Tag: "ucsb" at biology news

UCSB researchers show how to make polymeric micro- and nanoparticles

... Polymeric micro-...

UCSB Assistant Professor Patrick Daugherty wins Young Investigator Award from ACS

... The Society recognizes Daugherty for his outstanding contributions to the field of protein engineering, including the development of novel peptide display methodologie...

UCSB marine biologist to present talk at opening ceremony for the International Polar Year

... The event will be held at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) auditorium, 2100 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. It is sponsored by...

UCSB study on sibling detection mechanism highlighted in Nature

... A team of researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has found evidence of a nonco...

NIH funds innovative alzheimer's research initiated at UCSB

A completely new approach to the study of Alzheimers disease, initiated by a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, may solve a critical piece in the puzzle of the disease. This tragic neurological illness progressively erases memory in its millions of victims. The key to the new approach is understanding the way certain proteins in the brain fold, or rather misfold. ... Mich...

Scientific American names UCSB professor, alumna to list of Top 50 in Technological Leadership

... Daniel E. Morse is a professor of molecular genetics and biochemistry and director of the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (ICB) at UCSB. His former graduate...

UCSB's Patrick Daugherty wins a 2006 Camille Dreyfus

Santa Barbara, Calif. Patrick Daugherty, assistant professor of chemical engineering at UC Santa Barbara, has won a prestigious Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, designed to help support the teaching and research careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences. The award includes a $75,000 unrestricted research stipend....... The award this year went to 15 individuals, only three...

UCSB researchers discover new biotechnology to identify and engineer substrates for proteases

Santa Barbara, California May 1 , 2006 Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have developed a new biotechnology that enables scientists to identify and engineer protease substrates, giving them the means of crafting pharmaceuticals to outsmart disease. Their work, authored by Patrick Daugherty, an assistant professor of Chemical Engineering, and Kevin Boulware, a PhD candidate, are published online...

UCSB Neuroscience Research Institute: $1.25-million grant by Keck Foundation for Biomedical Research

The W. M. Keck Foundation's Medical Research Program has awarded UC Santa Barbara $1.25-million to support a pioneering multidisciplinary research initiative focusing on tiny RNA molecules-microRNAs-and their impact on the regulation of gene function....... "The scientific knowledge that is likely to emerge from the proposed work will be fundamental for a comprehensive and deep understanding of t...

UCSB researchers discover shape matters to macrophages

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have made a surprising discovery: phagocytosis depends more on particle shape than size. The research, which has far-reaching implications for immunology, vaccine development and drug delivery, is published today online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Samir Mitragotri, a UCSB professor of chemical engineering, and graduate student Julie A....

ICON funds UCSB survey of nanotechnology best practices

The International Council on Nanotechnology (ICON) has awarded $55,000 to researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) to conduct a "Review of Best Practices for Nanotechnology Safety."...... ICON, a coalition of academic, industrial, governmental and civil society organizations, is administered by Rice University's Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN...

UCSB researchers discover that the cell's endosomes use a surprising transportation system

Santa Barbara, California October 5, 2005 -- Cells have developed a surprising transportation system for their endosomes, according to research published today in Physical Review Letters, "Dynamics and Spatial Organization of Endosomes in Mammalian Cells."... ...By marking endosomes with fluorescent tags and watching them move in live cells, Samir Mitragotri, a UCSB professor of chemical enginee...

UCSB chosen for two NIH Program of Excellence (PEN) in nanotechnology grants

July 14, 2005 Santa Barbara, CA The University of California, Santa Barbara, has been chosen to participate in two interdisciplinary, multi-university research efforts as a Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology (PEN). The awards by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are part of NIH's strategy to accelerate progress in medical research throu...

UCSB among team awarded $12.5 million to develop nanoscale systems for early diagnosis

July 14, 2005 Santa Barbara, Calif. A partnership of scientists from the College of Engineering at UC Santa Barbara, Washington University in St. Louis and UC Berkeley have been awarded $12.5 million to develop nanoscale agents to provide early diagnosis and treatment of acute pulmonary and systemic vascular injury over the next five years. The organizations were selected as a collaborative "Pr...

Discovery at UCSB may lead to new drugs to treat cancer, control fertility

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) A recent discovery in cellular biology may allow scientists to enhance organ regeneration by stem cells, prevent the progression of cancer, and control fertility. ... The discovery was made in the laboratory of Joel H. Rothman, professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. It was described in a paper published...

UCSB makes important advances in studies of retinal detachment

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) Scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Neuroscience Research Institute are reporting significant advances in their studies of retinal detachment: ... They have discovered that cellular changes that occur in the retinas of animals with retinal detachments also occur in humans. This implies that experimental therapies that reduce cellular damage in...

UCSB researchers advance understanding of urinary tract infections

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) Anyone who has ever had a urinary tract infection knows that they can be difficult to fight. ......The bacterium E. coli is responsible for about 80 percent of human urinary tract infections. Scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara have made important strides in understanding E. coli at the molecular level in an effort to discover the mechanisms by which...
(Date:10/17/2014)... release is available in German . ... a very few drugs. When treating overdoses, doctors are often ... especially difficult if there is a combination of drugs involved. ... and accidentally swallows his grandmother,s pills? ETH professor Jean-Christophe Leroux ... to find an answer to this question. "The task was ...
(Date:10/16/2014)... thinking on how the bowel lining develops and, in ... cancer starts. , The researchers produced evidence that stem ... that are a feature of the bowel lining, and ... development, a controversial finding as scientists are still divided ... technologies, Dr Chin Wee Tan and Professor Tony Burgess ...
(Date:10/16/2014)... SHELTON, Conn. , October 16, 2014 ... ("NXT-ID" or the "Company"), a biometric authentication company focused ... present its leading edge technologies including Wocket™, the Smart ... Review® (FiRe) Conferenece. FiRe is a leading global conference ... Hosted by Mark Anderson , founder ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Emergency aid for overdoses 2Emergency aid for overdoses 3Cryptic clues drive new theory of bowel cancer development 2NXT-ID Inc. to Present at 13th Annual FiRe Conference 2NXT-ID Inc. to Present at 13th Annual FiRe Conference 3
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