HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Neuroscientists identify how trauma triggers long-lasting memories in the brain

Irvine, Calif., July 26, 2005 --A research team led by UC Irvine neuroscientists has identified how the brain processes and stores emotional experiences as long-term memories. The research, performed on rats, could help neuroscientists better understand why emotionally arousing events are remembered over longer periods than emotionally neutral events, and may ultimately find application in treatments for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

The study shows that emotionally arousing events activate the brain's amygdala, the almond-shaped portion of the brain involved in emotional learning and memory, which then increases a protein called "Arc" in the neurons in the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in processing and enabling the storage of lasting memories. The researchers believe that Arc helps store these memories by strengthening the synapses, the connections between neurons.

The study will appear in today's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Emotionally neutral events generally are not stored as long-term memories," said Christa McIntyre, the first author of the paper and a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior in UCI's School of Biological Sciences, working with James L. McGaugh, research professor and a fellow at the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. "On the other hand, emotionally arousing events, such as those of September 11, tend to be well-remembered after a single experience because they activate the amygdala."

In their experiments, the researchers placed a group of rats in a well-lit compartment with access to an adjacent dark compartment. Because rats are nocturnal and prefer dark environments, they tended to enter the dark compartment. Upon doing so, however, they were each given a mild foot-shock an emotional experience that, by itself, was not strong enough to become a long-lasting memory. Some of the rats then had th
'"/>

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine
26-Jul-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Neuroscientists discover new cell type that may help brain maintain memories of smells
2. Nepalese researchers identify cost-effective treatment for drug-resistant typhoid
3. STAMP system can help professionals to identify potentially violent individuals
4. Diabetes professionals join forces to identify gaps in diabetes care and better self care
5. OHSU Cancer Institute, VA researchers find way to identify which men need a second biopsy
6. Virtual autopsy helps identify drowning as cause of death
7. Stanford researchers identify immune dysfunction in melanoma patients
8. Researchers identify new therapy for patients with Crohns disease
9. Molecular marker may help identify pancreatic cancer, and possibly predict survival time
10. UQ researchers identify thousands with curable high blood pressure
11. Scientists identify cells responsible for relapse after treatment in common childhood cancer

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/19/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Residents in long-term-care nursing facilities were prescribed fewer medications when ... to a study of U.S. men and women led by the staff at ... Institute (BRI) . The quality assurance study examined the high number of prescriptions ordered ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... April 18, 2019 , ... BNCT ... to deliver targeted radiation to cancer cells while sparing surrounding healthy tissue. NTI’s ... platforms. Engineered from the ground up for high reliability and ease of maintenance, ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... 18, 2019 , ... She went from learning disabled to honor roll – ... Cheryl Reilly. Those “goofy tests,” performed by Deborah Zelinsky, O.D. , founder of ... had such narrow range of visual awareness, she could only see what was directly ...
(Date:4/17/2019)... , ... April 17, 2019 , ... ... advice. However, recently, this reluctance appears to be changing. Whether because of demographic ... at least, probe their healthcare providers advice. , In the past, efforts to ...
(Date:4/17/2019)... ... , ... Fertility Centers of Illinois will recognize ... unite millions of Americans aiming to remove the stigmas and barriers associated with ... of Illinois is offering seven free physician-led webinars and free Fertility Awareness Checkups, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... April 18, 2019 , ... Bioclinica®, a leading provider of ... development of medical therapies, announced today that it has assembled a team of ... nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), to help sponsors develop therapeutics using medical imaging and other ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... April 18, 2019 , ... Global Lyme Alliance ... research, education, and awareness, and Ranger Ready Repellents, a new EPA-registered brand ... of tick-bite prevention, including the proper use of repellents, to safeguard the public ...
(Date:4/17/2019)... ... , ... Salt Lake Community College has named Jay K. Francis ... at SLCC’s May 3 Commencement at the Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, ... Miller Family Philanthropy. Richards is president and CEO of SelectHealth. , Francis studied business ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: