HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
New 'litmus test' could aid discovery of anti-cancer drugs

EVANSTON, Ill. --- Using the unusual color properties of gold at the nanoscale, scientists at Northwestern University have developed a "litmus test" for DNA and small molecule binding that eventually could be used by pharmaceutical companies to rapidly identify promising candidates for new anti-cancer drugs.

The detection system, called colorimetric screening, can be used to detect a variety of targets, such as DNA, small molecules and proteins, that bind to DNA, and the strength of the bond is indicated by a simple color change.

In a paper reported online today (March 28) by the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), the research team used the colorimetric method to screen for molecules that can facilitate the formation of a special form of DNA called a triple helix. Triple helix DNA involves three strands rather than the two associated with normal DNA. However, unlike double helix DNA, the triple helix is unstable alone and requires a small molecule triplex binder to increase its stability. This research builds on work reported March 6 in the German journal Angewandte Chemie in which the same method was used to screen small molecules for their binding affinity to duplex DNA.

"Pharmaceutical companies are targeting DNA for different therapies, and they need to identify DNA or small molecules that selectively bind to DNA to turn on or off the gene expression related to a particular disease," said Chad A. Mirkin, George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, professor of medicine and professor of materials science and engineering, who led both studies. "Our method, which is simpler, faster and more convenient than conventional methods, should help researchers zero in on potential anti-cancer agents from their large libraries of candidates more quickly."

In the JACS paper, the researchers demonstrated that when a triplex binder binds to a given DNA triple helix in solution the strength of that binding event can be detected by
'"/>

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University
28-Mar-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Seat belt injuries could signal more serious trauma in children
2. Using MRI for diagnosis could help prevent breast cancer progression
3. Metabolic study in mice could lead to good cholesterol boosters
4. Miniature implanted devices could treat epilepsy, glaucoma
5. Health reform bills could improve quality and efficiency, but fall short of national plan
6. Experts predict Tamiflu could halve the pandemic influenza death toll versus no intervention
7. Split the difference: Pill-splitting study looks at cost-saving step that could be used by millions
8. Oxygen trick could see organic costs tumble
9. New study could bring relief to sweltering city slickers
10. Decision aid tool could cut the number of Caesarean sections by 4000 a year
11. Papillomavirus vaccine could substantially reduce cervical cancer incidence

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/24/2016)... ... , ... Regenerative Medicine is being transformed by ongoing research and clinical findings ... patient results as have been achieved with Okyanos Cell Therapy are paving ... for patients worldwide. , As the Medical Advisory Chairman at Okyanos, Eric Duckers, MD, ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... choose the perfect data logger for each job, ensuring the best suited solution ... calibrations of MadgeTech data loggers at their lab in Istanbul. , Metroloji Okulu ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... American Gene Technologies ... to its board of directors. Otterstatter is co-founder, president and CEO of ... technological innovations that lead to broad-based healthcare solutions. , “Jon knows how to ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... ... WaterAid launched the #perioddrama campaign to mark Menstrual Hygiene Day on May 28 ... world who do not have access to a toilet, even when they’re on their periods. ... #perioddrama. The (sometimes hilarious) results help shine a light on the awkwardness that women face ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... patient Services To Begin In June , Aloria Health, specializing in a re-imagined, ... opening of Aloria Milwaukee, its first treatment facility for outpatient, day treatment and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... Los innovadores de COMBO[TM], ... introduce catéteres para la intervención de extremidades inferiores ... global especializada en el suministro de soluciones vasculares ... incluyendo productos para tratar la enfermedad arterial periférica. ... los dispositivos de primera entrada de la compañía ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Dutch surgeons have launched a ... the world and treat patients on a global scale. Medical professionals ... Asia and the US have already signed ... and networking in a totally secure environment. Education  ... zone working together with a surgeon at Harvard to treat a ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... PUNE, India , May 23, 2016 ... is spread across 163 pages, profiles 12 companies and ... 280 tables and figures on the industry and its ... study that is comprehensive in nature, details the current ... of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: