HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Sticky proteins provide new insight into drug action

How drugs such as adrenalin do primarily one thing in this case, increase the heart rate now makes more sense to scientists.

"Any time you get a sudden jolt, adrenaline (a.k.a. epinephrine) is why your heart rate goes up," says Dr. Nevin A. Lambert, a biophysicist at the Medical College of Georgia. "If your heart is about to stop and the doctor administers epinephrine, that is what he or she is trying to do."

New research, to be published in the Nov. 21 print issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and already available online in Early Edition, may help explain how cells respond correctly to epinephrine.

Most drugs never get inside cells; they interact with external receptors that activate G proteins roaming inside cells. "If you are going to change the way the cell works, you have to transduce a signal from outside a cell inside," says Dr. Lambert. "It's like a relay. G proteins interact with receptors; they run into them, they collide with them. The receptor itself does not do anything other than turn on these G proteins."

There are only four classes of G proteins, but cells contain thousands of copies of them which interact with hundreds of surface receptors. Each G protein is actually three protein subunits stuck together: alpha, beta and gamma.

Textbooks have long said that once G proteins are activated, the alpha protein splits from the beta and gamma subunits, which are irrevocably stuck together as a beta-gamma pair. Each half of the now dissociated G protein can cause the cell to do something different. "Sometimes they help each other out; sometimes they work at cross purposes," says Dr. Lambert.

With epinephrine, that should mean the alpha subunit enables production of cyclic AMP, which increases the heart rate, while the beta-gamma pair should activate ion channels, making cells less electrically excitable and decreasing the heart rate.

However, i
'"/>

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@mcg.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia
14-Nov-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Sticky surfaces turn slippery with the flip of a molecular light switch
2. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
3. Head and neck cancer vaccine targets proteins to create immune response
4. First major study of mammalian disorderly proteins
5. Keep the baby, toss the bathwater: How kidneys retain proteins, discard waste
6. Measuring proteins in spinal fluid may provide early clue to Alzheimers disease
7. Identification of role for proteins in childrens muscle disease could open up new treatment options
8. Mechanism for neurodenegerative diseases linked to transport proteins
9. New test to detect rare proteins in blood
10. 200 proteins which detect diseases of the liver
11. Researchers find multiple proteins that stick to medical devices

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/14/2020)... ... February 14, 2020 , ... “The American ... weight, skin texture and discoloration, and lines and wrinkles. And the treatments they ... offering some great specials in February specifically to address the areas our patients ...
(Date:2/13/2020)... ... February 13, 2020 , ... Charles ... Assisted Living in Phoenix, AZ announced today his re-election as the President of ... Living Facility Managers (NCIA). , As President of the State Board, Villafranca ...
(Date:2/13/2020)... ... February 13, 2020 , ... ... fourth consecutive year, his budget proposes substantial, damaging cuts to foreign affairs, global ... cut to development and diplomacy, slashes USAID global health programs by $3.1B, and ...
(Date:2/11/2020)... ... ... There are many reasons why Care to Care is a leader in ... above our competitors is our true Peer to Peer process. At Care to Care, ... experience. We understand that it is impossible to create criteria to cover every clinical ...
(Date:2/11/2020)... ATLANTA (PRWEB) , ... February 11, 2020 , ... The wait is finally over. The ... Novo Nordisk. For years, this squad has been associating professional sports to a truly special ... in the world made up entirely of athletes with diabetes. They decided to take on ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/19/2020)... DURHAM, N.C. (PRWEB) , ... February 19, 2020 , ... ... illustrate the presence of oxygen-deprived clusters throughout the damaged site of a compressed spinal ... the use of a viral vector to target the oxygen-deprived sites enhances the injured ...
(Date:2/19/2020)... ... February 19, 2020 , ... ... of platforms. Molecular diagnostics platforms are increasingly becoming popular as they enable accurate ... 2019, the market for molecular cancer diagnostics, including histology and assays, reached $1.6 ...
(Date:2/19/2020)... ... February 19, 2020 , ... ... performing healthcare provider organizations with the release of its annual GHX “Best ... amongst North America’s premier hospitals for their ability to demonstrate improved operational performance ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: