Tag: "dunk" at biology news

Identifying blood stem cells is a SLAM dunk

Researchers have developed a simple technique to identify hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells based on a set of characteristic markers that the cells display on their surface. The elucidation of this distinctive stem-cell code is the first time that researchers have been able to identify specific stem cells by looking at surface markers drawn from a single family of genes. ...Stem cells a...
(Date:7/24/2014)... decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year ... study on the impact of humans on declining animal ... invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, slugs and worms ... control for crops, decomposition for nutrient cycling, water filtration ... Science and led by UCL, Stanford and UCSB, ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... sticky research out of York University shows a surprisingly ... toxic grass fungus: moose saliva (yes moose saliva). ... "Ungulate saliva inhibits a grassendophyte mutualism" shows that moose ... (which hosts a fungus called epichlo festucae that produces ... less toxicity. , "Plants have evolved defense mechanisms to ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... counterparts in humans, affect the connections between nerve cells ... hippocampus, an area of the brain that plays a ... memories. The results of the study have been published ... depends on the active communication between nerve cells, known ... into a dense network where they constantly relay signals ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 3Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research 2A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center 2A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center 3A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center 4
Other Tags
edwardgeologicaloccurautoantibodieshallmarksabotagemalfunctioningbondingtoolboxinadequatelycombivirziagenflavanolssudsflavivirusesmassachusetts