Tag: "osteoporisis" at medical news

Osteoporisis treatment update

Osteoporosis, the "silent killer" will affect one in three women over 50 and one in five men over 50. And as the elderly population grows worldwide, by 2050 the number of women and men that will suffer from osteoporosis-related hip fractures is set to increase by 240% and 310% respectively. But with increased awareness and a growing arsenal of therapeutic interventions and osteoporosis medicines...
(Date:7/24/2014)... decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year ... study on the impact of humans on declining animal ... invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, slugs and worms ... control for crops, decomposition for nutrient cycling, water filtration ... Science and led by UCL, Stanford and UCSB, ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... sticky research out of York University shows a surprisingly ... toxic grass fungus: moose saliva (yes moose saliva). ... "Ungulate saliva inhibits a grassendophyte mutualism" shows that moose ... (which hosts a fungus called epichlo festucae that produces ... less toxicity. , "Plants have evolved defense mechanisms to ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... counterparts in humans, affect the connections between nerve cells ... hippocampus, an area of the brain that plays a ... memories. The results of the study have been published ... depends on the active communication between nerve cells, known ... into a dense network where they constantly relay signals ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 3Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research 2A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center 2A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center 3A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center 4
Other Tags
edwardgeologicaloccurautoantibodieshallmarksabotagemalfunctioningbondingtoolboxinadequatelycombivirziagenflavanolssudsflavivirusesmassachusetts