HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Soot from wood stoves in developing world impacts global warming more than expected

New measurements of soot produced by traditional cook stoves used in developing countries suggest that these stoves emit more harmful smoke particles and could have a much greater impact on global climate change than previously thought, according to a study scheduled to appear in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Perhaps as many as 400 million of these stoves, fueled by wood or crop residue, are used daily for cooking and heating by more than 2 billion people worldwide, according to the study's lead authors, Tami Bond, Ph.D., and doctoral candidate Chris Roden of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. In a field test in Honduras, the researchers found that cook stoves there, which are similar to those used in other developing nations, produce two times more smoke particles than expected, based on previous laboratory studies. These dark, sooty particles, which are darker than those produced by grassland or forest fires, have a climate warming effect because they absorb solar energy and heat the atmosphere, according to Roden.

In earlier work, Bond estimated that burning firewood -- the principal fuel for cook stoves in the developing world -- produces 800,000 metric tons of soot worldwide each year. In comparison, diesel cars and trucks generate about 890,000 metric tons of soot annually. These two sources each account for about 10 percent of the soot emitted into the world's atmosphere each year, she said.

In addition to its environmental effects, smoke from cook stove fires is a major cause of respiratory problems, eye infections and tuberculosis, according to the researchers.

"Emissions from wood cook stoves affect the health of users -- especially of women and children -- neighborhood air quality, and global climate. Reducing these emissions, through the use of cleaner burning stoves and fuels, should have far-reaching benefits," Bond said.

In th
'"/>

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society
24-Oct-2006


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Indoor pollution from cooking on wood stoves affects women in developing countries
2. Program announced to improve care in developing areas for patients with blood disorders
3. Caring for the sick now a public health priority for developing countries
4. Over time, more women are developing MS than men
5. Addressing the neglect of childhood hearing impairment in developing countries
6. First step in developing heart hormone-based pill to control high blood pressure
7. USC-led study suggests exercise reduces risk of developing invasive breast cancer
8. Cells passed from mother to child may be first step in developing new treatments for type 1 diabetes
9. Tuberculosis risks for health workers in developing countries
10. Global strategies to improve health in developing countries need truly global discussions
11. Adolescent smokers have a greater risk of developing alcohol-use disorders than nonsmokers

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/29/2017)... ... 2017 , ... A New York high tech innovator and a Canadian not-for-profit ... of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in helping nudge men forward to be more proactive about ... of the Canadian Men’s Health Foundation (CMHF), whose mission is to inspire men to ...
(Date:5/28/2017)... ... ... HYPERAMS, LLC announced it will perform the inventory liquidation of ... The sale began this week and the inventory is expected to sell quickly. ... medical accessories, including blood pressure cuffs, stethoscopes, CPR masks, as well as blank polos, ...
(Date:5/28/2017)... ... 28, 2017 , ... Viewers likely know Rob Lowe from such 80s hits ... for his work on NBC’s The West Wing and Parks and Recreation. But recently, ... “Informed,” which puts the spotlight on important modern-day issues that face today’s society. One ...
(Date:5/27/2017)... ... ... In any business, follow up is critical to success. It is the same ... there will always be some patients who can’t or won’t make a immediate decision. ... it comes to presenting treatment. After the patient leaves, most practices end up ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2017 , ... Mediaplanet ... & Wound Care" campaign in USA Today, which will educate readers on how to ... of the campaign, a large focus is placed on melanoma. Dancing with the Stars ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/15/2017)... , May 15, 2017  Amy Baxter MD, chief ... leader in noninvasive pain relief, was awarded a 2017 ... magazine. Baxter was recognized at the MM&M Top 40 ... York City on May 10, 2017. The ... biopharma industry go "beyond the pill."  "Innovation ...
(Date:5/10/2017)... Global Health Intelligence (GHI), the leading healthcare data analytics ... 2017 ranking of the Best-Equipped Hospitals in Latin America ... GHI,s hospitals database for Latin America , which is ... database covers 86% of the hospitals in Latin ... each institution in key areas such as beds, medical specialties, ...
(Date:5/9/2017)... WASHINGTON , May 9, 2017  Demonstrating ... the board of directors for the Pharmaceutical Research ... criteria for membership. Biopharmaceutical companies will now have ... in order to be eligible to join PhRMA. ... criteria, the board is sending a clear message ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: