HOME >> MEDICINE >> NEWS
Study shows interruption of antiretroviral therapy increases risk of disease and death

Findings from one of the largest HIV/AIDS therapy studies conducted to date show that a specific strategy of interrupting antiretroviral therapy more than doubles the risk of AIDS or death from any cause. Researchers affiliated with the Mailman School of Public Health and Harlem Hospital Hospital led a large multi-center international study, known as Strategies for Management of Anti-Retroviral Therapies, or SMART, comparing two treatment strategies for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Findings from the study, published in the November 30 New England Journal of Medicine, demonstrate the value of continuous antiretroviral therapy.

As HIV/AIDS has evolved into a chronic disease without a cure, lifelong antiretroviral therapy has become the norm. Lifelong therapy, however, can be difficult to adhere to as well as expensive. For these reasons, there has been a concerted research effort to test treatment interruption strategies that may enhance patients' quality of life and limit adverse drug effects.

The strategies evaluated in the SMART Study compared the recommended continuous use of antiretroviral therapy (anti-HIV medicines) with use of antiretroviral therapy in an episodic (interrupted) manner. The study found that the use of episodic antiretroviral therapy was inferior to continuous therapy as episodic therapy significantly increased the risk of opportunistic diseases or death from any cause. Further, episodic antiretroviral therapy did not reduce the risk of serious complications, including those related to the heart, kidneys, and liver.

Antiretroviral therapy in people with HIV is associated with remarkable benefits including longer survival and less illness. However, life-long treatment is difficult and can be associated with both short- and long-term risks, such as major metabolic and cardiovascular complications and built-up resistance to treatment. According to Wafaa El-Sadr, MD, MPH, co-chair of the SMART Study and profess
'"/>

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health
30-Nov-2006


Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
2. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
3. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
4. Study reveals gaps in vaccine financing for underinsured children
5. Study suggests nonpharmaceutical interventions may be helpful in severe influenza outbreaks
6. Study shows radiofrequency ablation highly effective in treating kidney tumors
7. Study says normal but out-of-control enzyme may be culprit that signals some cells to become cancer
8. Study finds HIV protease inhibitor drugs may adversely affect the scaffolding of the cell nucleus
9. Study outlines how stroke, head injury can increase risk of Alzheimers disease
10. Study identifies new regulator of fat metabolism
11. Study shows Diachrome improves blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... A man who has struggled to quit smoking, a man who ... was determined to find solutions to his problems – and he did. Now Nabat, a ... ready to introduce his breakthrough inventions to the world and better people's lives. His own ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... metro area, has selected the latest beneficiary of their ongoing community enrichment program. ... preventing bullying in area schools. Donations are now being accepted at: http://www.angelsanddoves.com/donate.html ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Eating disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) ... men with eating disorders report a history of trauma, research suggests that it ... eating disorder. , At the 2016 iaedp Symposium, the workshop, “What Eating ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... TopConsumerReviews.com recently awarded their ... removal products. , Moles are derived from a cluster of melanin when exposed to ... wrong places and create a lifetime of embarrassment. Historically, mole removal has ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... prolapse with the latest techniques and the most minimally invasive approaches. , Women ... prolapse, particularly after menopause. Other risk factors include surgery to the pelvic floor, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... 2016 In a historic vote among its members this weekend, ... medical cannabis cultivation facility and dispensary on tribal land near ... as a provider for patients in the state,s Medical Cannabis Program. ... a provider for patients in the state,s Medical Cannabis Program. ... the project and pursue designation from the State of New ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... BASEL , Switzerland and PALO ALTO, Calif. ... leader in biological and chemical manufacturing, and Kodiak Sciences ... for the treatment of retinal disease, announced today agreements ... the agreement, Lonza will manufacture material at multiple sites, ... --> --> Retinal ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... -- Aoxing Pharmaceutical Company, Inc. (NYSE MKT: AXN) today announced that ... 31, 2015, the Company achieved revenue of $8,195,839, a 27% ... in fiscal 2015. --> --> ... 2016 was $2,068,635, or $.03 per share, up 265% from ... the Q2 of fiscal year 2015. Gross margin for the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: