Tag: "ont" at biology news

Student science contest participation influences study, career choices, alumni say

Participation in a national student biotech competition helps determine study and career paths for a large majority of contestants, according to a survey released today to mark National Biotechnology Week in Canada.... ...Almost three-quarters (74%) of 350 past contestants said the Aventis Biotech Challenge (ABC) helped them plan their studies or find vocations in fields such as biotechnology, h...

Scientists discover potential new way to control drug-resistant bacteria

Based on an improved understanding of bacteriophages--viruses that infect bacteria--scientists reporting in the Sept. 23 issue of the journal Nature believe they have discovered a potential new way to control drug-resistant bacteria, an increasingly worrisome public health problem.... ...The new research, funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the Nat...

DuPont scientist named one of the world's top young innovators by MIT's 'Technology Review' Magazine

WILMINGTON, Del., Sept. 21, 2004 DuPont scientist Dr. Maria Petrucci-Samija has been named to the 2004 list of the world's 100 Top Young Innovators by Technology Review, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Magazine of Innovation. ... ...Dr. Petrucci-Samija, 33, represents a growing core of young scientists working on emerging technologies at the DuPont Experimental Station global...

Abstract poster contest finalists announced

(Spokane, WA) --Six finalists were announced in the poster competition at the annual Environmental and Subsurface Science Symposium, hosted by the Inland Northwest Research Alliance (INRA). The finalists include students from Washington State University, Idaho State University, the University of Idaho and the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Students from both INRA and non-INRA universities partic...

Environmental decontamination, greenhouse gases, and the genome of a methane-loving bacterium

Mention greenhouse gases to most people and they're apt to think of carbon dioxide, fossil fuels, and big cars. Though carbon dioxide emissions are the major source of greenhouse gases, methane is far more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere. Like increasing carbon dioxide levels, rising levels of atmospheric methane have been attributed to human activity, mostly in the form of landfills...

DuPont introduces in-home personal protection from dangers of hurricanes

WILMINGTON, Del., Sept. 20, 2004 By integrating advanced science with 200-plus years of safety knowledge, DuPont is introducing its latest safety innovation a residential storm shelter made with DuPont Kevlar that is engineered to help provide residents protection from the dangers of hurricanes. ...... According to weather experts, when a hurricane hits land, its winds can top more than 150...

Algal contact as a trigger for coral disease

Infectious disease epidemics are causing widespread and alarming declines in reef-building coral species, the foundation blocks of coral reef ecosystems. The emergence of these diseases has occurred simultaneously with large increases in the abundance of seaweeds, called macroalgae....... Macroalgae frequently interact with corals, usually by overgrowing them from their edges. In the October issu...

JCI table of contents September 15, 2004

...... A whole range of human muscular and neuromuscular diseases, are caused by mutations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system. The problem is that there are about 120 genes involved in this system, some that are found in the mitochondria, and thus inherited through the mother, and some that are found in the nucleus and are inherited from both the mother and...

DuPont developing new protective suits for military, first responders

WILMINGTON, Del., Sept. 10, 2004 DuPont today announced promising research in the fight against terrorism with the development of protective materials that are resistant to chemical and biological agents. The suits are targeted for use by U.S. soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders. Early feedback from wearers has been positive. ... The U.S. government has awarded nearly $2.5 mil...

Columbia research to examine gene influence on severity of peridontal disease, therapy response

NEW YORK, NY, September 9, 2004 Scientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) are looking into the genetic reasons why individuals experience periodontal disease so differently, and why some respond to treatment more successfully than others. Even with treatment, some patients continue to see deterioration of gum condition and eventual loss of teeth. ... ...The research is part of an...

Proteins show promise for mosquito control

MADISON-Mosquito abatement usually means one thing: blasting the pesky critters with pesticides. Those pesticides, although highly effective, can impair other organisms in the environment. ... Que Lan, insect physiologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her colleagues in the entomology department are working on a new, more targeted approach to mosquito control: inhibiting their abili...

Spontaneous mutation produces new MAO A/B knockout mouse

Bethesda, MD - A combination of luck and scientific curiosity has produced a mouse lacking two isoenzymes, MAO A and MAO B, that have been linked to violent criminal behavior and Parkinson's disease. The MAO A/B knockout mouse should provide an excellent model in which to address the specific roles of these neurotransmitters and their receptors in anxiety and stress-related disorders.... ...The r...

PNNL lands $10.3 million NIH biodefense contract to unlock proteomes of salmonella and pox

RICHLAND, Wash. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has received a $10.3 million biodefense contract from the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Agents (NIAID) to identify the proteins that regulate the bacteria that cause salmonella poisoning and typhoid fever, and the monkey pox virus.... ...The five-year award is the Department of Energy lab's third $10 million National Institut...

Ventilation in bars, casinos doesn't control health risk for hospitality workers

Baltimore, Md. The level of cancer-causing particles is much higher in the air of smoke-filled bars and casinos than on truck-choked highways and city streets, according to the first published comparison of indoor air quality before and after smoke-free workplace legislation. The study, conducted in a casino, six bars and a pool hall in Wilmington, Delaware, is published in the September 2004...

JCI table of contents: 1 September, 2004

EDITOR'S CHOICE:... ... ... ...Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Research has shown that progression of the pre-malignant stages to invasive cervical cancer is associated with the onset of new blood vessel growth called angiogenesis. Using a mouse model of cervical cancer to explore the molecular control of angiogenesis in cancer progression, Douglas Hanaha...

Researchers identify the genome's controlling elements

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (August 26, 2004) -- Scientists have churned out genome sequences for everything from fungi to dogs to chimps, and they won't be letting up any time soon. However, because a genome sequence is little more than a static list of chemicals--like, say, a parts list for a 747 airplane--scientists are increasingly turning their attention to figuring out how living organisms put their g...

Unicellular organisms contribute more nitrogen to ocean that reported earlier

Large, nutrient-poor expanses of the open ocean are getting a substantial nitrogen influx from an abundant group of unicellular organisms that "fix," or chemically alter, nitrogen into a form usable for biological productivity. ... First identified about five years ago, these organisms about 7 microns in diameter are fixing nitrogen at rates up to three times higher than previously reported for...

Trojan Horses, xenon imaging and remote controlled genes

PHILADELPHIA As our understanding of biology increases, the tools of research become almost as important as the researchers wielding them. Currently, one of the major obstacles to research is actually getting inside of cells and tissue to see what is going on as it happens. ... ...At the University of Pennsylvania, researchers are caging molecules xenon, gene-blocking strands of antisense DNA...

Carnegie Mellon scientists reveal ways of studying, resolving PCB contamination in US rivers

PHILADELPHIAThe distribution and movement of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) in the environment has threatened scarce water supplies, ecosystems, tourism and the world's fragile fishing industry. In the three decades since PCB production and use were banned, sediments of many lakes and waterways continue to provide a source of these deadly toxins to the water and ultimately to fish and people....

Pollination find could lead to cordgrass control

The wind transports pollen far less effectively than scientists assumed, according to a new study of invasive Atlantic cordgrass by researchers at UC Davis. This discovery will help control a cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora, that is invading wetlands on the Pacific coast....... Plants including grasses, oaks and pine trees need the wind to carry pollen between plants, fertilizing nascent seeds....

JCI table of contents, 16 August, 2004

... ...Under conditions of stress, molecular mechanisms stop cells from consuming their source of energy, ATP, and trigger them to begin to produce ATP. This is done by inducing cells to stop any biochemical pathways that use energy and by turning on processes that take up glucose and free fatty acids from their surroundings in order to rebuild their ATP reservoir. The main protein involved in...

Two-month study of life in mid-Atlantic yields trove of species, new insights & questions

Exploring life in the mid-Atlantic at various depths down to 4 km (2.5 miles), 60 scientists from 13 ...countries on a two-month expedition have surfaced a wealth of new information and insights, stunning ...images and marine life specimens, several thought to be species never before known to science.... ...Using remotely-operated deep-sea vehicles, hydroacoustics and other technologies for sampl...

UC Riverside researcher takes snapshots of the movement of molecules in a billionth of a second

A team of researchers including University of California, Riverside Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Ludwig Bartels has developed a technique to take extremely fast snapshots of molecular and atomic movement. The development is considered a significant advance in surface science, the study of chemical reactions taking place on the surface of solids.... ...The results are reported in the curren...

JCI table of contents, 2 August, 2004

...... Stroke is the second largest cause of death worldwide and the leading cause of long-term neurological disability. Therapies for stroke victims are improving, but remain hampered by the limited repair capacity of nerves in the brain and the unique properties of brain vasculature. Akihiko Taguchi and colleagues, of the National Cardiovascular Center in Japan, make great strides in providi...

Leptin has layers of control

Leptin is a neurotransmitter that is produced in fat cells and is involved in appetite. Leptin works through the action of several small proteins called neuropeptides, such as thyrotopin-releasing hormon. Many of these neuropeptides are first made in a longer inactive form (called a prohormone) and are subsequently cut into a smaller active form; this is called prohormone processing. While lep...

APS/IUPS launch PHYSIOLOGY bimonthly

BETHESDA, MD (July 30, 2004) The American Physiological Society and the...International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) in August are launching Physiology, a bimonthly journal of invited articles that identify, review and critically discuss the most important research and developments in the broad, integrative science of physiology. ... ...The editor is Dr. Walter Boron, MD, PhD, profess...

NIH renews funding for continued Rb2 tumor suppressing gene research at Temple

Antonio Giordano, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, and co-director of the Center for Biotechnology in Temple University's College of Science and Technology, has been awarded a five-year, $1.68 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue his exploration of the role the tumor suppressing gene Rb2/p130 plays in cance...

Long-term heart damage may result from constant confrontation and defeat

(July 14, 2004) - Bethesda, MD The toughest among us combat soldiers, athletes, or anyone in a high-stress occupation, may claim that they become "hardened" to adversity and defeat. But a new animal study demonstrates that although the body may temporarily adjust to stress, the risk for long-term cardiac problems may be the consequence of daily exposure to confrontation.... ... ... ......

JCI Table of Contents, 15 July 2004

SUMMARIES OF PAPERS IN THIS ISSUE ...Stem Cells Get a Workout ...Female Infertility camp ...Getting to the HAART of Bone Loss ...ApoA-IV has the Guts to Fight Inflammation ...Not by Mutation Identification Alone...... ...Fat Gets Cut Away from Insulin Resistance ...Pulmonary Fibrosis Polarized by Cytokines ...Anuerysms in Allografted aorta ...IDO says Don't to Asthma ...IDO Can Do Anergy ...HCV M...

JCI table of contents, 15 June 2004

......Many potentially effective cancer treatments are undone by the onset of resistance to the treatment. In order to circumvent this problem, D. Gary Gilliland and colleagues, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, have developed a strategy using the latest technologies involving small interfering RNA to enhance cancer treatment even in a situation where drug resistance has developed. Small interf...

AGI announces the winners of Earth Science Week 2003 contests

The American Geological Institute is proud to announce the winners of the Earth Science Week 2003 contests. The contests are designed to encourage students and the public to participate in this annual celebration that recognizes the importance of Earth sciences in our lives. The most recent contests included an art contest for elementary-school children, an essay contest for secondary-school stud...

JCI Table of Contents, January 15 2004

......In the January 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation researchers from Yale University demonstrate that an outer surface protein, OspC, of the organism Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is critical for the organism's ability to invade the tick salivary gland and therefore be transmitted from ticks to humans. ......Lyme disease was first named in 1977, when arthrit...

New treatment to beat severe incontinence

Scientists have developed a potential treatment for severe incontinence that means the millions of sufferers worldwide could one day throw away their incontinence pads.... ...University of Melbourne scientists, who developed the technique, have now licensed the intellectual property to Continence Control Systems International P/L (CCS), an Australian company created to commercialise the technolog...

OHSU researchers discover molecular signaling system controlling aspects of embryonic development

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) have identified a secreted signaling protein that regulates smooth muscle development in fruit flies. In the absence of a protein called "Jelly Belly (Jeb)," primitive smooth muscle cells fail to migrate or differentiate, according to study results published in the October 2 issue of Nature. ...... "Our research shows that Jelly Belly is re...

Scientists find key to ocean bacterium that helps control greenhouse gas

Scientists are a step closer to understanding how the world's oceans influence global warming - as well supply us with the oxygen we breathe....... A study led by Imperial College London has revealed how the most abundant ocean bound photosynthetic bacterium helps control levels of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide....... the researchers provide new detail on how Prochlorococcus cyanobacteria t...

New guidelines can help health officials better predict and control dengue epidemics

Dengue fever, once under control in many tropical areas of the Americas, has now re-emerged. Globally, some 2.5 to 3.0 billion people live in regions where the disease is endemic. In developing countries, the lack of a closed water system and adequate refuse disposal has encouraged the proliferation of water containers that are ideal larval habitats for Aedes aegypti, the mosquito responsible for...

Gene that controls susceptibility to tuberculosis discovered

Montreal, May 13, 2003 Investigators at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) have identified a gene that regulates the susceptibility to tuberculosis. This finding is published in this week's edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....... Tuberculosis, an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, affects approxima...

Health benefits of training mothers in developing countries to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months

Reducing diarrhoeal disease among infants in less-developed countries could be assisted by the imple-mentation of straightforward community-based health programmes to promote exclusive breastfeeding for six months after childbirth, conclude authors of a study in this week's issue of The Lancet....... The WHO recommend exclusive breastfeeding until six months of age for infants in less-developed c...

Researchers identify gene that controls formation of heart chambers

DALLAS April 1, 2002 Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and their colleagues at UT Austin have identified a gene that controls formation of the hearts ventricles a finding that may eventually lead to preventing some of the most lethal heart defects in American children.... ...We found that the gene named Bop is the primary controller in a cascade of genetic events that incl...

Control of intestinal inflammation by PGE2 and its receptor

Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have as a common side effect the ability to damage the lining of the intestine. Since NSAIDs inhibit prostanoid biosynthesis, it is accepted that the gastric complications reflect a protective role of some prostaglandins in suppressing intestinal inflammation and damage. Still, the identity of the relevant prostaglandins has not been...
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