Tag: "rica" at biology news

Highlights of the October 2004 Journal of the American Dietetic Association

... Concerns about the overall health and well-being of America's children continue to rise as the obesity epidemic continues to expand. Many nutrition experts say an increase in soft drink consumption among adolescents coupled with the easy access to soft drinks in school vending machines over the past two decades are contributing factors to excess weight among kids. ... .....

USAID, Conservation International & Starbucks launch Conservation Coffee Alliance in Central America

Seeking to improve the livelihoods of small-scale coffee farmers while conserving the environment, the United States Government, working through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) today joined forces with Conservation International (CI) and Starbucks Coffee Company (Nasdaq: SBUX) to create the Conservation Coffee Alliance. ...... With a focus on Central America and Me...

DuPont introduces in-home personal protection from dangers of hurricanes

WILMINGTON, Del., Sept. 20, 2004 By integrating advanced science with 200-plus years of safety knowledge, DuPont is introducing its latest safety innovation a residential storm shelter made with DuPont Kevlar that is engineered to help provide residents protection from the dangers of hurricanes. ...... According to weather experts, when a hurricane hits land, its winds can top more than 150...

The American Phytopathological Society announces 2004 awards

St. Paul, Minn. (September 16, 2004) - The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is pleased to announce its 2004 award recipients. These awards were presented at the APS Annual Meeting, August 2004, in Anaheim, Calif.... ...APS grants the Fellow designation to current members in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology or to the Society. The 10 members named Fellows in the...

Tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology

... ...Cranberry and oregano extracts combined with lactic acid may inhibit the growth of bacteria in meat and fish say researchers from Massachusetts. Their findings appear in the September 2004 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. ... ...Listeria monocytogenes, the cause of many food-borne illnesses throughout North Ameri...

USC study links historical increases in life span to lower childhood exposure to infection

Starting in the mid-1850s, humans began living longer due, researchers believe, to improvements in living conditions, nutrition, income levels and medicine.... ...But two USC gerontologists have found an invisible cause that could have important implications for modern-day health care.... ...In a paper published in the Sept. 17 issue of the journal Science, Caleb Finch and Eileen Crimmins firm...

Research on carbohydrate metabolism receives historical recognition

Research by Carl and Gerty Cori exploring how the human body metabolizes glucose will be designated a National Historic Chemical Landmark in a special ceremony at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis on Sept. 21. The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, sponsors the landmarks program. ... ...Beginning in the 1920s, the Coris conducted a series o...

Highlights of American Chemical Society national meeting in Philadelphia, Aug. 22-26

... ...PHILADELPHIA -- Advancements in national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific soci...

Protein fishing in America: The movie

PHILADELPHIA--Proteins pass messages to other proteins much like fly-fishermen flicker their lines against water, or so a current leading theory holds. The repeated weak slapping of protein surfaces against one-another is the critical first step in a chain of events that rule all subsequent cellular behavior....... But this vital exchange between single molecules has defied direct observation bec...

Visiting African scientists collaborate with MBL scientists on infectious diseases

Over the next few months, two African scientists will be collaborating with researchers in the MBL's Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution to help further the world's understanding of infectious diseases, which are responsible for one third of all human deaths each year. ... ...The visiting scientists, called the Ellison Visiting Scholars, are here to take adva...

NIH roadmap for biomedical research focus of chemists at American Chemical Society meeting

PHILADELPHIA As part of an effort to identify opportunities and gaps in biomedical research defined by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap for Medical Research, Jeremy M. Berg, director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, will discuss the role of chemists at the 228 national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the worlds largest scientific society.... ...Dr. Berg...

Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology

......Researchers from Maryland have developed a new DNA vaccine that targets proteins expressed in cervical cancer cells. Their findings appear in the August 2004 issue of the Journal of Virology. ......Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in more than 99 % of cervical cancer cases, which is the second leading cause of cancer death among women throughout the world. Consistently identified in H...

For Africa's valuable mahoganies, it's the soil, stupid

NEW YORK (AUG. 10, 2004) A study by a scientist from the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society has revealed how Africa's giant mahoganies, the ancient trees driving the tropical logging industry, require specialized, poorly understood soil conditions results that could have huge implications on how Africa's tropical forests are managed. ...The study, appearing in the latest issue of the...

Genetic mutation linked to more aggressive breast cancer found more often in African-Americans

Alterations in a tumor suppressor gene called p53 are more prevalent in breast cancer of African-American women than white women, according to a new study. This study, published August 9, 2004 in the online edition of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, "represents the first reported series of increased prevalence of p53 alterations in African-American breast cancer pa...

More aggressive breast cancer tumors found in African American women

New Haven, Conn.--A genetic mutation related to a more aggressive form of breast cancer occurs four times more often in African American patients than their white counterparts, Yale researchers report in the August 9, 2004 online edition of the journal ...Cancer....... In the United States, African-American women have a lower incidence of breast cancer than white women, but they have a higher mor...

American Society of Mammalogists honors CI president Russell Mittermeier with Aldo Leopold award

Washington, DC (July 29, 2004) Conservation International President Dr. Russell A. Mittermeier was awarded the second annual Aldo Leopold Award from the American Society of Mammalogists (ASM), CI announced today. The ASM created the award to honor individuals who have made outstanding and lasting contributions to the conservation of mammals and their habitats. In a written statement to the recip...

Scientists discover new intricacies in how ulcer bugs stick to stomach

St. Louis, July 22, 2004 Scientists working to develop a vaccine for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the primary cause of ulcers and a contributor to stomach cancers, have uncovered new intricacies in the way the bacterium sticks to the lining of the human stomach.... ...A multinational team of researchers showed that babA, a protein that helps H. pylori stay in the stomach, has evolve...

Tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology

... ...Filmy residue, or "soap scum", on household shower curtains may be a breeding ground for potentially harmful bacteria say researchers from San Diego State University, California, University of Colorado at Boulder, and Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Their findings appear in the July 2004 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.... ..."One househol...

Most Americans not sure about the sources of high cholesterol

Dallas, July 14, 2004 - Results from a recent nationwide survey showed that most respondents did not know that high cholesterol comes from two sources, even though the respondents reported having high cholesterol. When asked about the sources of cholesterol, more than three-quarters of respondents (77 percent) stated incorrectly that the food they eat contributes the most to high cholesterol....

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology meets in Boston

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology will hold its 2004 annual meeting this year in concert with the 8th Annual Conference of the International Union for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, rather than joining the multi-specialty Experimental Biology as ASBMB frequently does. For five days, scientists from across the United States and the world will present the latest re...

American Phytopathological Society accepting technical submissions for 2004 Annual Meeting

St. Paul, Minn. The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is now accepting applications for poster and oral presentations for the 2004 APS Annual Meeting, July 31 August 4, 2004, at the Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, California.... ...The APS annual meeting is the primary education and networking event for more than 1,500 scientists from around the world who are devoted to the study...

Tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology

...... Researchers from the University of Washington, Seattle and the University of Alaska Fairbanks have found bacterial activity in arctic wintertime sea ice and may attribute its survival to particle or surface attachment. Their findings appear in the January 2004 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology....... Previous studies pertaining to bacterial activity in sea ice h...

Team approach works better to reduce blood pressure in African-American men

A three-year Johns Hopkins study led by a nurse investigator has found that it may take a "village" to significantly lower the blood pressure of urban African-American men. "The traditional one-on-one doctor-patient visit in a doctor's office will simply not work," says lead author Martha N. Hill, Ph.D., R.N., dean of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. "What our study suggests is tha...

Africa's richest wildlife region under new threats

Stretching through six countries of Eastern Africa, the Albertine Rift contains more than 7,500 species of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and plants--only the tip of the iceberg for the area's total biodiversity, according to a new report by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and its regional collaborators. However, the authors warn that Rift is in dire need of a comprehensive conserv...

Spinal cord injury and Alzheimer's risk among topics at American Chemical Society meeting

ORLANDO, Fla. More than 6,500 cutting-edge research findings will be presented at the 223rd national meeting of the American Chemical Society, April 7-11, in Orlando. Nearly 11,000 scientists are expected to attend the meeting, which will be held at the Orange County Convention Center. ... ...Highlights include:... ... ... ... ... ... Nurturing partnerships with t...

American Chemical Society media registration

Media registration is now open for the 228th national meeting of the American Chemical Society August 22-26 in Philadelphia. ... ...Media can apply for credentials online at:... ... ...General information about the meeting is available at:... http://center.acs.org/applications/ccs/app...

Highlights of the July Journal of the American Dietetic Association

The July 2004 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association contains articles and research studies you may find of interest. Below is a summary of some of this month's articles. For more information or to receive a faxed copy of a Journal article, call Kelly Liebbe at 800-877-1600, ext. 4769 or e-mail ....... ...... According to the Centers for Diseas...

Satellites map volcanic home of Africas endangered gorillas

"It's very exciting to get a look at some of the products we're going to be able to take into the field in future," remarked Maryke Gray, regional monitoring officer of the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP). "The area covered is a volcanic massif that is often difficult to access; what maps of it are available are more than three decades old and often inaccurate, and we have no...

The first domesticated donkey was born in Africa

This release is also available in ... An international team of researchers, with the participation of UAB professor, Jordi Jordana, has published in Science magazine the results of their investigation into the origins of the domesticated donkey. The authors have discovered by using genetic analysis that the domesticated donkey originated in northeastern Africa approximately 5,000 years ago, quit...

National Academies Advisory: June 25 UN public briefing on agriculture in Africa

Africa is rich in both natural and human resources, yet nearly 200 million of its people are undernourished because of inadequate food supplies. Strategies are needed across the continent to marshal the power of science and technology in ways that boost agricultural productivity and sustainability, says a new report from the InterAcademy Council, an international group of science academies that...

Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology

... ...Medium-chain fatty acids may be effective at controlling Salmonella bacteria in chickens say researchers from Belgium and the Czech Republic. Their findings appear in the June 2004 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.... ...The leading cause of food-borne infections in humans, Salmonella bacteria is most commonly associated with poultry. Currently,...

NASA data shows hurricanes help plants bloom in 'ocean deserts'

Whenever a hurricane races across the Atlantic Ocean, chances are phytoplankton will bloom behind it. According to a new study using NASA satellite data, these phytoplankton blooms may also affect the Earth's climate and carbon cycle. ... ...Dr. Steven Babin, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins University in Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland studied 13 North Atlantic hurricanes between 1998 a...

Ecosystem bounces back from hurricanes

After receiving the brunt of powerful hurricanes in 1996 and 1999, the Neuse River and Estuary and western Pamlico Sound in eastern North Carolina appear to have suffered few long-term ill effects from the storms, and have actually benefited ecologically in some ways from the storms' scouring effects.... ...Those are the findings of a team of North Carolina State University scientists and collabo...

Two dinosaurs from Africa give clues to continents' split

The fossil skull of a wrinkle-faced, meat-eating dinosaur whose cousins lived as far away as South America and India has emerged from the African Sahara, discovered by a team led by University of Chicago paleontologist Paul Sereno. The find provides fresh information about how and when the ancient southern continents of Africa, South America and India separated.... ...The new species, which is...

Tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology

...... ....... Commonly used as a co-disinfectant in swimming pools and hospital hot water systems since the mid-1800's, silver has been somewhat effective at bactericidal activity with little or no harmful side...

Pearly mussels: One of North America's natural jewels is disappearing

If you have spent time boating or fishing in freshwater, there is a good chance you have encountered a pearly mussel. Elliptical in shape, with iridescent inner shells, humans have appreciated the animals since prehistoric times. Coveted for their pearls and mother-of-pearl shells; their meat has been a resource for both humans and wildlife. In a BioScience paper published this week, a team of sc...

Biolubricants smooth way to a cleaner environment

EDMONTON (May 10, 2004) -- The Alberta Research Council (ARC), under a contract to Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (AAFRD), recently conducted two tests on a biologically-based lubricant (biolubricant) for chainsaw bars. The tests, which were run for Greenland Corporation of Calgary, will help industry establish product standards for biolubricants to encourage consumers to choose...

Genetic testing of embryos to pick 'savior sibling' OK with most Americans

Washington, D.C.-- A new survey by the Genetics and Public Policy Center at The Johns Hopkins University shows most Americans approve of using genetic testing and selection of embryos to make sure a baby will be a good match to donate blood or tissue to a sick brother or sister. But they disapprove of selecting an embryo based on whether the baby will be a girl or boy....... Preimplantation gene...

Derek R. Lovley receives 2004 Proctor & Gamble Award from American Society for Microbiology

WASHINGTON, DC--APRIL 23, 2004--Derek R. Lovley, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor and Department Head, Department of Microbiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has won the Proctor & Gamble Award in Applied and Environmental Microbiology from the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Supported by The Procter & Gamble Company, this prestigious award honors Lovley for an array o...

Govindarajan Dhanasekaran wins 2004 Sarber Award from American Society for Microbiology

WASHINGTON, DC--APRIL 23, 2004--Govindarajan Dhanasekaran, B.V.Sc., of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maryland, College Park, will receive the 2004 Raymond W. Sarber Award from the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Two Sarber Awards are presented each year to microbiology students at the undergraduate and predoctoral levels to recognize researc...
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(Date:8/28/2014)... Millennium Treatment Group is excited ... month will be a celebration of the positive ... Along with other treatment facilities and mental health ... the word about this national observance. , National ... of treatment and recovery professionals, and has since ...
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(Date:8/28/2014)... Arizona State University graduate student Anthony Gonzales, ... named one of five finalists in Entrepreneur magazine’s 2014 ... the fourth consecutive year that an ASU student has ... of SafeSIPP, and JJ Tang, co-founder of Vantage Realized, ... ASU dominated the competition: Three of the five finalists ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... FL (PRWEB) August 28, 2014 Millennium ... use affecting users in the workplace. A recent ... Dependence (NCADD) states that drug abuse is costing ... who use or are addicted to drugs affect their ... activities carry over into the workplace, causing expensive problems ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Raymond E. Blake Releases Blood's Thicker Than Water, Based on a True Story 2Health News:Millennium Treatment Group Celebrates National Recovery Month 2Health News:Millennium Treatment Group Works to Close Treatment Gap 2Health News:Arizona State University Grad Student in the Running for College Entrepreneur of the Year 2Health News:Arizona State University Grad Student in the Running for College Entrepreneur of the Year 3Health News:Drug Use Causes Problems in the Workplace 2
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