HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Study in Science holds promise for a new approach to drug therapy

Researchers believe they have found a way to change the action of 60 percent of currently available medications, in some cases making them many times more effective, according to an article published in the April 21 edition of the journal Science. The discovery has the potential to improve treatments for diseases including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, depression and arthritis. The study describes a new way to manipulate perhaps the most important signaling mechanism in human cells: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs).

Human cells must be able to send signals that switch life processes on and off as they react to the nutrients, toxins, hormones and even the light particles they are exposed to. GPCRs are a key part of such signaling cascades, passing on messages that make vision possible, carry nerve messages, enable white blood cells to attack infection and set the timing of the heartbeat. Faulty GPCR signaling, on the other hand, plays a key role in several major diseases. As a result, GCPRs are targeted by 12 of the top 20 selling drugs, including Coreg for congestive heart failure, Cozaar for high blood pressure, Zoladex for breast cancer, Buspar for anxiety and Clozaril for schizophrenia, as well as by Zantac and Claritin. Together the drug class accounts for $200 billion in annual sales.

Authors of the current study believe they have found a new way to regulate the same GCPR pathways, but at different points. Where most drugs change the behavior of GPCRs on the outside of cells, the new class of drugs seeks to influence related signaling on the inside. Early studies suggest that the newly discovered "drug candidates" can provide better control of pathways involved in pain relief, inflammation and heart disease, while leaving healthy functions in place.

"We believe we have discovered a new class of drugs that could make current drugs more effective, but that also represents a completely new, independent way of treating the same diseas
'"/>

Contact: Greg Williams
Greg_Williams@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-1757
University of Rochester Medical Center
20-Apr-2006


Page: 1 2 3 4 5

Related medicine news :

1. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
2. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
3. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
4. Study reveals gaps in vaccine financing for underinsured children
5. Study suggests nonpharmaceutical interventions may be helpful in severe influenza outbreaks
6. Study shows radiofrequency ablation highly effective in treating kidney tumors
7. Study says normal but out-of-control enzyme may be culprit that signals some cells to become cancer
8. Study finds HIV protease inhibitor drugs may adversely affect the scaffolding of the cell nucleus
9. Study outlines how stroke, head injury can increase risk of Alzheimers disease
10. Study identifies new regulator of fat metabolism
11. Study shows Diachrome improves blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/19/2019)... ... ... Residents in long-term-care nursing facilities were prescribed fewer medications when treated by staff ... of U.S. men and women led by the staff at the Los Angeles ... The quality assurance study examined the high number of prescriptions ordered for long-term nursing ...
(Date:4/19/2019)... ... April 19, 2019 , ... The Patient Advocacy Community of ... Health Network-CVPH, Plattsburgh, NY with the 2019 Ruth Ravich Patient Advocacy Award in ... fellow patient advocates. Doyle was honored with the award at The Beryl Institute’s ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... 2019 , ... Swiss Pet company PerAnimal launches a new unique ... between human and animal while improving the overall wellness of pet companions. , All ... of experience. They are made by hand from organic Swiss herbal condensate and Swiss ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... April 18, 2019 , ... ... upscale dental practice in Beverly Hills that offers a full menu of cosmetic ... cosmetic treatments and sought-after expertise in biomimetic dentistry, which relies on minimally-invasive techniques ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... April 18, 2019 , ... WHAT:, Patients today have ... Through the rise of online review sites and healthcare-related searches on the web, ... making important purchasing decisions online. In order to elevate a health system’s reputation ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2019)... ... 18, 2019 , ... Janice F. Whaley has a vision. A vision to make organ ... Ms. Whaley has focused her entire career on the mission of all the organ ... donation for transplantation. , There is a sad reality for the individuals who wait for ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... ... , ... MedMen – a cannabis retailer credited with redefining the ... – has partnered with Buxton to identify its most valuable customers and guide site ... tools will allow MedMen to identify their best target markets and strategically plan where ...
(Date:4/18/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... April 18, 2019 , ... ... defining Key Results™, shaping Cultural Beliefs®, and solving Accountability Gaps, and that is ... in the Suntiva team as a service provider to the FDA. This ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: