HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Study identifies potential drug target for Huntington's disease

An enzyme known to be critical for the repair of damaged cells and the maintenance of cellular energy may be a useful target for new strategies to treat Huntington's disease (HD) and other disorders characterized by low cellular energy levels. In the August issue of Chemistry & Biology, a research team from the MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease (MIND) describes their discovery of a novel inhibitor of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP1) and their findings that PARP1 inhibitors can protect HD-affected cells from damage in laboratory assays.

"While PARP1 is essential for the repair of damaged DNA, we also know that, if overactivated, it can cause cell death by excessive energy depletion," says Aleksey Kazantsev, PhD, director of the MIND High Throughput Drug Screening Laboratory, who led the current study. "It has recently been shown that neurons from patients with Huntington's appear to be energy-deficient, so we hypothesized that modest stresses that would be tolerated by healthy cells could send HD cells below a viable energy threshold and that blocking PARP1 activation could be protective."

To test this hypothesis the MIND researchers first ran a computer search of their small-molecule library for potential novel inhibitors of PARP1, searching for those with structural similarities to known inhibitors. "Safety and efficacy of human drugs depends on many factors, so it's hard to predict which inhibitor would be most effective against a specific disorder. The more diverse novel inhibitors can be identified, the more chances there are of developing safe and effective drugs," Kazantsev explains.

Two candidate molecules were identified as potential PARP1 inhibitors based on their structure, and both of them were confirmed to inhibit the enzyme's activity in an in vitro assay. However, when tested using cultured human and rat cells, only one of the candidate molecules, K245-14, successfully prevented the death o
'"/>

Contact: Sue McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital
28-Jul-2006


Page: 1 2

Related medicine news :

1. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
2. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
3. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
4. Study reveals gaps in vaccine financing for underinsured children
5. Study suggests nonpharmaceutical interventions may be helpful in severe influenza outbreaks
6. Study shows radiofrequency ablation highly effective in treating kidney tumors
7. Study says normal but out-of-control enzyme may be culprit that signals some cells to become cancer
8. Study finds HIV protease inhibitor drugs may adversely affect the scaffolding of the cell nucleus
9. Study outlines how stroke, head injury can increase risk of Alzheimers disease
10. Study identifies new regulator of fat metabolism
11. Study shows Diachrome improves blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/29/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 29, 2017 , ... The quest ... question: How do doctors determine if someone is cured? The virus has a knack ... expensive and time-consuming tests. , Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of ...
(Date:5/28/2017)... ... May 28, 2017 , ... Viewers likely know Rob Lowe from ... is also noted for his work on NBC’s The West Wing and Parks and ... the new series “Informed,” which puts the spotlight on important modern-day issues that face ...
(Date:5/27/2017)... ... ... Most us are familiar with the sound of occasional popping joints that ... shows that certain people who experience consistent joint popping, grating and grinding are ... opportunity to treat patients before the problem becomes pronounced, potentially hedging off more severe ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... Amir Qureshi, MD is the first physician in ... cord stimulation system. The Nuvectra™ Algovita SCS System has been FDA approved as a ... first in Arkansas to introduce the most powerful SCS system and the only stretchable ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... MA (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2017 , ... On ... Act (AHCA), which narrowly passed the U.S. House on May 4, would result in ... be expected under continued implementation of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/6/2017)... -- May is Stroke Awareness Month and Omron Healthcare is ... to prevent a stroke: monitor and manage your blood ... Prevention, undetected and uncontrolled hypertension is a leading risk ... in personal heart health technology, recently evolved its mission ... stroke and is advancing a national public education effort ...
(Date:5/4/2017)... and SAN DIEGO , May 4, ... (ACOG) 2017 Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting— OBP Medical ... medical devices, today announced the launch of a new ... OfficeSPEC and ER-SPEC vaginal specula. Already ... extra-small and extra-large sizes makes OBP Medical,s line of ...
(Date:5/3/2017)...  Kalorama Information notes that transplant diagnostics is ... and this is projected to continue to 2021. ... or bone marrow transplants require histocompatibility between the ... this task. This according to a new report ... various PCR-based methodologies, Sanger sequencing and NGS used ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: