Tag: "stanford" at biology news

Stanford scientist to discuss new approach to treating hepatitis C virus

STANFORD, Calif. - Last year Peter Sarnow, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, identified a previously unknown mechanism that the hepatitis C virus uses to replicate, yielding a promising new approach to combating the disease-causing virus. On April 5 at the Experimental Biology meeting in San Francisco, Sarnow will discuss recent developme...

Stanford researchers find stem cells in colorectal tumors

... ... "This work will enable us to better understand how to identify these cells, and...

Sleepless for science: Flies show link between sleep, immune system in Stanford study

... ... "When flies get sick, they stop sleeping," said David Schneider, PhD, assistant professor of microbiol...

5 Stanford professors elected to National Academy of Sciences

... ... Established by a congressional act in 1863, NAS is a private organization of scientists and engineers whose 2,025 active members are dedicated to furthering science and using it for the general welfare. Upon request, the academ...

Stanford scientists make major breakthrough in regenerative medicine

... "We hope the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon will ultimately lead to new insights regarding the potential of cells and tissues...

'Junk' DNA now looks like powerful regulator, Stanford researcher finds

... Gill Bejerano, PhD, assistant professor of developmental biology and of computer science at Stanford, found more than 10,000 nearly identical genetic snippets dotting the human chromosomes. Many of those snippets were located in gene-...

Pioneering approach to wastewater treatment earns Stanford engineer the 2007 Stockholm Water Prize

... The Stockholm Water Prize is presented annually by the Stockholm Water Institute for "outstanding water-related activities" in areas such a...

Stanford professor to discuss the ups and downs of 'team science'

... A veteran of collaborative research who has helped Stanford and other institutions implement interdisciplinary initiatives, Zare will give a talk titled ''Perspe...

Stanford-led study closes in on genes that may predispose some people to severe depression

STANFORD, Calif. ­ Some people appear to be ...genetically predisposed to developing severe ...depression, but researchers have yet to pin down ...the genes responsible. Now, a specific region ...rife with promise has been located on one ...chromosome by a consortium of researchers working ...under Douglas Levinson, MD, professor of ...psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the ...Stanford Univer...

Stanford discovery may help predict when toxoplasma can be deadly

STANFORD, Calif. - Toxoplasma is arguably the most successful animal ...parasite on earth: It infects hundreds of species of warm-blooded ...animals, most notably half of humanity. Its unusual ability to ...overcome the numerous challenges of infecting and reproducing inside ...such a wide range of creatures has long intrigued scientists, and now ...researchers at the Stanford University School...

InHealth awards two research grants to Stanford University

... The first s...

Mapping system tells skin cells whether to become scalp, palm tissues, Stanford study finds

... These cellular cornerstones direct embryonic patterning and wound healing by sending vital location cues to their neighbors, and may help in growing tissue for transplant or u...

Whether in mice or men, all cells age the same, Stanford study finds

... In a study to be published in the July 21 issue of Public Library of Science-Genetics, Kim and colleagues report finding a group of genes that are consistently less active in older animals across a varie...

New Down syndrome gene identified by Stanford/Packard scientists

... ... "We may now have the opportunity to make a big difference in...

Salk and Stanford teams join forces to reveal two paths of neurodegeneration

LA JOLLA, CA - Wiring the developing brain is like creating a topiary garden. Shrubs don't automatically assume the shape of ornamental elephants, and neither do immature nerve cells immediately recognize the "right" target cell. Abundant foliage, either vegetal or neuronal, must first sprout and then be sculpted into an ordered structure....... Neurons extend fibers called axons to target cells...

For Stanford scientists, RNAi gene therapy takes two steps forward, one step back

STANFORD, Calif. - Three years ago Mark Kay, MD, PhD, published the first results showing that a hot new biological phenomenon called RNA interference was an effective gene-therapy technique in mice. That finding kicked off an RNAi gene therapy research flurry amongst both academic and industry research groups.... ......Now, with three human RNAi gene therapy trials under way, Kay's initial excit...

Eight Stanford scholars elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), one of the country's oldest honorary learned societies, announced on April 24 the election of 175 new fellows and 20 new foreign honorary members, including eight Stanford University scholars--Lawrence Bobo, Savas Dimopoulos, Margaret Fuller, Larry Kramer, Lawrence Lessig, Susan McConnell, Franco Moretti and Stephen Shenker....... Founded in 1780...

Learning to love bacteria: Stanford scientist highlights bugs' benefits

Bacteria are bad. Mothers and doctors, not to mention the cleaning product industry, repeatedly warn of their dangers. But a Stanford University School of Medicine microbiologist is raising the intriguing idea that persistent bacterial and viral infections have benefits....... Stanley Falkow, PhD, the Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor in Cancer Research, is publishing his thoughts on this...

Stanford/Packard scientist's data-mining technique strikes genetic gold

A new method to mine existing scientific data may provide a wealth of information about the interactions among genes, the environment and biological processes, say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Like panning for gold, they used the powerful technique to sift through millions of bits of unrelated information...

Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy fixes frail muscle cells in animal model, Stanford study finds

A new gene therapy technique that has shown promise in skin disease and hemophilia might one day be useful for treating muscular dystrophy, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine....... In the study, scheduled to be published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of Jan. 2, the researchers used gene therapy to introduce a...

Stanford evolution research cited by Science as a 2005 breakthrough

When the editors at Science looked back over the research reported in 2005, they decided that several high-impact discoveries made evolution stand out as the Breakthrough of the Year. Among the research highlighted is work by David Kingsley, PhD, professor of developmental biology at Stanford University School of Medicine, who studies the evolutionary process in a diverse group of fish called the...

Stanford scientists' discovery of hormone offers hope for obesity drug

STANFORD, Calif. - When the appetite-enhancing hormone ghrelin was discovered a few years ago, researchers thought they had found the last of the major genes that regulate weight. ......They were wrong. ......Introducing: obestatin, a newly discovered hormone that suppresses appetite. ......The finding, to be published in the Nov. 11 issue of Science, offers a key to researchers developing treatm...

Leukemia, infection tied to aging stem cells, Stanford researchers say

STANFORD, Calif. - Older people are more prone to infections and have a higher risk of developing leukemia, and now researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have one hint as to why that may be. The group found that in mice, the bone marrow stem cells responsible for churning out new blood cells slow down in their ability to produce immune cells, leaving older mice with fewer defenses...

Stem cell training program to make its Stanford debut

STANFORD, Calif. - For the first time ever, an advanced training program that teaches how to create and maintain embryonic stem cell lines will be offered outside of the University of Pittsburgh, where it originated in 2003. The weeklong course on these all-purpose cells, which can develop into any of the tissue in the adult body, will run June 15-23 at the James H. Clark Center at the Stanford U...

Stem cells from brain transformed to produce insulin at Stanford

STANFORD, Calif. - With careful coaxing, stem cells from the brain can form insulin-producing cells that mimic those missing in people with diabetes, according to a paper published in the April 26 issue of PLoS Medicine....... ...Although the work is not yet ready for human patients, Seung Kim, MD, PhD, the lead author and assistant professor of developmental biology at the Stanford University Sc...

Aldo Leopold leadership program moves to Stanford University and awards new fellowships for 2005

The Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, which trains academic environmental scientists to communicate effectively to non-scientists, has relocated to Stanford University. The program had been based at the New England Aquarium in Boston before joining the Stanford Institute for the Environment earlier this year....... Debbie Drake Dunne, former director of government relations for the Nature Conserva...

Same mutation aided evolution in many fish species, Stanford study finds

STANFORD, Calif. - After decades of laboratory work studying how animals evolve, researchers sometimes need to put on the hip waders, pull out the fishing net and go learn how their theory compares to the real world. According to a Stanford University School of Medicine study published in the March 25 issue of , Mother Nature is more predictable than lab experiments suggest....... In a diverse g...

First real-time view of developing neurons reveals surprises, say Stanford researchers

STANFORD, Calif. - Scientists have believed that neurons need a long period of fine-tuning and training with other neurons before they take on their adult role. But after using new technology for the first time to watch these cells develop, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that neurons come into this world with a good idea about what they'll become as adul...

Stanford researcher to discuss public confidence in genetic technology

STANFORD, Calif. - If you buy the hype, genetics will soon transform medicine from a hit-and-miss ordeal to a realm where patients get exactly the treatment that's appropriate for their own genetic background. But these breakthroughs have been slow to arrive and fraught with ethical dilemmas....... ...How genetics can be safely translated into reliable and affordable medical applications will be...

Racial groupings match genetic profiles, Stanford study finds

STANFORD, Calif. - Checking a box next to a racial/ethnic category gives several pieces of information about people - the continent where their ancestors were born, the possible color of their skin and perhaps something about their risk of different diseases. But a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine finds that the checked box also says something about a person'...

Hypertension risk in African-Americans linked to genetics, Stanford study finds

STANFORD, Calif. - National health records have shown that African-Americans are more prone to high blood pressure than Caucasians, but pinning down the roots of that difference has proven elusive. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have narrowed down the search for genes that contribute to this difference in disease risk....... Finding such a gene could have several b...

Stanford biologist working to restore native forests to Hawaii

There's trouble in paradise. In Hawaii, where cattle have dotted the landscape for decades, ranching is becoming less profitable. Some landowners are cashing in on the vacation resort market by developing their land with high-rise hotels, cottages and "ranchettes."...... But a group from Stanford University's Center for Conservation Biology (CCB) is working to make restoration of native forests j...

Stanford study links obesity to hormonal changes from lack of sleep

... ...STANFORD, Calif. - The less you sleep, the more you may gain. So say Stanford University School of Medicine researchers, who found in a recent study that sleep loss leads to higher levels of a hormone that triggers appetite, lower levels of a hormone that tells your body it's full and an increased body mass index.... ...The findings not only add to the growing body of evidence showing tha...

Genome of ancient fish could reveal evolutionary mysteries, Stanford scientists say

STANFORD, Calif. A prehistoric fish that until 1938 was thought to be extinct has caught the eye of geneticists at the Stanford University School of Medicine who hope to sequence the ancient genome to learn how animals evolved to live on land.... ...The 5-foot, 130-pound fish in question, called the coelacanth, ekes out an existence in cool, deep-water caves off the Comoro Islands in the Indian...

Joslin and Stanford researchers find key clues to muscle regeneration

BOSTON -- Scientists at Stanford University and Joslin Diabetes Center are providing new insights into how muscle cells regenerate -- leading to powerful tools to help scientists better understand diseases such as muscular dystrophy. ...Skeletal muscle contains a complex array of cell types. Among its principal components are multi-nucleated muscle fibers and muscle satellite cells -- cells loc...

Stanford environmental molecular science institute will study pollutants, one molecule at a time

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has established a new research institute at Stanford University dedicated to tackling environmental pollution problems at the molecular level. A major focus of the Stanford Environmental Molecular Science Institute will be on how heavy metal contamination in water, soils and sediments interacts with the surfaces of environmental solids and bacteria....... ''...

Genetic data crunching achieves milestone at Stanford

STANFORD, Calif. - The revolution was not televised....... In the fall of 1999, the Stanford Microarray Database booted up, and a level of computing power was suddenly available to the field of molecular biology that only a few years earlier was inconceivable. On Oct. 19, the database recorded its 50,000th experiment, marking its place at the forefront of an information processing revolution that...

Stanford cooling tool may improve performance of athletes, soldiers

When people exercise, their muscles consume energy and generate heat as a byproduct. When enough heat accumulates internally, it can limit exercise performance. Two Stanford biologists have developed a method for cooling that maximizes heat transfer through the palms of the hands. The idea is to engorge confluences of arteries and veins located there by mechanically drawing blood into them. The t...

Stanford researchers establish center for physics-based simulations of biological structures

The National Institutes of Health have awarded $19.9 million over five years to Russ Altman, associate professor of genetics, and Scott Delp, associate professor and chair of bioengineering, to establish and lead the National Center for Physics-Based Simulation of Biological Structures (SimBioS). The new center is charged with developing a simulation toolkit to enable scientists worldwide to mode...

New Stanford center probes nanoscale material

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $7.5 million over five years to establish the Center for Probing the Nanoscale (CPN) at Stanford. Kathryn Moler, associate professor of applied physics and of physics, and David Goldhaber-Gordon, assistant professor of physics, will be co-directors. The CPN is one of six new centers that the NSF is funding to support science and engineering at the...
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