HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Penn psychologists believe 'unit bias' determines the acceptable amount to eat

PHILADELPHIA Hosts can do their Thanksgiving guests a big favor by serving smaller portions using smaller utensils. That's the word from psychologists at the University of Pennsylvania.

The findings, to be published in the journal Psychological Science, demonstrate the power of what the researchers have termed "unit bias": the sense that a particular portion of food is appropriate. Unit bias provides the basis for understanding why portion size influences how much food you eat. Their work on how individuals decide what goes into a single serving of food offers further warning to the weight-conscious in the coming holiday season.

"In terms of food, unit bias applies to what people think is the appropriate amount to consume, and it shows why smaller portion sizes can be just as satisfying," said Andrew B. Geier, lead author and a graduate student in Penn's Department of Psychology. "A 12-ounce can of soda and a 24-ounce bottle are both seen as single units. But be careful, the 24-ounce bottle, though viewed as one unit, is actually more than two and a half servings of soda."

Unit bias can be seen in all types of consumption, whether it is how much food you take or how many times you ride the roller coaster. This bias, the researchers believe, is mostly derived from a culturally designated "proper" portion. It may also explain why portion size causes the French to eat much less than Americans.

"The French eat from smaller portion sizes, but small portion size is only a barrier if there is something keeping them from consuming more portions," Geier said. "This is where we believe unit bias comes into play; without it, people would just eat more units."

According to Geier, people see food in natural consumption units, whether that is a single wrapped candy or a plateful of food.

Geier and Penn psychology professor Paul Rozin designed their experiments to observe how people choose to act in the presence of unlimited free food in
'"/>

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@pobox.upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania
21-Nov-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Multi-tasking adversely affects brains learning, UCLA psychologists report
2. Students feel safer in ethnically diverse schools, UCLA psychologists report
3. Boston University psychologists find neurological mechanism for subliminal learning
4. Americans believe global warming is real, want action, but not as a priority
5. Two-thirds of nursing students believe its wrong to lie to patients, twice as many as in 1983
6. Some factors related to heart function and linked with heart failure more common than believed
7. New Orleans toxic soup a less serious problem than initially believed
8. Understanding what people with arthritis believe about exercise
9. Heart risks from Vioxx happen much earlier than believed, says Queens researcher
10. Health professionals believe gender bias limits womens progression in NHS
11. Three reasons not to believe in an autism epidemic

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:9/1/2020)... ... September 01, 2020 , ... KitoTech Medical, a Seattle-based medical ... which will be used to accelerate the commercialization of its microMend® family of ... will continue to expand its customer base of healthcare systems as well as ...
(Date:9/1/2020)... ... September 01, 2020 , ... Dr. Kiran Gill is a ... of the face, breast, and body. In 2018, she founded Aesthetics in Plastic ... and aesthetic practice in Southwest Florida. Dr. Gill and her team offer surgical ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... ... dear friend has cancer? , It’s hard to hear your doctor say the words “You ... shock wears off, the questions and fears can be overwhelming. , How should I respond? ... are failing me. I’m scared. I want to DO something. , We’ve talked to experts ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... August 31, 2020 , ... ... solution for chiropractors, announced today the launch of its integrated, HIPAA compliant, telehealth ... running their virtual practice in under 90 seconds. , According to the ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... ... and topsy-turvy economic outlook continues to put financial strain on many of us, so it ... from our monthly expenses and put more into savings, if possible. , “That’s a great ... safety net in place in case something were to happen to you,” says Lee Duncan, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/27/2020)... ... August 27, 2020 , ... The GHT Companies ... its fundraising initiative for Feeding San Diego with a press conference at ... Companies presents the final check of $5,000.00+ representing an overall donation result exceeding $30,000 ...
(Date:8/26/2020)... ... 2020 , ... AseptiScope, a privately funded San Diego, California based, clinical innovation ... Outlook. , “AseptiScope is pleased to receive this recognition,” said Kelly Powers, ... on their hands, goggles on their eyes, covers on their shoes, and gowns on ...
(Date:8/26/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... August 26, 2020 , ... ... and in-home air purification systems kill Coronavirus. While air purification technologies, including GreenTech ... including SARS and even Ebola, no air purification system has published results of ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: