Tag: "lip" at biology news

Story ideas from the Journal of Lipid Research

... ... ... New insight into how low HDL causes heart disease... Too much of a key protein observed in type 2 diabetes patients... Thematic Review: How fat tissue works... ... ......... ... Researchers have found that one of the reasons people with low HDL a molecule that helps eliminate excess cholesterol from arteries are at ris...

New designer lipid-like peptide with lipid nanostructures for drug delivery systems

Scientists from Institute of Biophysics and Nanosystems Research (IBN), Austrian Academy of Sciences and of Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA report the study of Tuning Curvature and Stability of Monoolein Bilayers by Designer Lipid-Like Peptide Surfactants in the May 30th issue of the online, open-access journal PLoS ONE. Their findings no...

Lipoic acid explored as anti-aging compound

... ... "The evidence suggests that lipoic acid is actually a low-level stressor th...

Phillip A. Sharp to receive the 2007 Winthrop-Sears Award

... "As a researcher, Phil Sharp's work opened an entirely new area in molecular biology and forever changed the field," said Joel W. Jones, president of The Chemists'...

Story ideas from the Journal of Lipid Research

... ... Fish, Seafood Better than Olive Oil, Nuts against Heart Disease... Heart Disease Linked to Too Much Cholesterol in Cell Organelle... New Link Between Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease... Thematic Review: How Lipids Anchor Proteins on a Cell Membrane... ... ... ... ... Researchers have found that a diet rich...

pHLIP, a novel technology to locate and treat tumors

... The researchers show that, the protein fragment, called pHLIP (pH (Low) Insertion Peptide) can be injected into the abdomen of a mouse, find its way into the blood and then specifically accumulate in tumors. Within 20 hours after injection of labeled pHL...

Link found between immune system and high plasma lipid levels

... In the April 13, 2007, issue of Science, the research teamled by James C. Lo, an MD, PhD student, in the laboratory of Yang-Xin Fu, MD, PhD, professor of pathology at the University of Chicagosuggest that an engineered protein could keep mice, and possibly humans, from developing high cholesterol...

ConocoPhillips establishes $22.5M biofuels research program at Iowa State

... ... Biorenewable fuels are produced from organic materials and help...

New genetic mutations found that may cause cleft lip/palate

... ... Cleft lip and palate, found in nearly one of every 700 live births worldwide, occurs when tissues that normally form the lip and palate fail to join early in fetal life. The investigation focused on...

Sphingolipids with therapeutic ends

... Sphingolipids are a class of fats fundamental to the architecture of the cell and for regulating metabolism. They are impor...

Discovery of new cave millipedes casts light on Arizona cave ecology

... ... Wynne and Voyles, known fo...

The Biology and Fisheries of the Slipper Lobster

Written by international experts, The Biology and Fisheries of the Slipper Lobster provides comprehensive coverage of the known biology, ecology, behavior, physiology, evolutionary history, and genetics of the numerous species in the family history, and genetics of the numerous species in the family Scyllartida. It covers fishing methods and regulations, size and composition of catches, fisheri...

2006 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize awarded

... While serving as president of MIT from 1990 to 2004, Vest worked to strengthen federal-university-industry relations and helped bring education and research issues to broader public attention. He put special emphasis on undergraduate education in science and engineering and also stressed the importance of racial and cultural diversity amon...

The Biology and Fisheries of the Slipper Lobster

Written by international experts, The Biology and Fisheries of the Slipper Lobster provides comprehensive coverage of the known biology, ecology, behavior, physiology, evolutionary history, and genetics of the numerous species in the family history, and genetics of the numerous species in the family Scyllartida. It covers fishing methods and regulations, size and composition of catches, fisheri...

Lipid plays big role in embryonic development

... ... Probably 90 percent of ceramide gathers at the top or apical end of these early stem cells, literally helping cells have direction. "We have cell polarity, an up and down, a head and foot of the cell, and that is what...

The new form of trypanosomiasis discovered in India stems from a deficiency in apolipoproteinL-1

The two known types of human trypanosomiasis, endemic in two regions of the world, are sleeping sickness in Africa, caused by the parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodiense, and Chagas' disease in South America induced by T. cruzi. Everywhere else, normally only animals are infected by trypanosomes that, although specific for humans are not pathogenic for them. Yet, in 2004, the f...

New group of algae discovered: Picobiliphytes

... Approx...

Philippines president enacts new national conservation policy

... ... The order applies to all of the natural...

New dwarf buffalo discovered by chance in the Philippines

CHICAGO--Almost 50 years ago, Michael Armas, a mining engineer from the central Philippines, discovered some fossils in a tunnel he was excavating while exploring for phosphate. Forty years later, Dr. Hamilcar Intengan, a friend of his who now lives in Chicago, recognized the importance of the bones and donated them to The Field Museum. ... If not for the attention and foresight of these two ind...

Gene offers new lead in cleft lip and palate research

... With several genes already implicated in causing cleft lip and palate, the authors note their addition to the list comes with a unique biological twist. The SUMO1 gene encodes a small protein that is attached to the protein products of at least three previously discovered "clefting" genes during facial development, in essence linking...

Flipping the angiogenic switch

... ... Using a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, Dr. Gerard Evan (UCSF) and colleagues determined how the Myc o...

Beyond lipids: understanding the mechanics of atherosclerosis

... The findings, which are currently available online at the journal's Website, were reported...

Eavesdropping fringe-lipped bats spread culture through sound

AUSTIN, Texas--Like a diner ordering a dessert based solely on the "oohs" and "aahs" of a customer eating the same dish the next table over, frog-eating bats learn to eat new prey by eavesdropping on their neighbors as they eat, report biologists from The University of Texas at Austin....... Rachel Page and Mike Ryan, studying fringe-lipped bats at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute on B...

Gladstone scientists prove neurons produce Alzheimer's-linked apolipoprotein E

A question long debated among Alzheimer's disease researchers has been definitively answered by scientists at the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease in San Francisco. ...... Using a unique mouse model, Gladstone Investigator Yadong Huang, MD, PhD, and his team have proven that, under certain conditions, neurons produce Alzheimer's-linked apolipoprotein E.... ... Also known as apoE, this...

Interfering RNA silences genes in 'slippery' immune cells

A technical advance in laboratory techniques may provide biology researchers broader access to RNA interference, a process of blocking the activity of targeted genes. RNA interference has recently emerged as an important tool in studying how genes function in normal biological processes and in disease....... Writing in the Journal of Immunological Methods, published online on March 24, a research...

Targeted drug delivery now possible with 'pHLIP' peptide

New Haven, Conn. -- Scientists at Yale and the University of Rhode Island report the development of a peptide that can specifically and directly deliver molecules to the inside of cells like a nanosyringe, creating a new tool for drug delivery, gene control and imaging of diseased tissues.......... Their "cargo carrier" peptide called pHLIP, for pH (Low) Insertion Peptide, accumulates in the memb...

Starving diamond-back still grows; rattler cuts metabolism 80 percent, use lipid energy source

SAN FRANCISCO Nearly every organism has developed its own mechanism to cope with starvation or reduce food availability, whether for hours or months....... In the arctic winter, penguins and polar bears store up huge amounts of fat but stay active. Hibernators such as squirrels and groundhogs fatten up for the winter then lower their metabolism by sleeping off. ...... But desert snakes don't di...

New lipid molecule holds promise for gene therapy

Scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara have created a new molecule that holds promise in fighting disease via gene therapy. Inherited diseases, as well as many cancers and cardiovascular diseases, may eventually be helped by this approach, which delivers therapeutic genes directly to cells. These genes can correct genetic defects, for example, or help the body's immune system f...

EPSRC and Philips announce new strategic alliance

EPSRC and Philips Research announce a strategic alliance to develop next generation biomedical diagnostic technologies ...... EPSRC and Philips Research have announced a 6m agreement to fund research and training in biomedical technology. The research is aimed at the development of next generation diagnostic and monitoring technologies for medical devices. Prime application examples are likely to...

Prestigious 2005 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize honors Norman R. Augustine

For his outstanding contributions to U.S. science and technology policy, his unrelenting work to maintain U.S. scientific and technological preeminence, and his initiatives to strengthen the scientific partnerships between academia, industry, and government, AAAS today named Norman R. Augustine, former chief executive officer (CEO) of Lockheed Martin Corp., to receive the prestigious 2005 AAAS Ph...

Hot-spring bacteria flip a metabolic switch

Scientists at the Carnegie Institution's Department of Plant Biology have found that photosynthetic bacteria living in scalding Yellowstone hot springs have two radically different metabolic identities. As the sun goes down, these cells quit their day job of photosynthesis and unexpectedly begin to fix nitrogen, converting nitrogen gas (N2) into compounds that are useful for cell growth. The stud...

UT Southwestern physician-researcher wins international award for lipid research

DALLAS Dr. Helen Hobbs, director of the Eugene McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development and an investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been awarded Germany's highly respected Heinrich Wieland Prize for her research on lipids....... The prestigious international science award is given annually to an individual who has conducted outstandin...

Lippman recognized for discoveries in cancer prevention

PHILADELPHIA Scott M. Lippman, M.D., chairman of the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention and Ellen F. Knisely Distinguished Chair at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, has been selected to receive the fourth annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)-Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation (CRPF) Award for Excellence in Cancer Prevention Research....

Flipped genetic sequences illuminate human evolution and disease

......Although humans and chimpanzees diverged from one another genetically about six million...

Flip-flopped chromosome reveals a first clue to Tourette syndrome

Researchers have identified the first gene mutation associated with Tourette syndrome opening a new avenue for understanding the complex disorder that causes muscle and vocal tics. ...Until now, causes of Tourette syndrome (TS), which afflicts as many as 1 in 100 people, have eluded researchers because the disease appears to be caused by subtle mutations in many genes. ...The researchers publish...

Sitagliptin, a new investigational treatment for type 2 diabetes, may offer new hope for patients

There are currently more than 194 million people with diabetes worldwide and this figure could exceed 333 million by 2025 if untreated. [2] Current treatments for type 2 diabetes are often limited by their side effect profile, route of administration or difficulties in sustaining glucose control. [3] As a result, there is a need for better tolerated treatments that do not cause weight gain and p...

Flipped, expelled, copied, and shrunk

The September 2005 issue of .... ...... ......Scientists generally believe that insertions of retroelements, or "jumping genes," once established in a population, are irreversible and are maintained throughout evolution. This unidirectional theory of retroelement evolut...

Slipping past the blood brain barrier: Research shows potential treatment for brain cancer

ST. LOUIS -- A compound that kills cancer can sneak past the blood brain barrier, which protects the brain from foreign substances, to do its work in fighting a particularly invasive brain cancer, according to a new Saint Louis University animal study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition the week of Aug. 22....... "The bottom line is, if you can ge...

Beyond genes: Lipid helps cell wall protein fold into proper shape

HOUSTON (July 15, 2005) A protein that provides a vital passage through a bacterium's outer cell wall will misfold and malfunction if that wall is built of the 'wrong' material, scientists at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston report in a finding that has long-term implications for understanding diseases caused by misfolded proteins such as cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer's disease, a...

New insight into autoimmune disease: Bacterial infections promote recognition of self-glycolipids

The immune system is a complex and powerful weapon that provides protection against bacteria and viruses that, if left unchecked, would wreak havoc throughout the human body. The ability of the immune system to recognize the body's own tissues is essential, but sometimes the immune system loses the ability to distinguish "self" from potentially harmful invaders. This can lead to autoimmune dise...
(Date:11/4/2014)... Temple University School of Medicine announced today that ... initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates ... Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences; and Vice Chair ... School of Medicine will pursue an innovative global ... Biomarkers to Assess Fetal Neurodevelopment.", Grand Challenges Explorations ...
(Date:11/4/2014)... – (Nov. 4, 2014) – A majority of Madagascar,s ... that could have serious consequences for the rainforests they ... shows the positive impacts lemurs can have on rainforest ... their disappearance could have on the region,s rich biodiversity. ... have fruits eaten by lemurs. Lemurs in turn ...
(Date:11/3/2014)...  NeuroSigma ® , Inc. (NeuroSigma), a ... on commercialization of its non-invasive Monarch ... neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, announced today that the ... Notice of Allowance for Mexican Patent Application No. ... and the Regents of the University of California ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Temple University School of Medicine receives Grand Challenges Explorations grant 2Gardeners of Madagascar rainforest at risk 2Gardeners of Madagascar rainforest at risk 3NeuroSigma Receives Notice of Allowance from the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property Covering Subcutaneous Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (sTNS) 2NeuroSigma Receives Notice of Allowance from the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property Covering Subcutaneous Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (sTNS) 3
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