HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Shape-altering genes linked to ovarian cancer

HOUSTON - Frequently referred to as a silent killer, ovarian cancer offers few clues to its presence, often until it has spread beyond the ovary to other tissues. Early detection has been difficult because ovarian cancer is not a single disease, but appears in many forms, with each form behaving differently. Now researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have explained how and why different forms of ovarian cancer evolve in a discovery that could lead to earlier detection and perhaps more personalized treatment for a disease that will claim an estimated 16,210 women's lives in the United States in 2005.

Honami Naora, Ph.D., an assistant professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Molecular Therapeutics and her colleagues discovered that a set of shape-altering genes become activated in ovarian cancer. These HOX genes, better known for their role in normal embryonic development, direct the cancer cells to take a variety of different forms, depending on which of the genes is turned on. The researchers reported their finding in the April 10, 2005 on-line issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

"Our finding explains how each of the three major forms of ovarian cancer acquire their unique appearance," says Naora. "These genes cause a metamorphosis of the ovarian epithelial cells, directing them to change their shape."

These strange shapes make each form of ovarian cancer different from one another, and also different to the surface epithelium or outer covering of the ovary from which these cancers are thought to arise, explained Naora. Serous ovarian cancer exhibits features resembling those of the fallopian tubes; the endometrioid form has features resembling the lining of the uterus; mucinous ovarian cancer even looks like intestinal cells.

These mysterious shapes have caused some researchers to speculate that ovarian cancers might originate from some other tissues, and not the ovarian surface epithelium at all.
'"/>

Contact: Nancy Jensen
nwjensen@mdanderson.org
713-792-0655
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
15-Apr-2005


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Pathway links inflammation, angiogenesis and breast cancer
2. Inflammatory system genes linked to cognitive decline after heart surgery
3. New angiogenesis inhibitor has promise for treating deadly brain tumor
4. Risk of spina bifida associated with choline metabolism genes, but unrelated to choline intake
5. Researchers show surprising interaction between genes, gender and hypertension
6. Researchers identify genes that allow brain cancer-causing stem cells to resist treatment
7. NHGRI funds assessment of public attitudes about population-based studies on genes and environment
8. Claiming diagnostic tests for diabetes genes is misleading, say experts
9. Zebrafish show advantages in assessing human cancer cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo
10. Variations in detoxifying genes linked to Lou Gehrigs disease
11. Researchers link two more genes to sudden infant death syndrome

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/29/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 29, ... ... suburbs and South Hills of Pittsburgh now have easier access to the ... only by Allegheny Health Network (AHN). Orthopaedic surgeons at Forbes Hospital and ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... ... The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to announce ... million gift to establish the Ken Moelis and Julie Taffet Moelis Advance Access ... MBA for highly-qualified Penn undergraduates whose academic and career interests expand traditional notions of ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... , ... VisualSP has helped over 1.5 million SharePoint users learn the content ... of its Help System for SharePoint was at the farm level. Enterprises using SharePoint ... , The company recently released a modified version of the Help System, VisualSP ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... , ... Tuesday, March 28, 2017, is the annual American Diabetes Association Alert ... to find out if they are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. In ... sky by programming the LAX pylons the color red. Downtown’s U.S. Bank Tower Crown ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... India’s Chigurupati Technologies announced ... address the resolution to globally reduce the harmful use of alcohol set forth ... and TTB approved ingredients that when infused into alcohol, renders the alcohol liver ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... -- FinancialBuzz.com News Commentary  ... Data published in a research report by Grand View Research, Inc., ... USD 55.8 billion by 2025. The projection takes into consideration the continuous ... a more open approach towards cannabis products around the world. In 2016, ... North Dakota , Ohio , and ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... SHELTON, Connecticut , March 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... cybersecurity company Sectra (STO: SECT B) ... (UPHS) will install Sectra PACS in their healthcare ... and the Epic EMR, will enable access and ... clinical pathway. Additionally, UPHS and Sectra will enter ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... Induced Neutropenia (CIN) – Market Insights, Epidemiology and Market Forecast-2023" Report ... the Chemotherapy Induced Neutropenia for the seven major markets i.e., ... France , Germany , ... Japan , as well as rest of ... The Report covers the therapeutics market revenue, treatment practice and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: