Tag: "spect" at biology news

Viral suspect for amphibian decline traced to human spread through bait

What do Smallpox, AIDS, SARS, Monkeypox, West Nile Virus, Chestnut Blight, Dutch Elm Disease, Sudden Oak Death Syndrome, Sea Otter Mortality and Avian Flu have to do with the world-wide disappearance of frogs and salamanders, otherwise known as "Amphibian Decline"? And with bait shops?...... These diseases and their pathogens, with the unsuspecting support of humans and our global activities, all...

Livermore research in accelerator mass spectrometry highlighted at ACS meeting

LIVERMORE, Calif. -- DNA damage formed during carcinogenesis is just one of the topics researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will discuss during the 228th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia....... Paul Henderson of Livermore's Biology and Biotechnology Research Program (BBRP) will host a mini symposium titled "Emerging Applications of Accelerat...

Register early for the AIUM regional course, Ultrasound: The Complete Perspective, and save

The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) will host Ultrasound: The Complete Perspective, led by course director Peter Doubilet, MD, PhD, October 1617, 2004, at the Le Centre Sheraton, Montral, Canada. Take advantage of early registration (prior to August 13, 2004) and SAVE. ... ...The course will provide an update of current ultrasound and Doppler practices and techniques in abdom...

OHSU researchers discover molecular signaling system controlling aspects of embryonic development

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) have identified a secreted signaling protein that regulates smooth muscle development in fruit flies. In the absence of a protein called "Jelly Belly (Jeb)," primitive smooth muscle cells fail to migrate or differentiate, according to study results published in the October 2 issue of Nature. ...... "Our research shows that Jelly Belly is re...

SPECT imaging shows promise for accurate, early diagnosis of Alzheimer's

Reston, VA -- Alzheimer's disease (AD) currently afflicts approximately 4.5 million Americans. One of the most feared diseases of old age, AD robs its victims of their memories and personalities long before it takes their lives. Curing or slowing the progress of AD has been a high priority in the scientific community, but an early and accurate diagnosis is equally important given that several ot...

Functional food Safety aspects

This release is also available in .... ...Functional food, beyond providing a purely nutritional value, may promote health or reduce the risk of disease. An example is food meant to lower the cholesterol level. During the past few years, the potential benefits posed by functional foods have led to an increased interest by producers and consumers as well as a broader range of such products on the...

Rutgers researcher offers a new perspective on human evolution

NEW BRUNSWICK/PISCATAWAY, N.J. The fossil remains of early humans gave generations of scientists the clues needed to piece together much of our ancestral lineage. Chi-Hua Chiu now leads us into another dimension in the study of human origins: the underlying developmental and genetic processes that led to these remarkable evolutionary changes.... ..."To develop a better understanding of the gen...

New prospects for treating muscular dystrophy: Stem cells restore muscle in MD mice

This news release is also available in <A HREF="http://www.eurekalert.org/staticrel.php?view=MuscularDystrophyIT...">Italian ...... A study on mice suggests that a type of stem cells found in blood vessels may someday be able to regenerate wasting muscle in muscular dystrophy (MD) patients. ...... The authors caution that more research must be done before researchers consider applying these find...

Spectrum of West Nile symptoms includes paralysis

ST. PAUL, MN As the nation gears up for another season of West Nile virus, a new study extends the understanding of the clinical spectrum of West Nile symptoms, and points to extreme muscle weakness or paralysis as a significant cause of complications in affected patients. The study appears in the July 8 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.... ...Detai...

Collaboration at EMSL produces innovative mass spectrometer

The future of proteomics is in good hands with one of the most powerful and versatile mass spectrometers being developed by scientists and engineers from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.... ...The high-throughput Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer and automated liquid chromatography (LC) system is a breakthrough in mass spectrometr...

Gametes and embryos from mammalian stem cells: religious and ethics perspectives

A report to be published online by SciencExpress on 1 May 2003 (K. Hbner et al., "Derivation of Oocytes from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells,") raises important questions of definition, ethics, and policy regarding gametes and embryos. Three religious scholars explore the implications of this work if it extended to human embryonic stem cells. ... ... ... ..."Let's as...

Miniature spectrometer can detect biological hazards

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 17, 2003 Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a miniature device that can identify as little as a fraction of a spore of anthrax and other biological hazards within 30 milliseconds.... ...The Calorimetric Spectrometer (CalSpec TM) device technology can accurately identify biological hazards such as anthrax almost instantly...

Dartmouth researchers put recycling in perspective

HANOVER, N.H. Three Dartmouth researchers have found that resisting the temptation to buy an SUV can benefit the environment much more than recycling. They say that while recycling of some materials does contribute to overall environmental improvement, other personal decisions, such as what kind of car you drive, have a much greater environmental impact....... Andrew J. Friedland, professor and...

Prospect of greenhouse gas reduction drives biofuels market

... ... ......San Jose, Calif.--December 10, 2002-- The market for biofuels is driven by the need for security of fuel supply and the recognition that greenhouse gas emissions are causing global warming. In the US, the transportation sector is responsible for more than 70 percent of the petroleum consumed and one-third of the carbon dioxide emissions.... ... Statistics are similar in Europe wh...

Transgenic rice for human benefit: a religious perspective

A paper to be published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by A. K. Garg and R. J. Wu, "Trehalose accumulation in rice plants confers high tolerance levels to different abiotic stresses," shows the promise of biotechnology in the service of humanity, according to a religion scholar. ......Statement by Ronald Cole-Turner, Ph.D., Professor of Theology and Ethics, Pittsburgh Theologi...

Ovary gene may explain certain aspects of infertility

... "As humans we are incredibly bad at producing eggs with the normal number of chromosomes, which is the leading cause of pregnancy loss in women," says Benjamin Leader, an HMS MD/PhD candidate, a...

Mass spectrometer weighs in as proteomics breakthrough

RICHLAND, Wash. - A faster, more thorough mass spectrometry method for identifying proteins may significantly advance the technology infrastructure required to comprehend the role proteins play in cellular function and disease development. Already, the one-of-a-kind system, developed at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is beginning to provide new insights into ho...

Evolution of language: FOXP2 and human uniqueness in religious perspective

A paper to be published in Nature (W. Enard et al., "Molecular Evolution of FOXP2, a Gene Involved in Speech and Language") compares the human version of the FOXP2 gene with that of other mammals. Religious scholars comment on the implications for human uniqueness and similarity to other species. EMBARGOED UNTIL 14:00 EST 14 Aug 2002. All quotes are free to use by journalists in any news mediu...

A laser-based spectometry screening tool may provide early and efficient detection of breast cancer

Orlando, FL Breast cancer remains the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Researchers agree that pre-symptomatic screening to detect the early stages of cancer, before it has spread and is more difficult to treat, could lead to a significant drop in breast-cancer related mortality.... ...Unfortunately, only 50 percent of breast cancers are localized at the time of d...

ACS's JobSpectrum to help state labs fill public health jobs; fight terrorism

The American Chemical Society (ACS) and the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) announce a new partnership to help state public health laboratories prepare for biomonitoring to combat the growing threat of chemical terrorism. This partnership is supported with funds provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through a cooperative agreement with APHL. The initi...

DNA testing identifies suspect bacteria in coral reef disease

SALT LAKE CITY Using molecular microbiology techniques, scientists are a significant step closer to understanding and identifying the deadly microbes responsible for the mysterious black band disease that is destroying the worlds coral reef ecosystems....... One of the most destructive and widespread of the coral diseases, black band disease is characterized by a ring-shaped bacterial mat that r...

Two genetic suspects are identified in the mystery of why we need to sleep

SAN DIEGO -- Like sleuths in an endlessly complex Agatha Christie novel, scientists at The Neurosciences Institute have been trying to solve the mystery of why we need to sleep. Now, following a two-year investigation, they have identified two genetic suspects that suggest one day it may be possible to prevent the consequences of sleep deprivation.... ...The work presented in this weeks Nature, a...

Study boosts suspected link between mothers gum disease and both premature birth, low birth weight

CHAPEL HILL Mothers who suffer from gum disease are significantly more likely to deliver their babies prematurely than women without that illness, which also is known as periodontal disease, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study shows. Such women also are more likely than others to deliver babies whose weight is less than normal.... ... The study, done in collaboration with...

Gene therapy and sickle cell disease: Religious perspectives

Religious leaders, including prominent African American church leaders, comment on progress toward gene therapy for sickle cell disease, to be reported in "Correction of Sickle Cell Disease in Transgenic Mouse Models by Gene Therapy," by R. Pawliuk et al., in the 14 Decemeber 2001 issue of Science, which is EMBARGOED UNTIL 13-DECEMBER-2001 AT 14:00 ET US....... This release contains quotes from...

Gender issues related to spaceflight: A NASA perspective

November 25, 2001 -- Bethesda, Md. Twenty-two percent of the active astronaut corps are women (35 of 158). The average female astronaut is 42 years old (vs. 43 years for men) and weighs 60.7 kg (vs. 81.2 kg for men). Insufficient data exist in most of the discipline areas at the present time to draw valid conclusions about gender-specific differences in astronauts or to determine their impact on...

Canadian researchers find cancer suspect from grilled meat in human milk

A food chemical known to cause cancer in rats has been discovered in human breast milk, according to a group of Canadian researchers. The study represents the first time that the chemical, mostly associated with grilled meats, has been found in human breast milk, they say. ... ...Although no one is certain whether the chemical, called PhIP, actually causes cancer in humans, the researchers sugges...

Duke forum to address medical aspects of terrorism

DURHAM, N.C. -- A Nov. 26 forum hosted by Duke University Medical Center will examine what the medical community is doing to respond to and prepare for acts of terrorism.... The session, which is free and open to the public, is the eighth in a series of forums organized by Duke in the wake of the events of Sept. 11. The 90-minute forum begins at 7 p.m. in Von Canon rooms B and C in the B...

Unique UNC study confirms suspected worldwide epidemic of childhood obesity

(Embargoed) CHAPEL HILL Twenty-five of every 100 U.S. children are either overweight or obese, but children from other major nations are beginning to weigh too much as well, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study concludes. Sixteen percent of Russian youths are overweight or downright fat, and the figure for Chinese children is 7 percent.... ..."Child obesity is becoming a publi...

NASA unveils spectacular suite of new global data products

A new collection of Earth science data is now publicly available to advance global studies of how our planet's lands, oceans, atmosphere and life all interact to define our world's water cycle, carbon cycle and climate system. These data are courtesy of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Whereas good MODIS data have been available sin...

Baboons can think abstractly, in the first study to show that a non-human, non-ape animal shares a central aspect of human intelligence

.........WASHINGTON More non-human animals may be capable of abstract thought than previously known, with profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and the stuff that separates homo sapiens from other animals. A trans-Atlantic team of psychologists has found evidence of abstract thought in baboons, significant because baboons are "old world monkeys," part of a different pri...

GIS, bioinformatics collaborations offer promising new perspectives

BLACKSBURG, Va., June 28, 2001 The merits of linking two fields seemingly as disparate as geographic information systems (GIS) and bioinformatics might not seem obvious, but Virginia Techs recent symposium linking the twoand its roster of renowned participants from both fieldshas raised expectations "Applications of GIS to Bioinformatics" was the first major public forum to cross-pollinate the d...

Heritability of attitudes: Twin research in religious perspective

.The publication of "The Heritability of Attitudes: A Study of Twins" (JM Olson, PA Vernon, JA Harris, and KL Jang, in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology June 2001, embargoed until 17 June 2001 1800EDT), raises profound religious and philosophical questions about human freedom and moral responsibility. Commenting on this research are the Rev. Dr. Lindon Eaves, whose own twin research...

The world's most powerful NMR spectrometer

.The most powerful, high-resolution nuclear magnet resonance (NMR) spectrometer ever constructed was delivered today to The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). According to Peter Wright, Ph.D., Chairman, Department of Molecular Biology, the new NMR, referred to by the frequency at which it operates, 900 MHz, will become the centerpiece of one of the world's most prominent collections of NMR inst...

Krauss book explores universe from oxygen atom's perspective

. CLEVELAND -- Author and Case Western Reserve University physicist Lawrence Krauss begins his science epic "Atom: An Odyssey from the Big Bang to Life on Earth ... and Beyond" long before matter existed. His story is about the universe told from the perspective of a single oxygen atom. . A drink of water in the Rodin sculpture garden in Paris sets the stage for what becomes a toast to the begin...

Major unique new study shows infrequent inspections lead to greater stream pollution

. Chapel Hill -- Mayflies, dragonflies, stone flies and caddis flies can't take the witness stand in court, of course, but they can provide strong evidence of how well or badly construction workers follow sediment pollution prevention rules, a unique new environmental study shows. . The giant "disturbance" study, conducted by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists, revealed...

Cancer-linked BRCA2 gene plays previously unsuspected role in cell division

.Philadelphia -- The BRCA2 gene, linked to familial breast and ovarian cancers, plays an important and previously unsuspected role in human cell division, according to a new study by scientists at The Wistar Institute. When the BRCA2 protein is inactivated, their experiments showed, cells are dramatically delayed in their progress through mitosis, the cell-division stage of the cell cycle. The f...

Scientists suspect new genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's disease

... ... Three new, separate research studies suggest that a gene or genes on chromosome 10 may be risk factors for late onset Alzheimers disease (AD). The findings, reported in the December 22, 2000, issue of Science, are important new evidence that more than one gene may play a role in development of AD later in life. ... AD is a progressive, degenerative disorder, characterized by amyloid pl...

Just as you suspected: research shows a lot of things that taste bad are good for you

.Brussels sprouts, grapefruit, cabbage, kale, mustard greens, arugula, spinach, dark chocolates, red wine and a lot of other typical Thanksgiving leftovers are proven to contain dietary phytonutrients. These nutrients have been associated with cancer prevention and other health benefits. As a review by a University of Washington researcher showed, because these trace chemicals taste bitter, acri...

Cell studies may further gene therapy prospects for head and neck cancer

. CHAPEL HILL - New laboratory research at the University of North Carolina appears to kindle prospects of finding ways to treat head and neck cancer with gene therapy. . The study published November 20 in the journal Human Gene Therapy suggests that gene therapy techniques may be developed to preferentially target cancer cells or pre-cancerous cells that are at high risk for becoming maligna...

Suspect list shortens for maternal aggression's brain origins

. Scientists studying the origins of aggression have highlighted areas in the brains of mouse mothers that may generate fierce attacks on males who pose a potential threat to their pups.. . The findings will be presented by Johns Hopkins University postdoctoral researcher Stephen Gammie at this week's annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in New Orleans. Gammie says the results are an i...
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