Society. The study was funded by GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare, which had no role in the study design, data collection or preparation of the manuscript for publication. The pharmaceutical company manufactures the herbal product RemiFemin Menopause.

The study was based on a 2004 online survey of a random sample of 781 U.S. women between the ages of 40 and 60. Because the sample size was small, Ma cautioned that the findings may not accurately represent all women, but said the data provide useful insights into women's attitudes toward menopause treatments and how much physician guidance they have received in deciding which therapies to use.

Among the women surveyed, nine out of 10 reported having experienced at least one menopausal symptom at some point. When it came to treating their symptoms, 37 percent reporte
'"/>

Contact: Susan Ipaktchian
susani@stanford.edu
650-725-5375
Stanford University Medical Center
15-Jun-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related medicine news :

1. Antioxidants show no clear benefit against cardiovascular events, death in high-risk women
2. Some women benefit more from exercise when emphasis is on health, not appearance
3. Even older women at high risk have little interest in being tested for HIV, study finds
4. In women, caffeine may protect memory
5. Why women get more migraines than men
6. Hot flashes may be welcome sign in women with breast cancer, study says
7. Study finds difference in survival rates among white and black women with advanced breast cancer
8. Tumor cell activity may provide clues for treating breast cancer in young women
9. Men worry more about penile size than women, says 60-year-old research review
10. Focused ultrasound relieves fibroid symptoms in women
11. Increasing radiation dose shortens treatment time for women who choose breast sparing treatment

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/27/2020)... ... , ... ResMed Launches AirFit F30i, Its First Tube-up Full Face CPAP Mask ... of the AirFit F30i, Its First Tube-up Full Face ResMed CPAP Mask. The CPAPers ... connection, compact under-the-nose or traditional over-the-nose cushion styles, and even memory foam versus silicone ...
(Date:1/25/2020)... ... ... Trust must be earned. It’s a slow, gradual, and fragile process, which is often ... the motives behind a deep sense of distrust can be complex. Some people use ... pain of betrayal. Dig far enough into a distrusting person’s past, and what will ...
(Date:1/24/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... January 24, 2020 , ... ... Secours Mercy Health Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital (OLBH) achieved a 59 percent ... goal established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. , The retrospective ...
(Date:1/24/2020)... ... 2020 , ... The new strain of Wuhan coronavirus was first identified in ... Japan, and South Korea. The virus is believed to have started in the Chinese ... infected. , EPA has confirmed that the 2019 novel coronavirus-Wuhan (also 2019-nCoV) has ...
(Date:1/24/2020)... ... January 24, 2020 , ... SweetLeaf Stevia Sweetener, ... and best-selling nutrition author Jorge Cruise to educate consumers on losing weight through ... enthusiastic advocate of intermittent fasting, that is fat burning and boosting your energy, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/22/2020)... ... January 22, 2020 , ... ... BX software to U.S. customers. A total redesign of their legacy software, the ... streamlined functionality and intuitive navigation, while maintaining the testing and training accuracy they ...
(Date:1/22/2020)... ... ... Natreon, a nutritional ingredient company, is proud to announce the grant of ... strong patent portfolio to a total of 24 active patents, as well as 40 ... of treating osteoarthritis in a mammal, comprising administering to a mammal in need thereof ...
(Date:1/12/2020)... ... January 11, 2020 , ... New Life Hiking Spa ... vacation and information on how to book an affordable option. , Improved health and ... the frenetic pace of everyday life, sight see and a try a new cuisine, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: