Tag: "eco" at biology news

Phase II trials of second-generation antisense cancer drug planned following successful early study

Geneva, Switzerland: Phase II trials of the first second-generation antisense cancer drug to be used in patients are soon to be underway in the wake of a successful Phase I study, which has demonstrated that the new drug blocks its target gene in exactly the way it is designed to do....... In the Phase I study the drug OGX-011* inhibited the production of clusterin, a protein that protects cell...

AIBS tapped to coordinate design of ecological observatories

The scientific community's work to create the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) enters a new phase today. With a two-year, $6 million cooperative agreement between the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) and the National Science Foundation now in place, the NEON Design Consortium and Project Office will be set up to develop a blueprint for the network and a plan for its...

Environmental decontamination, greenhouse gases, and the genome of a methane-loving bacterium

Mention greenhouse gases to most people and they're apt to think of carbon dioxide, fossil fuels, and big cars. Though carbon dioxide emissions are the major source of greenhouse gases, methane is far more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere. Like increasing carbon dioxide levels, rising levels of atmospheric methane have been attributed to human activity, mostly in the form of landfills...

Economy of movement

A man in a suit and bowler hat walks awkwardly down the street, each convoluted step a labored movement. He lifts up one knee, then briefly stoops. Stepping forward, he swings the other leg out to the side then kicks high in the air. In this old Monty Python skit, the man works for the Ministry of Silly Walks. It's his job to walk this way. The rest of us, however, tend to stroll along--or throw...

Brown ecologist garners major National Science Foundation grant

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- The National Science Foundation has awarded one of its premier biology grants to Brown University evolutionary ecologist Johanna Schmitt, who will head up a team of researchers examining how environmental cues in different climates affect genes in a single species in this case, an annual weed in the mustard family....... The European native, Arabidopsis thaliana, can be found...

Ecology of infectious diseases grants awarded

Arlington, Va.--The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have announced funding for six projects under the Ecology of Infectious Diseases (EID) program, the fifth year of funding in this multi-year effort. ...The joint program supports efforts to understand the ecological and biological mechanisms that govern relationships between human -induced environmen...

Research on carbohydrate metabolism receives historical recognition

Research by Carl and Gerty Cori exploring how the human body metabolizes glucose will be designated a National Historic Chemical Landmark in a special ceremony at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis on Sept. 21. The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, sponsors the landmarks program. ... ...Beginning in the 1920s, the Coris conducted a series o...

Laboratory grows world record length carbon nanotube

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., September 13, 2004 University of California scientists working at Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with chemists from Duke University have recently grown a world record-length four-centimeter-long, single-wall carbon nanotube. ...Single-wall carbon nanotubes have a number of revolutionary uses, including being spun into fibers or yarns that are more than 10 tim...

Lecture on ecology of infectious diseases

Urbanization results in the fragmentation of native habitats, which dramatically alters the rate of transmission and spread of infectious diseases, scientists are finding. ......Case in point: Native grasslands throughout the western United States are becoming the most rapidly urbanized ecosystems in the country. Black-tailed prairie dogs, an imperiled species in western states, are increasingly...

Wrapping a memory with an experience, capacity for recollection detected in non-human species

(Boston) -- For millennia, the process of memory and remembering has intrigued scholars and scientists. In 350 B.C., Aristotle, in his seminal treatise on the subject, described it as having two forms: familiarity and recollection. Of these, he considered recollection to be a purely human condition. ... ...That tenet is now being challenged by researchers at Boston University. ...... Neurobio...

Second call for proposals for the European Young Investigator Award

The second call for proposals for the European Young Investigator (EURYI) Award, which enables and encourages outstanding young researchers from all over the world, has been announced. This European programme for young researchers is managed and funded by the scientific and research funding organisations under the umbrella of the European Union Research Organisations Heads of Research Councils (E...

$18 million bioinformatics center to become weapon against deadly diseases

A computer database designed to help biomedical scientists identify and exploit the weak spots in scores of deadly microorganisms will be established with an $18 million contract from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health.... ...Overseeing the effort will be the Computation Institute, a joint effort between the University of Chicag...

Better living through urban ecology

Plants influence the quality of urban air. Birds are more diverse in affluent areas. When forest cover declines, E. coli levels rise in suburban streams. These are just a sampling of the findings revealed over the past 7 years by the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES), an interdisciplinary collaboration of over 30 researchers, educators and policy makers working to understand how urban ecosystems fu...

Carnegie Mellon researcher tests tools for protecting Anacostia River ecosystem from PCBs

PITTSBURGH-- A sediment-capping mat developed by Carnegie Mellon engineers and CETCO (Arlington Heights, IL) soaks up dangerous PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and could prevent their long-term release into waterways, according to the researchers, who are evaluating it in field trials in Washington D.C.'s contaminated Anacostia River. ...In hundreds of contaminated waterways across the country,...

Ecologists help keep death off the roads

Far fewer animals would be killed on the roads if planners took the findings of new research into account when designing and building new roads. According to a study published today in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology, it is possible to predict where most animals will attempt to cross roads, and hence where they are most likely to be killed by vehicles. ...... Researche...

Medication reconciliation, pharmacist involvement vital to reducing medication errors, study finds

CHICAGO Obtaining complete and accurate medication histories of patients and instituting a medication reconciliation program are vital to reducing medication errors, a new study conducted at Northwestern Memorial Hospital has shown. The study demonstrated that when hospital pharmacists perform medication reconciliation, taking steps to ensure patients receive the correct medication and accurate...

Evolution of whale hearing unfolds in fossil record

Arlington, Va.--An international team of scientists has traced the evolution of hearing in modern cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises). "This study of the early evolution of whales demonstrates the changes that took place in whales' outer and middle ears, required for the transition from a land-based to a marine-based existence," said Rich Lane, director of the National Science Foundation...

Afghan sees opportunity in nation's recovery from war

The rebuilding of Afghanistan should be an opportunity to develop sustainable standards and practices in construction and energy production and use, Dr. Pir Mohammed Azizi, deputy minister of Irrigation, Water Resources and Environment, is expected to tell participants in the eighth World Renewable Energy Congress (WREC VIII)....... Dr. Azizi is a plenary speaker at what is likely to be the world...

UC Riverside researcher takes snapshots of the movement of molecules in a billionth of a second

A team of researchers including University of California, Riverside Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Ludwig Bartels has developed a technique to take extremely fast snapshots of molecular and atomic movement. The development is considered a significant advance in surface science, the study of chemical reactions taking place on the surface of solids.... ...The results are reported in the curren...

Gulf of Maine marine ecosystem may have entered new phase

For most of the past 4,500 years, cod was king in the Gulf of Maine's coastal waters. Today, cod have given way to the Jonah crab with potential long-term consequences for coastal fisheries, according to a University of Maine research report published in the journal Ecosystems.... ... With crabs and lobsters at the top of the proverbial heap, the Gulf may have entered a new stable phase marke...

Pocket gophers serve as 'ecosystem engineers'

(Portland, Ore.) Love them or hate them, pocket gophers have an important effect on the soil and plants where they live. They serve as small "ecosystem engineers" generating major impacts on the physical environment....... Jim Reichman, director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara, will present findings on North American pocket gophers, entitl...

Wolf reintroduction reshapes Yellowstone ecology

The 1995 reintroduction of wolves in the northern range of Yellowstone National Park has led to increased growth of willow and cottonwood in the park by causing fear responses in elk and other ungulates, according to William J. Ripple and Robert L. Beschta of Oregon State University in Corvallis. Ripple and Beschta, writing in the August 2004 issue of BioScience, argue that fear of predation when...

Ecologist calls for creation of an international panel to assess human behavior

Stanford University Professor Paul R. Ehrlich is urging fellow ecologists to join with social scientists to form an international panel that will discuss and recommend changes in the way human beings treat one another and the environment....... Ehrlich is scheduled to call for the establishment of a Millennium Assessment of Human Behavior (MAHB) during a speech at the 89th annual meeting of the E...

New study to investigate demise of coral reef ecosystems

Scientists are embarking on a project which will explore how global warming is devastating one of the world's most diverse ecosystems. ...... One sixth of the world's coral reefs died due to bleaching in 1998, and the situation is getting worse. Bleaching occurs when tropical seas heat up above there normal maximums, killing the corals. ...... These events are equally catastrophic for the quarter...

New world record magnet for chemical and biomedical research

Tallahassee, FL The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida, has achieved another world record in magnet development with the successful testing of its 21.1 Tesla, superconducting, ultra-wide bore, NMR magnet. The magnet reached full field on July 21, 2004, and will remain at field for years -- and even decades -- to come. A tea...

NSF awards $10 million in grants to ocean sites for long-term ecological research

Arlington, Va.--Coral reefs and coastal upwelling ecosystems are the subjects of two new Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites awarded funding by the National Science Foundation (NSF). With the addition of the Moorea Coral Reef LTER Site and the California Current Ecosystem LTER Site, there are now 26 NSF-funded sites in the LTER network. The two newest sites will receive approximately $82...

Cutting-edge cancer researchers sought for international recognition

The American Association for Cancer Research now is accepting nominations for the fourth annual Kirk A. and Dorothy P. Landon Foundation-AACR Prizes. ... ...These two major international prizes recognize seminal basic and translational cancer research discoveries at the cutting edge of scientific novelty and significance. Eligible candidates are active, recently published scientists who have made...

Colleagues to recognize research leadership in cancer detection, prevention and treatment

Continuing a 45-year-old tradition of honoring outstanding achievement in cancer research, the American Association for Cancer Research currently is accepting nominations for its series of annual awards. Scientists advancing the understanding and eradication of cancer through basic research, clinical care, therapeutics and prevention are eligible. Winners will help the AACR fulfill its mission...

Report outlines vision and recommendations for microbiology in the 21st Century

Washington, D.C. July 21, 2004 -- Microbes generate more than half the oxygen we breathe, excavate huge underground caverns, contribute mightily to the changes in our climate, and make up the largest mass of living things on earth. It is not an exaggeration to state that they are everywhere and often in very large numbers. Life originated with microbes and all of life is derived from microbes....

Presidential Recognition Awards presented at the 2004 AIUM Annual Convention

Lewis Nelson, III, MD, RDMS, president of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM), announced the winners of the 2004 Presidential Recognition Award during the Board of Governors banquet at the 2004 AIUM Annual Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, on June 22, 2004. ... ...Gary Whitman, MD, and Alfred Abuhamad, MD, were selected as this year's recipients of the award....

Research shows oceans are becoming more acidic

Paris, July 16 The world's oceans are absorbing an unprecedented amount of carbon dioxide (CO ), which is increasing their acidity and possibly threatening the survival many marine species, especially calcifying organisms including corals, shellfish and phytoplankton. According to research presented recently at a symposium organized by UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and the...

Ecology drives the worldwide distribution of human diseases

Mounting evidence suggests that ecological and climatic conditions influence the emergence, spread, and recurrence of infectious diseases. Global climate change is likely to aggravate climate-sensitive diseases in unpredictable ways.... ...Increasingly, public health programs aimed at preventing and controlling disease outbreaks are considering aspects of the ecology of infectious diseases--how h...

Study probes ecosystem of tree holes

If you think your place is a dump, try living in a tree hole: a dark flooded crevice with years of accumulated decomposing leaves and bugs, infested with bacteria, other microbes, and crawling with insect larvae.... A biologist at Washington University in St. Louis has studied the...ecosystem of the tree hole and the impact that three factors predation, resources and disturbance - have o...

One-size-fits-all approach to nutrition recommendations may soon be outdated

Sacramento, CA January 19, 2004 A person's genetic predisposition to develop heart disease and history of hypertension are just as important as gender and age when it comes to determining dietary needs, according to an article in Nutrition Today. "Individualization of Nutrition Recommendations and Food Choices," written by Lori Hoolihan, PhD RD, discusses how a person's biological make-up coupl...

Wolves are rebalancing Yellowstone ecosystem

CORVALLIS, Ore. - The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park may be the key to maintaining groves of cottonwood trees that were well on their way to localized extinction, and is working to rebalance a stream ecosystem in the park for the first time in seven decades, Oregon State University scientists say in two new studies.... The data show a clear and remarkable linkage between...

Energy companies, conservation groups issue biodiversity recommendations for oil & gas development

The Energy and Biodiversity Initiative (EBI), a partnership of four energy companies and five conservation organizations, released its collaborative report, "Energy and Biodiversity: Integrating Biodiversity Conservation into Oil and Gas Development." This report contains recommendations and tools for integrating biodiversity conservation into oil and gas development, and is intended to be a pra...

Pattern recognition method zeroes in on genes that regulate cell's genetic machinery

ARLINGTON, Va.Using a new technique for recognizing patterns in biological databases, a team of U.S. and Israeli computer scientists and geneticists have developed a practical computational method that zeroes in on the genes responsible for controlling the genetic machinery of a cell. ... ...In a paper published online May 12 by Nature Genetics, the researchers from Stanford University and Hebrew...

Texas A&M, Ecor Corp. sign deal to produce health-related proteins

WESLACO Before a plastic surgeon injects collagen into a patient's face to repair damage, smooth out wrinkles, or create more sensual, pouty lips, the patient undergoes skin tests to detect any possible allergies to the collagen. ... That's because the collagen surgeons use is protein derived from either cow or human cadaver collagen. While the risk may be low, the potential nevertheless exist...

UF research: methyl bromide more effective, economical for killing anthrax

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.---As anthrax and other biological weapons continue to be worrisome threats, a University of Florida researcher has found a common pest control agent called methyl bromide is more effective and cheaper than current treatments in eradicating deadly bacterial spores from buildings.... ..."Tests indicate the fumigant used for more than 50 years to control insect pests in buildi...

Genomics, internationally recognized speakers to figure prominently in upcoming symposium

A special symposium, Exploring Medicine in the Post-Genome World, will take place April 19-20 during the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine's Spring Medical Alumni-Medical Center 50th Anniversary celebrations. ...The symposium will be held at the William and Ida Friday Continuing Education Center and in Berryhill Hall on the UNC campus. ...During the 2-day event, nati...
(Date:4/17/2014)... signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may ... cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results ... Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. , The link between ... with so-called high-grade prostate cancer those with a ... presence of the most aggressive and rapidly growing prostate ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... a study published today in PLOS Pathogens , ... malaria is common can mount an immune response to ... avoid repeated bouts of high fever and illness and ... bloodstream. The findings may help researchers develop future interventions ... malaria parasite. , Each year, approximately 200 million cases ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... In a review published in the April issue of ... The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it,s time ... approach to treating sepsis, which kills millions ... Sepsis occurs when molecules released into the bloodstream to ... body. Inflammation is necessary for maintaining good health ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Doctors who treat patients with a severe and ... an agonizing treatment decision. , The drug sirolimus ... relieve shortness of breath. But some patients eventually ... potentially fatal complications following transplantation. , "It,s a ... director of Loyola University Medical Center,s LAM Clinic ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to ... UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the ... stroke-induced brain damage. , A complex and devastating neurological ... primary reason for disability in the U.S. The blood-brain ... blood-borne material into the brain, causing the permanent deficits ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 2Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 3Health News:Study sheds light on how the immune system protects children from malaria 2Health News:Feinstein Institute researcher publishes new perspective on sepsis 2Health News:Patients with rare lung disease face agonizing treatment dilemma 2Health News:Patients with rare lung disease face agonizing treatment dilemma 3Health News:Study IDs new cause of brain bleeding immediately after stroke 2
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