Tag: "rit" at biology news

Houston minority graduation rises in sciences, engineering as result of UH-led alliance

HOUSTON The University of Houston is paving the way for more minorities to earn degrees in science, technology, mathematics and engineering with notable success in a national NSF-sponsored program. ... ...In the last five years, the Houston-Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (H-LSAMP), led by UH and consisting of seven other academic institutions of higher education, is one of the...

4 October press briefing to focus on minority recruitment to science and engineering programs

More than one year after the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the value of diverse learning environments but struck down formulaic or points-based approaches to undergraduate admissions, a new report--scheduled for release 4 October--will clarify legally defensible options for protecting diversity in science and engineering programs....... The report, Standing Our Ground: A Guidebook for STEM Educator...

Gene clusters predict atherosclerosis severity, susceptibility

DURHAM, N.C. -- Duke University Medical Center researchers have identified specific clusters of genes within human aortas that appear to predict with great specificity which patients may be at highest risk for developing atherosclerosis, as well as the severity of the disease.... ...For the researchers, this is an important first of many steps toward developing highly individualized approaches to...

Genetic analysis rewrites salamander's evolutionary history

Berkeley - Biologists take for granted that the limbs and branches of the tree of life - painstakingly constructed since Linnaeus started classifying organisms 270 years ago - are basically correct. New genetic studies, the thinking goes, will only prune the twigs, perhaps shuffling around a few species here and there....... Hence the surprise when a new University of California, Berkeley, study...

Columbia research to examine gene influence on severity of peridontal disease, therapy response

NEW YORK, NY, September 9, 2004 Scientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) are looking into the genetic reasons why individuals experience periodontal disease so differently, and why some respond to treatment more successfully than others. Even with treatment, some patients continue to see deterioration of gum condition and eventual loss of teeth. ... ...The research is part of an...

The impact of genetic variations on the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis

Characterized by inflammation in the connective tissues of the joints, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be a painful, crippling autoimmune disease. Traditionally, patients have been treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or DMARDs, such as methotrexate (MTX). Several new therapies, however, focus on blocking tumor necrosis factor, or TNF, one of the body's chemical messengers with a ro...

K-State's National Agricultural Biosecurity Center receives $1.3 Million from Department of Defense

MANHATTAN, KAN. -- The Department of Defense has awarded a $1.38 million two-year contract to the National Agricultural Biosecurity Center at Kansas State University. ... ...Through efforts by the National Agricultural Biosecurity Center and its three subcontractors, the project will develop content and software to help the nation's emergency management personnel respond more effectively to an ag...

APS awards more than $140,000 to minority students of physiology

August 30, 2004 BETHESDA, Md. Since 1966, the American Physiological Society (APS) has awarded its Porter Physiology Fellowship to historically underrepresented minorities in science to encourage diversity among students pursuing full-time studies toward a Ph.D. in the discipline of physiology. This year, eight outstanding students have been awarded the one-year fellowship that provides each w...

Winner of 2004 EMBO Science Writing Prize announced

The EMBO Science Writing Prize is awarded annually for an outstanding piece of science writing that effectively communicates a topical issue to a non-scientific audience. Matthew Bottomley's innovative text fulfils this criterion on every level. The lively dialogue relates double agent James Pond's mission to combat the deadly 'Pseudo' bacteria currently a leading cause of hospital-acquired infe...

Advances in tumor angiogenesis Dendritic cells co-opted to the dark side

(Philadelphia, PA) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine discovered that in ovarian cancer immune cells can change into blood-vessel cells, and eventually promote the life-sustaining vasculature of the tumor. These findings were initially observed in a mouse model of ovarian cancer that the investigators generated and then confirmed in human ovarian cancer. This work m...

New genetic research demonstrates possible cause of inherited form of Parkinson's disease

Columbia University Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers have identified a possible cause of an inherited form of Parkinson's disease, which may be related to more common forms of the disease. The findings are reported in the August 27, 2004 issue of Science.... ...While the cause of most cases of Parkinson's disease is unknown, a few cases are inherited and can be...

Critically endangered monkey species plummets more than 50 percent since 1994

August 26, 2004 (Torino, Italy) The Delacour's langur (Trachypithecus delacouri), a charismatic monkey found only in a tiny area of northern Vietnam, is close to extinction, scientists at the International Primatological Society's 20th Congress reported today. New research suggests that as many as 200 of the remaining 300 individuals, one of the most threatened primates in the world, are likely...

Meteorites supplied Earth life with phosphorus

University of Arizona scientists have discovered that meteorites, particularly iron meteorites, may have been critical to the evolution of life on Earth. ......Their research shows that meteorites easily could have provided more phosphorus than naturally occurs on Earth -- enough phosphorus to give rise to biomolecules which eventually assembled into living, replicating organisms.......Phosphorus...

Homeland security initiative takes Memphis' ORNL technologies to the nation

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 23, 2004 The Department of Homeland Security's recent selection of Memphis as a "best practices" model for high-tech security measures could speed the implementation of similar technologies in other cities.... ...As the third of four sites to be named under DHS' Regional Technology Integration Initiative, Memphis becomes a source of practical security "know-how," provid...

Congress to fund Sequim-based coastal security research effort

SEQUIM, Wash.--A $4.2 million Congressional appropriation...will fund a new coastal security program designed to develop advanced sensors capable of providing early warning of biological, chemical or nuclear material releases in marine and coastal environments. The research program will be based at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Sequim Marine Research Operations facility in Sequim, Wash...

Improved nutrition could reduce malaria burden worldwide

A large percentage of child deaths related to malaria are attributable to undernutrition and deficiencies of vitamin A, zinc, iron and folate, according to a new report by researchers with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Their review of recent data from malaria endemic regions showed that improving child nutrition could prevent more malaria-related illnesses and deaths than p...

International symposium on nutritional genomics

Diet and genes, lifestyles and disease will be on the menu at the Bruce Ames International Symposium on Nutritional Genomics, to be held at the University of California, Davis, Oct. 22-24....... Topics at the meeting include how individuals respond differently to diets; how foods can influence health and aging; and ethical and consumer issues. The symposium will present the latest findings linkin...

British scientists exclude 'maverick' colleagues, says report

Scientists in Britain tend to exclude controversial 'maverick' colleagues from their community to ensure they do not gain scientific legitimacy, new research has shown....... A Cardiff University study has found that British scientists' attitudes differ considerably from those of their counterparts in Sweden, when managing dissent. ...... The research, by Lena Eriksson, a Swedish researcher in t...

Plant pathologists meeting in Anaheim, CA to discuss agricultural security, food safety, and more

St. Paul, MN (August 2, 2004) Plant pathologists (plant disease experts) from around the world are meeting in Anaheim, CA for the 2004 Annual Meeting of The American Phytopathological Society (APS) that runs through August 4. Over a five-day period, these plant scientists will present more than 30 different sessions on agricultural issues, new research discoveries, and more. Upcoming sessions of...

One-size-fits-all approach to nutrition recommendations may soon be outdated

Sacramento, CA January 19, 2004 A person's genetic predisposition to develop heart disease and history of hypertension are just as important as gender and age when it comes to determining dietary needs, according to an article in Nutrition Today. "Individualization of Nutrition Recommendations and Food Choices," written by Lori Hoolihan, PhD RD, discusses how a person's biological make-up coupl...

AgriTalk travels to the ASA-CSSA-SSSA meetings for the latest in agricultural research

MADISON, WI One of the nation's most popular radio programs, AgriTalk, will feature six leading scientists talking about cutting-edge agricultural research during a live broadcast at the Annual Meetings of the American Society of Agronomy (ASA)-Crop Science Society of America (CSSA)-Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) in Denver, CO, on Nov. 4. ... ..."This conference brings together leading r...

Familiarity decides if wolf spider loves 'em or eats 'em

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Sometimes familiarity does not breed contempt: A Cornell University behavioral scientist has found that female wolf spiders prefer mates that are comfortably familiar.... However, the researcher has discovered, a male wolf spider unlucky enough to attempt to mate with an unfamiliar female probably is doomed to be killed and eaten by the female. ... "Finding this behavior is real...

Premature birth linked to lack of nutrition before pregnancy: study

Even modest restrictions in maternal nutrition around the time of conception can lead to premature births and long-term adverse health effects for the offspring, says new research by a team of scientists from Canada, New Zealand and Australia.... ..."About 40 per cent of women who give birth prematurely are primarily what we call the idiopathic pre-term births where we don't understand why they w...

Research and development takes robots and automation into new territory

San Jose, Calif. April 23, 2003 Robotic automation has helped trim expenses and downtime by enabling corporations to manufacture more than one product on a production line. Cost savings can be achieved by fulfilling production needs inhouse.... ...Not only does robotic automation provide better quality products and greater output than manual processes, but it also diminishes the levels of scrap...

Timing of chemical signal critical for normal emotional development

A signaling protein suspected of malfunctioning in anxiety and mood disorders plays a key role in the development of emotional behavior, report researchers funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Mice lacking it in frontal brain circuits during an early critical period fail to develop normal reactions in anxiety-producing situations. ... Rene Hen, Ph.D., Columbia University, and col...

Plant pathologists look to forensics to aid in biosecurity

St. Paul, MN (July 7, 2004) - In an effort to protect the nation's crops from possible bioterrorism, plant pathologists are exploring how to apply techniques typically used in crime labs as a tool to fight bioterrorism. ......According to Jacqueline Fletcher, plant pathology professor, Oklahoma State University, the potential for microbes to be used with an intent to harm people, societies, or th...

UCSD team determines cellular stress within body is critical

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine have determined that a particular type of cellular stress called osmotic stress is of critical importance to cell growth and the body's immune response against infection. The findings may have implications for autoimmune disorders, transplant rejections, and potential cancer therapies....... (PNAS) the week of July...

Scientists discover genetic marker responsible for two-fold increase in risk of rheumatoid arthritis

MANHASSET, NY A team of researchers has discovered a genetic variation that doubles the risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The variation, referred to as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced "snip"), is present in about 28 percent of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 17 percent of the general population. This discovery resulted from a collaboration between scientists from th...

$5 million grant funds partnership, studies of minority-based issues in reproductive health

HERSHEY, PA- Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn., recently were awarded a $5 million collaborative research grant to establish research centers for the study of minority-based issues in reproductive health.... ...The goal of the Meharry-Penn State U54 Cooperative Reproductive Science Center is to establish a premier clinical research center...

Improved nutrition could prevent more than half of the world's child deaths annually

Undernutrition is the underlying cause of more than 53 percent of all child deaths that occur annually, including those from infectious diseases, pneumonia, diarrhea, measles and malaria, according to a new analysis by researchers with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the World Health Organization. ...... Childhood undernutrition, defined as underweight or low-weight-for-ag...

Trapping carbon in soil key for protecting global food security, dealing with climate change

COLUMBUS, Ohio Restoring soil carbon levels should be a top priority among the global community, according to a viewpoint article in this week's issue of the journal Science.... ...The amount of carbon that can be restored in the world's degraded agricultural soils will directly influence global food security and climate change within our lifetime, said Rattan Lal, author of the article and dire...

Lab mice rescued from Type 1 diabetes via dendritic cell-assisted therapy

Rockefeller University researchers have for the first time demonstrated a halting of early Type 1 diabetes in mice by restoring a critical class of T cells to their normal balance. ...... The findings, reported in the June 7 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine, prove an important biological principle that could lead to prevention of Type 1 diabetes in humans: autoimmunity can be reverse...

Carnegie Mellon U biologists identify critical player in yeast ribosome assembly

PITTSBURGH--Carnegie Mellon University biologists are the first to show that minor changes in the tail of one protein cripple yeast's ability to assemble protein-making machines called ribosomes. The findings, published in a recent issue of Molecular Cell, ultimately could help scientists develop better drugs to fight fungal infections. ......"Our findings are the first to link the structure of a...

Leroy Hood to receive 2004 Biotechnology Heritage Award

PHILADELPHIA, PA -- The Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) and the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) will present the 6th Annual Biotechnology Heritage Award to Leroy Hood, one of the world's leading scientists in molecular biotechnology and genomics and one of the first advocates of the Human Genome Project. The presentation will be made on Monday, 7 June, during the plenary breakfast se...

Plant pathologists to meet in Anaheim, CA to discuss agricultural security, food safety, and more

St. Paul, MN (May 19, 2004) On July 31 August 4, 2004, thousands of plant pathologists (plant disease experts) from across the world will gather at the Anaheim Convention Center for The American Phytopathological Society (APS) Annual Meeting. Over a five-day period, these plant scientists will present more than 30 different sessions on agricultural issues, new research discoveries, and more. Fo...

Plant disease under the homeland security microscope

AMARILLO -- Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, questions on plant diseases have added significance, said Dr. Charles Rush, plant pathologist with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Amarillo. Plant pests, including weeds, insects and diseases, cause extensive...yield losses to crops every year....... "Intentional or unintentional introduction of exotic pests or pathogens could directly i...

Ritalin may improve Parkinson's symptoms, OHSU study says

PORTLAND, Ore. A well-known drug used to treat hyperactive children boosts the potency of another drug that reduces Parkinson's disease symptoms, an Oregon Health & Science University study has found.... ...Scientists at the OHSU Parkinson Center of Oregon found that methylphenidate, known commercially as Ritalin, bolsters the effects of levodopa, a drug converted in the brain to dopamine. Methy...

White House lauds Physiological Society for mentoring underrepresented minorities in biomedicine

WASHINGTON (May 6, 2004) -- The White House and the National Science Foundation (NSF) today announced that the American Physiological Society (APS) is being awarded the 2003 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics, Science and Engineering Mentoring.... ...The award carries a $10,000 grant, which APS will use to help fund the Porter Physiology Fellowship Program designed to encourage unde...

Analysis uncovers critical stretches of human genome

Hundreds of stretches of DNA may be so critical to life's machinery that they have been "ultra-conserved" throughout hundreds of millions of years of evolution. Researchers have found precisely the same sequences in the genomes of humans, rats, and mice; sequences that are 95 to 99 percent identical to these can be found in the chicken and dog genomes, as well. ...Most of these ultra-conserved r...

Closing in on the cellular culprits of schizophrenia

(Philadelphia, PA) The cause of schizophrenia remains a mystery, despite the millions of dollars spent trying to discover which genes play a role in its etiology. In at least 10 populations around the world, a significant association between schizophrenia and the gene for dysbindin has been noted making dysbindin the most highly replicated schizophrenia-associated gene described to date. In at...
(Date:4/17/2014)... of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have ... than those with no inflammation, according to results of ... Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. , The link between persistent ... so-called high-grade prostate cancer those with a Gleason ... of the most aggressive and rapidly growing prostate cancers. ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... to a study published today in PLOS Pathogens ... where malaria is common can mount an immune response ... to avoid repeated bouts of high fever and illness ... their bloodstream. The findings may help researchers develop future ... the malaria parasite. , Each year, approximately 200 million ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... MANHASSET, NY In a review published in the ... MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, ... the medical community,s approach to treating sepsis, ... 200,000 Americans. , Sepsis occurs when molecules released into ... inflammation throughout the body. Inflammation is necessary for maintaining ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Doctors who treat patients with a severe and ... an agonizing treatment decision. , The drug sirolimus ... relieve shortness of breath. But some patients eventually ... potentially fatal complications following transplantation. , "It,s a ... director of Loyola University Medical Center,s LAM Clinic ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to ... UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the ... stroke-induced brain damage. , A complex and devastating neurological ... primary reason for disability in the U.S. The blood-brain ... blood-borne material into the brain, causing the permanent deficits ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 2Health News:Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer 3Health News:Study sheds light on how the immune system protects children from malaria 2Health News:Feinstein Institute researcher publishes new perspective on sepsis 2Health News:Patients with rare lung disease face agonizing treatment dilemma 2Health News:Patients with rare lung disease face agonizing treatment dilemma 3Health News:Study IDs new cause of brain bleeding immediately after stroke 2
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