Tag: "agi" at biology news

Alzheimer's disease is not accelerated aging

Certain brain changes that are common in normal aging are not the beginnings of Alzheimer's disease. Recent research by cognitive aging experts suggests that changes related to Alzheimer's disease appear in distinct regions of the brain and reflect unique pathology compared with changes that occur in older adults without dementia. ... ..."We're getting a better understanding of the complex const...

Washington University in St. Louis leads group studying aging process

A research team of biologists and engineers led by faculty at Washington University in St. Louis is seeking to find the Fountain of Youth not in Florida, but in photosynthetic cyanobacteria (ancient little blue-green algae). Looking at the cellular systems in cyanobacteria, and then in a model plant and a moss species, these researchers want to determine how these organisms protect themselves...

New imaging technology at Joslin shown to detect early signs of type 1 diabetes

BOSTON - By the time overt symptoms of type 1 diabetes appear in an individual, destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas has already progressed significantly. However, findings by researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center and Massachusetts General Hospital, published in the Aug. 24 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that a powerful new imaging techno...

Trojan Horses, xenon imaging and remote controlled genes

PHILADELPHIA As our understanding of biology increases, the tools of research become almost as important as the researchers wielding them. Currently, one of the major obstacles to research is actually getting inside of cells and tissue to see what is going on as it happens. ... ...At the University of Pennsylvania, researchers are caging molecules xenon, gene-blocking strands of antisense DNA...

Managing occupational exposures to potential bioterrorist agents

Laboratories working with biological threat agents must develop comprehensive programs in order to minimize the risk of occupational exposures, according to investigators at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID).... ...In an article published this month in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Janice M. Rusnak, M.D. and colleagues at USAMRIID...

Despite darkness, nocturnal bees learn visual landmarks while foraging at night

Day-active bees, such as the fabled honeybee, are well known for using visual landmarks to locate a favoured patch of flowers and to find their way back to their hive. Researchers have now found that nocturnal bees can do the same thing, despite experiencing light intensities that are more than 100 million times dimmer than daylight. The new findings, reported by a team led by Eric Warrant of the...

Small animal imaging gives cancer clues

Advances in biomedical imaging are allowing UC Davis researchers to...use mice more effectively to study cancers comparable to human...disease. The system can distinguish different stages of cancer and...could lead to more sensitive screening tests for cancer-fighting...drugs. ... ...Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for detecting and...following cancer in human patients. It works...

Computer imaging of Archeopteryx skull suggests this dinosaur-bird link could fly

AUSTIN, Texas Using computer imaging to model a fossil of an ......"This animal had huge eyes and a huge vision region in its brain to go along with that, and a great sense of balance," said Dr. Timothy Rowe. "Its inner ear also looks very much like the ear of a modern bird."... ...Rowe co-directs the university's High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (UTCT) facility, where h...

Lake research offers clues to managing crayfish invasions

PORTLAND - Rusty crayfish, an invasive species now crawling across the rocky bottoms of lakes and streams throughout the United States and Canada, may not always have a stronghold once they enter these bodies of water. ... ...The findings, part of an ongoing study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, suggest that the type of interaction among rusty crayfish, fish and aquatic plants may tip the...

UNC researchers awarded $8.65 million from National Institute on Aging

CHAPEL HILL A team of scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has been awarded a federal grant of $8.65 million to investigate the molecular basis of blood vessel aging and its role in the development of vascular disease, including heart attack.... ...The five-year grant comes from the National Institute on Aging, a component of the National Institu...

Fluid derived from aloe plant prolongs life after hemorrhagic shock in animal study

PITTSBURGH, July 26 A novel resuscitation fluid derived from aloe vera that was developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine has the potential to save the lives of patients with massive blood loss, according to results of an animal study published in the August edition of the medical journal Shock. The findings could have a significant i...

Imaging the healing heart

Being able to visualize the healing of damaged tissue after a heart attack is vital for obtaining appropriate therapies for heart patients. Albert Sinusas and colleagues, from Yale University School of Medicine, have now developed a noninvasive method for imaging this process. Following a heart attack, new blood vessels are formed during the healing and remodeling process. In order to encourage...

Whole body imaging allows better understanding of the immune system

New whole body positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques are allowing scientists to actually watch as immune system cells find and respond to tumors or infection. Compared to the snapshot views of the immune system from tumor biopsies or blood assays, this whole body imaging allows scientists to track how the immune response changes, and the tumor or infection responds, throughout the...

Carnegie Mellon enhances Quantum Dot Corp. technology for long-term, live-animal imaging

PITTSBURGH-- By modifying the surface of tiny, fluorescent crystals called quantum dots, Carnegie Mellon University scientists have enabled them to circulate for hours in animals and to provide fluorescent signals for at least eight months, the longest that anyone has observed quantum dot fluorescence in a living animal. This technological feat overcomes a major limitation, making quantum dots fi...

AGI announces the winners of Earth Science Week 2003 contests

The American Geological Institute is proud to announce the winners of the Earth Science Week 2003 contests. The contests are designed to encourage students and the public to participate in this annual celebration that recognizes the importance of Earth sciences in our lives. The most recent contests included an art contest for elementary-school children, an essay contest for secondary-school stud...

Modern global warming more damaging than in the past

ANN ARBOR, Mich.---Global warming isn't what it used to be....... "Some people will tell you that the planet has warmed in the past and that species always managed to adapt, so there's no cause for alarm. Unfortunately that's not the case," said Johannes Foufopoulos, assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment. Foufopoulos says new research illust...

Gastric emptying for specific foods may be key to managing deadly illnesses in elderly

April 22, 2003 (Bethesda, MD) -- The rate of gastric emptying is a major measure of the glucose and cardiovascular responses to oral carbohydrates. The former is key to the dietary management of people with diabetes mellitus, in whom strict control of blood glucose has been shown to reduce microvascular complications. As cardiovascular responses are relevant to the prevention of postprandial hy...

The magic behind merlin

A new study reveals an essential role for the merlin protein in maintaining the junctions between cells a significant advance in understanding the tumor suppressor function of this protein, and how mutations in the gene that encodes it can contribute to cancer. ...... The report is published by Dr. Andrea McClatchey and colleagues at the MGH Cancer Center (Charlestown, MA) and INSERM (Paris, Fr...

How aging cells retire

As we grow older, our hair turns gray, our bones grow thin and, among other changes, our telomeres shrink. But, more than markers of the passage of time, telomeres, the tips of chromosomes, may harbor answers to the fundamental mechanisms of aging and cancer. ...... Now, in the March 29 issue of Science, Rockefeller University researchers propose how these molecular clocks may ultimately count d...

Article series aims to educate on the truth of anti-aging claims

As part of a summer effort to present peer-reviewed research on the truth of anti-aging medicine, The Gerontological Society of America has released the first of two special sections in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological and Medical Sciences (Vol. 59A, No. 6). ......Supervised by guest editors S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, Leonard Hayflick, PhD, and Thomas T. Perls, MD, MPH, this issue focuses on t...

Gerontology researchers urge scrutiny of anti-aging treatments

Consumers must be afforded better protection against interventions falsely claiming to reverse or retard the aging process, according to an article published by legal and medical professionals in the June issue of The Gerontologist (Vol. 44, No. 3).... ...The team of researchers, based at Case Western Reserve University, urge professional organizations to undertake a sustained program of specific...

Innovative efforts target epigenetics, molecular imaging

BETHESDA, Md., Mon., June 28, 2004 - The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), today announced it has awarded two new grants to establish Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS) at Harvard Medical School in Boston and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.... ...The Harvard and Johns Hopkins centers, like...

Carnegie Mellon U. imaging study reveals sex-based differences that persist as mice enter adulthood

Using advanced imaging technology, Carnegie Mellon University scientist Eric Ahrens and co-investigators have conducted the first systematic examination of developmental and sex-associated changes in adolescent and adult mouse brains to reveal fundamental differences in key brain structures, such as those important for emotions, learning, and memory. The results, in press with NeuroImage, show th...

New public policy & aging report highlights facts and fiction about anti-aging medicine

Can the aging process be decelerated or reversed and, if so, should it be? This scientific and moral quandary is investigated in detail in the Spring 2004 issue of the Public Policy & Aging Report, the quarterly publication of the National Academy on an Aging Society.... ...This installment of PP&AR includes 6 articles that address the scientific debates, social consequences, and ethical issues a...

Damaged genes in aging human brain provide clues to cognitive decline

Unraveling the mysteries of the aging brain is a major goal for brain science, especially given the exploding population of senior citizens and the obvious desire to preserve brain function as long as possible. Now, researchers at Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School have uncovered a kind of genetic signature associated with the aging human brain that may contribute to cognitive...

Researchers establish first molecular link between eating and aging

Forget the drastic reduction in carbs and calories called for by diet dictators. The day when people can eat their favorite foods, stay thin and live to be 120 without getting age-induced diabetes or cancer may be nearer than we think. Researchers at MIT believe they've found the key to a long, lean, healthy life in a single protein that controls whether a mammal stores fat or sheds it. ... The w...

Biology of aging

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- When the chemical messages sent by an insulin-like hormone are reduced inside the fat cells of the fruit fly, the fly's lifespan increases significantly, according to new research conducted at Brown University....... A similar phenomenon has already been observed in worms, according to Brown biology professor Marc Tatar. But never before, Tatar says, has it been seen in fruit...

3-D micro-imaging technology licensed to Carl Zeiss Jena

NEW YORK -- Biomedical microscopic imaging deep inside living tissue with unprecedented clarity could become routine and widely available with the signing of technology-transfer and collaborative-research agreements today (May 28, 2004) by Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, a leading maker of microscopy instrumentation, and by CCTEC, the technology, enterprise and commercialization arm of Cornell University.....

Addressing the Healthcare Needs of Our Aging Population with Technology

......... Addressing the Healthcare Needs of Our Aging Population with Technology is a one-day symposium designed to focus on the role of computer, communication and other electronic technologies to improve the quality and cost-efficiency of geriatric care. Spearheaded by IEEE-USA's Medical Technology Policy Committee and its Geriatric Working Group, four sessions will be held to identify: nee...

Mite transmits viruses damaging to wheat

AMARILLO Looking closely at unhealthy, discolored plants in Texas Panhandle wheat fields is part of Dr. Charles Rush's job. He is a plant pathologist with Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. But the scientist knows the damage isn't drought-induced at all. ... The damage is caused by two different viruses, the wheat streak mosaic and the High Plains, he said. Both are transmitted by the...

Institute for OneWorld Health CEO to speak at BIO on leveraging opportunities for global health

Victoria Hale, founder and CEO of the Institute for OneWorld Health, the first nonprofit pharmaceutical company in the U.S., will speak at the BIO 2004 Annual International Convention in the Global Health track during a breakout session titled Mutually Inclusive: New and Affordable Drugs for Developed, Developing Worlds. ...... The session will highlight how a collaboration among industry, new n...

New insights on sirtuins, involved in gene expression and aging

(PHILADELPHIA) -- In recent years, scientists have become interested in the workings of a family of enzymes called sirtuins, known to play critical roles in a variety of vital life processes, including metabolism, aging, and gene expression. Previous studies, for example, have suggested that low-calorie diets that extend life boost sirtuin activity dramatically, hinting at a link between metabol...

Imaging study shows brain maturing

The brain's center of reasoning and problem solving is among the last to mature, a new study graphically reveals. The decade-long magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of normal brain development, from ages 4 to 21, by researchers at NIH's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shows that such "higher-order" brain centers, such as the prefronta...

SPECT imaging shows promise for accurate, early diagnosis of Alzheimer's

Reston, VA -- Alzheimer's disease (AD) currently afflicts approximately 4.5 million Americans. One of the most feared diseases of old age, AD robs its victims of their memories and personalities long before it takes their lives. Curing or slowing the progress of AD has been a high priority in the scientific community, but an early and accurate diagnosis is equally important given that several ot...

Researchers describe long-perplexing 'magic spot' on bacteria

COLUMBUS, Ohio Scientists have unraveled the behavior of one key component of bacteria, a finding that may lead to better, more effective antibiotics. ......The researchers studied a mechanism of action they call the "magic spot" an important regulator of gene expression. They describe their results in the current issue of the journal Cell. ......Researchers know that the magic spot a molecule...

Gene defect linked to premature aging

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers have identified a gene that, when altered makes cells and animals age prematurely and die. The findings, reported in the May 1 edition of Genes and Development, may provide a new target for therapies that force cancer cells to an early death....... The gene, called PASG (Proliferation Associated SNF2-like Gene), normally works by decreasing the acti...

Imaging the brain solving problems through insight

If you're one of those insufferable people who can finish the Saturday New York Times crossword puzzle, you probably have a gift for insight. The puzzles always have an underlying hint to solving them, but on Saturdays that clue is insanely obtuse. If you had all day, you could try a zillion different combinations and eventually figure it out. But with insight, you'd experience the usual clueless...

Purdue scientists finding ways to outsmart crop-damaging bugs

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A new screening method aimed at boosting pesticide effectiveness may be commercially viable, according to Purdue University researchers. ......The process is designed to identify chemical compounds that could be added to current pesticides to overcome resistance insects have developed to them. In a recent issue of the journal Pesticide Biochemistry & Physiology, the scienti...

New imaging technique developed to identify breast cancer

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have for the first time used a chemical marker detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to successfully diagnose breast cancer. The diagnostic technique produces pictures of choline within breast tumors. ... ...In the study, researchers from the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science at Hopkins demonstrated that...

U Iowa study identifies damaging mechanism in transplants and heart attacks

A University of Iowa study suggests that inhibiting a certain protein involved in inflammation might be of therapeutic benefit in organ transplantation, heart attacks and possibly stroke. The study, led by John Engelhardt, Ph.D., UI professor and interim head of anatomy and cell biology, found that blocking the action of this protein can prevent the tissue damage caused by ischemia/reperfusion in...
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