UIC developing drug for SARS

A prototype drug created by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago shows promise in slowing replication of the virus responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS.

Currently, there are no effective antiviral agents or vaccines for SARS, which killed almost 800 people in an epidemic in 2002-2003.

On the basis of their success, the researchers have received an $8 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop protease inhibitors that would block key enzymes in the SARS virus and hamper its advance. Protease inhibitors, a class of drugs capable of disrupting enzymes that digest proteins, have been successfully used to thwart the human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS.

"Data from SARS patients indicate that replication of the virus peaks 10 days after the onset of fever," said Michael Johnson, director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology in the UIC College of Pharmacy and the study's principal investigator. "By administering protease inhibitors early, when feverish symptoms have started, the drugs could reduce the viral load and ameliorate the disease."

Like HIV, the SARS virus multiplies rapidly, hijacking the machinery of the cells it infects to clone itself over and over again.

One of the first steps in that process is the production of a long chain of proteins, all of which are needed for the virus to propagate. Two enzymes, or proteases, clip the chain to release the individual proteins, the parts needed to assemble a mature virus.

These two proteases -- called 3CLpro and PLpro -- are UIC's targets for drug therapy.

"If we can block 3CLpro and probably PLpro, then we can stop the SARS virus from replicating," Johnson said.

Under the grant, Andrew Mesecar, associate professor of pharmacy, will study details of the three-dimensional structure of the two enzymes using x-ray crystallography.

His technique invol

Contact: Sharon Butler
University of Illinois at Chicago

Page: 1 2 3

Related medicine news :

1. Program announced to improve care in developing areas for patients with blood disorders
2. Caring for the sick now a public health priority for developing countries
3. Over time, more women are developing MS than men
4. Addressing the neglect of childhood hearing impairment in developing countries
5. First step in developing heart hormone-based pill to control high blood pressure
6. USC-led study suggests exercise reduces risk of developing invasive breast cancer
7. Cells passed from mother to child may be first step in developing new treatments for type 1 diabetes
8. Tuberculosis risks for health workers in developing countries
9. Global strategies to improve health in developing countries need truly global discussions
10. Adolescent smokers have a greater risk of developing alcohol-use disorders than nonsmokers
11. Measuring brain activity for emotional markers that may indicate risk for developing alcoholism

Post Your Comments:

(Date:11/28/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 28, 2015 , ... Trying to ... has created the COUCH BUDDY. "I conceived of this design due to personal experience ... for couch users. It promotes relaxation and convenience, as well as increases support. It ...
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... ... Pixel Film Studios is back again with ProPanel: Pulse . With ... Users have full control over angle of view, speed method, start point, end point, ... get heads to turn. , ProPanel: Pulse offers fully customizable pulsating shape masks, all ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... According to an ... recent 2015 American Dental Association meeting in Washington D.C. revolved around the fact that ... patient’s overall health. The talk stressed the link between periodontal disease (more commonly referred ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... According to an ... changing the way that they are handling security in light of the recent terrorist ... presence in an attempt to stop an attack from reaching U.S. soil. Especially around ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... NC (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... A ... effective ways to treat it. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted the findings on ... at University Hospital Zurich analyzed the cases of 136 mesothelioma patients who were treated ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/27/2015)... YORK , November 27, 2015 ... system is set to go online. The potential to ... processes is vast and far from fully exploited as ... to patient health records, either via mobile tablet or ... ) --> http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151127/291357 ) --> ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/8v9x5q/2016_global_tumor ) ... "2016 Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier ... Segment Forecasts, Innovative Technologies, Instrumentation Review, Competitive ... offering. --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/8v9x5q/2016_global_tumor ) has ... Global Tumor Marker Testing Market: Supplier Shares ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... Netherlands , November 26, 2015 ... A new combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic ... A new combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy ... A new combination approach blends immunotherapy with Bremachlorin-photodynamic therapy ... Netherlands has found that immunotherapy can be ...
Breaking Medicine Technology:
Cached News: