HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Study finds room for improvement in angioplasty, shows what can be done to cut risks

Each year, more than 600,000 Americans have angioplasty procedures to open clogged arteries near their hearts, and treat or prevent a heart attack. But a new study shows that the quality and risk of their treatment can vary widely depending on where they go and demonstrates how it could be improved.

In a paper published in the journal Circulation, a group of Michigan researchers reports data from a multi-hospital project that studied angioplasty care and outcomes at five hospitals where doctors and nurses received guidance and data to help them improve angioplasty care, and seven hospitals where they did not.

The project is led by researchers from the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center and was initially funded by the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation, with ongoing funding from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Blue Care Network. It's called the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium, or BMC2.

The results yielded a dramatic "before" and "after" contrast. Before the start of the project, the 3,731 patients treated at the five hospitals in one year received widely varying levels of care. Many never received drugs that could help prevent complications during or after their angioplasty, while others received far more than necessary of the blood-thinning drug heparin, or the dye that lets doctors see blockages while they perform the minimally invasive procedure.

There was also wide variation in how patients did afterward, including their risk of kidney damage related to the dye, and their need for emergency heart surgery and blood transfusions.

But five years later, after the intensive quality-improvement project was under way, the 5,901 patients treated at the same five hospitals in that year received much better and more uniform care, including much higher rates of preventive medication use, less use of heparin, and more appropriate amounts of dye. They also did better overall,
'"/>

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
10-Feb-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related medicine news :

1. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
2. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
3. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
4. Study reveals gaps in vaccine financing for underinsured children
5. Study suggests nonpharmaceutical interventions may be helpful in severe influenza outbreaks
6. Study shows radiofrequency ablation highly effective in treating kidney tumors
7. Study says normal but out-of-control enzyme may be culprit that signals some cells to become cancer
8. Study finds HIV protease inhibitor drugs may adversely affect the scaffolding of the cell nucleus
9. Study outlines how stroke, head injury can increase risk of Alzheimers disease
10. Study identifies new regulator of fat metabolism
11. Study shows Diachrome improves blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/26/2016)... Oakland, California (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 ... ... liabilities associated with discovery of thousands of defective respirators, according to court documents ... in the case of William and Becky Tyler v. American Optical Corporation, Case ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... On Memorial Day, Hope For Heroes and USA Medical Card will ... country. The nonprofit Hope For Heroes partnered with the leading provider of free ... military veterans, as well as police, firemen, and EMS professionals across the country, and ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Hampshire (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... MadgeTech ... are designed, engineered, and manufactured in Warner, New Hampshire at the MadgeTech headquarters. With ... provide reliable monitoring solutions trusted by government agencies, including NASA. , In 2012, ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... In an effort to provide hair restoration information to the widest possible audience, ... who do not use the app. Dr. Mohebi, the founder of Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration, ... . , Dr. Mohebi says, “The positive response to the Snapchat videos we started ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... The Lung Institute has partnered with the Gulfcoast North Area Health ... their clinic in downtown Tampa. The class is complimentary for the public. Register online ... free downloadable 4 Week Smoking Cessation Guide for those who are unable ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/26/2016)... 26, 2016 Since its commercial ... an essential life science tool for conducting genetic studies ... Research reveals in its new report that the industry ... one powered by a range of new applications in ... (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140723/694805 ) , Since ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... According to a new market ... 4D), by Therapeutic Area (Oncology, Cosmeceutical/Plastic Surgery), by Application ... Manufacturers, Hospitals/ Clinics) - Forecast to 2021", published by ... for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. This ... 2021 from USD 117.3 Million in 2016, at a ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... Germany and GERMANTOWN, Maryland ... N.V. (NASDAQ: QGEN ; Frankfurt Prime Standard: QIA) ... and co-development agreement with Therawis Diagnostics GmbH to develop and ... to develop and market PITX2 as a marker to predict ... breast cancer patients. "We are pleased to partner ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: