Tag: "ume" at medical news

HealthGrades study: Bariatric surgery patients have fewer complications at high-volume hospitals

... A c...

Patients with soft tissue sarcomas should be treated at high volume centers

... ... Using an analysis of a la...

'Supersize me' mice research offers grim warning for America's fast food consumers

... Brent Tetri, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine at Saint Louis University Liver Center, and colleagues studied the effects of a diet that was 40 percent fat and replete with high fructose corn syrup, a sweet...

Consumer nail gun injuries spike

... ... Nail gun...

Apple consumers reap heart-health benefits thanks to flavonoid content, says new research

... Women of all ages are encouraged to consume more fruit and vegetables, including apples and apple p...

NOVA to air two-hour documentary on pioneering African American chemist

... Entitled "Forgotten Genius," the film, in the words of Jim Shoffner, Ph.D., a former member of the Board of Directors of the American Chemical Society, honors a man who "was an inspirational and motivational figure for many young men and women. Although this was...

Consumer-driven health plans slow to catch on, 2nd annual survey finds

... The second annual EBRI-Commonwealth Fund Consumerism in Health Care Survey also finds that, despite the expectations of some polic...

Consumers neutral on risks, benefits of nano

... The study, which was conducted by researchers at Rice University's Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN), Uni...

RAND study shows little public money spent on health care to undocumented immigrants

... ... The report which appears in the November edition of the journal Health Affairs estimates that in the United States about $1.1 billion in federal, state and...

Minorities, uninsured less likely to receive care at high-volume hospitals

... Efforts to improve the quality of surgical care in the United States have led many organizations to advocate the use of high-volume hospitals for certain procedures, since a number of studies have reported of a direct volume-outcome relationship for certain procedures, with patients at high-volume hospitals consistently h...

Olive Leaf report documents promising therapeutic interventions for 9-11 workers

... More than 2400 chemicals and metals were combusted when the twin towers collapsed. The major ones identified as being potentially toxic to humans wer...

MetOp launch campaign resumed

... MetOp's planned launch from Baikonur on a Soyuz/ST launcher, originally planned for 17 July, had to be called off after three consecutive attempts because of technical issues relating to the Soyuz's ground system. However, the problems have now been solved and a review of the overall ground system validation process is now underway. In addition, the Soyuz launcher has been completely refurbi...

Wiley to assume publication of Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine

... Published continuously since 1934 by The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine is issued six times a year and features clinical articles from all medical disciplines. Wiley will re-launch the journal as Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine: A Journal of Translat...

Effect of direct-to-consumer drug ads unexpected

Television ads for prescription drugs are everywhere, enticing people to ask their doctors for this drug or that one, but the effect this type of ad has on American healthcare may be more complicated than simply inducing patients to choose one brand or the other, according to a team of researchers.... "Up until 1997, manufacturers could not say both the product's name and what it was used for,...

IOS Press presents commemorative volume on Alzheimer's Disease to her majesty, Queen Sofia of Spain

... Khalid Iqbal, one of the conveners of the conference, makes the presentation to Queen Sofia. Left to right ar...

NOVA documentary honors pioneering African American chemist Percy Julian

... One of the sessions at the symposium -- "Dr. Percy L. Julian Scientist, Humanist, Educator, Entrepreneur, and Inspirational Trailblazer" -- will offer a sneak preview of the documentary, which is entitled, "Forgotten...

Consumer hygiene fears keep food industry on its toes

... A report from the Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation (CARR) says that an education campaign following the 1996 outbreak raised the profile of food safety and hygiene and brought home the importance of environmental health officers (EHOs) and the human costs of poor practices. Survey data also s...

Low birth weight babies with reduced occipital regional volumes at higher risk for visual impairment

... Thirty-five percent of the infants were later found to have abnormal oculomotor control, including impa...

Call for data on reuse of surgical instruments to allay fears over vCJD transmission

A study published today in the online edition of the Journal of the Royal Society Interface has been exploring the likelihood that vCJD might be spread via the reuse of surgical instruments, and calls for more data in order to allay fears over the possible transmission of vCJD.... The number of vCJD cases continues to decline, and it is believed that most cases to date are the result of consumpt...

Surgical instruments may not be fair trade

... ... Dr Bhutta says that while NHS suppliers are encouraged to act in an ethical business manner, they do not and there are currently no checks or assessments made int...

Research documents children's exposure to pesticides, suggests need for family education

... In the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine report that urine samples from 60 children revealed higher levels of pesticide exposure than had been found in similar studies elsewhere. And, in Health Education & Behavior, they conclude that workers' spouses need more education to protec...

New study predicts child injuries by consumer fireworks

... ... An estimated 85,800 pediatric (19 years and you...

IADR and GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare announce winners of 2006 Innovation in Oral Care Awards

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare today announced the 2006 winners of the annual IADR/GSK Innovation in Oral Care Awards. The three winners will be recognized during the 84th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, held in Brisbane, Australia, June 28 July 1, 2006. Sharing the $225,000 unrestricted research grant, which is funded b...

Study documents outbreak of fungal eye infections among contact lens wearers in Singapore

Researchers in Singapore have reported an outbreak of Fusarium keratitis (a fungal infection of the cornea) associated with soft contact lens wear and linked with use of certain contact lens cleaning solutions, according to an article in the June 28 issue of JAMA. ...... Keratitis, an inflammation of the cornea, is a potentially blinding infection and is one of the most severe complications assoc...

New study adds weight to argument for steroid injections in patients with hip osteoarthritis

New evidence, presented on Saturday (24 June) at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, suggests significant benefits for patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) when receiving intraarticular (IA) steroid treatment. The treatment had earlier been labeled by EULAR as having low evidence of its effectiveness, but has been included in the committee's recommendation guidelines as an option for h...

The ESC releases guidance document on Cardiac Rhythm Management product performance

Sophia Antipolis, France- There are significant differences between European Union countries and non-EU countries when it comes to reporting about Cardiac Rhythm Management (CRM) device technology, performance and adverse events and these differences can cause problems for the general public if steps are not taken to minimize them, according to the results of a policy conference held by the ESC's...

Underage drinkers account for about 17 percent of consumer expenditures for alcohol

Underage drinking contributes an estimated $23 billion yearly to the alcohol industry, more than 17 percent of the total consumer expenditures for alcohol, according to an article in the May issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals....... In 1998, alcohol abuse and alcoholism cost the U.S. $184 billion, more than cancer ($107 billion) or obesity ($1...

LSUHSC public health documents unmet health needs of Katrina-displaced

New Orleans Working with Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, a group of students from LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans' School of Public Health found a host of under or untreated medical and mental health conditions affecting adults and children living in FEMA-subsidized housing units (trailers and hotel rooms) in Louisiana. On the Edge: Children and Families Displaced...

Numerical processing similar in children and adults, brain scans reveal

DURHAM, N.C. -- Four-year-olds who are still developing numerical abilities show activity in the same brain region during numerical tasks as do math-adept adults, Duke University researchers have found. Their comparative brain scan studies are the first to explore the earliest glimmerings of numerical processing in pre-school children....... The researchers said their findings represent the begin...

Watch not, want not? Packard/Stanford study links kids' TV time and consumerism

STANFORD, Calif. - Peace at any price? More than one parent has forked over cash in a desperate bid to stop their kids' badgering for the hottest toy or the latest snack. Now researchers at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and Stanford's School of Medicine have found that the more time California third-graders spent in front of the tube or playing video games, the more often they asked an adult...

Should we ban consumer drug ads? - Press release from PLoS Medicine

Is advertising medicines to consumers harmful or helpful?...... The US and New Zealand are the only industrialized countries that allow direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs, although New Zealand is planning a ban. Is it time for the US to also ban the practice? In a debate in the open access medical journal PLoS Medicine, authors with divergent viewpoints lay out the poss...

Penn study shows smokers assume false sense of safety from ads for low nicotine Quest cigarettes

A study by researchers at the Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found that many smokers make false inferences about the safety of new low nicotine Quest cigarettes. This research appears in the March issue of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors....... "This study is the first to evaluate how regular smokers responded to a print ad fo...

AstraZeneca, University of Miami, and Humana collaborate to improve consumer health

AstraZeneca, the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine and Humana Innovation Enterprises, Inc. announced today the creation of a multi-year research collaboration to improve consumer health by addressing the growing nationwide problem of patients not taking their prescribed medication or getting the treatment they need for chronic health problems. ...... The problem of medicat...

Citizen consumers? Using public services is not like shopping

The government's new white paper on health seems to suggest that patients should be offered more choice. However, visiting the doctor or phoning the police is simply not like shopping, according to people questioned for a new study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), which found that most of us reject the trend towards treating everyone as 'consumers'....... We see public...

Hospital volume doesn't explain racial disparity in cardiovascular procedure deaths

Although hospitals that perform fewer cardiovascular procedures tend to have higher death rates than higher-volume hospitals, and although African-American and Hispanic patients tend to be treated at lower-volume hospitals, differences in volume do not explain racial disparities in cardiovascular procedure death rates, according to a new study in the Jan. 17, 2006, issue of the Journal of the Ame...

Reduced brain volume may predict dementia in healthy elderly people

Reduced volume, or atrophy, in parts of the brain known as the amygdala and hippocampus may predict which cognitively healthy elderly people will develop dementia over a six-year period, according to a study in the January issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.... ...New strategies may be able to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most...

Monumental measurement of mortality

The world's largest prospective study on mortality, in which a staff of a thousand are monitoring 14 million people in 2.4 million representative households, is currently underway in India. As described in the open access journal PLoS Medicine, the study will ascertain the causes of one million deaths expected to occur among these people in the period between 1998 and 2014. Three quarters of the...

Physicians: Simple 'instrument' allows medical staff to check patients' literacy

Health-care providers soon will have access to a new tool designed to assess patients' health literacy skills quickly and simply, thanks to medical school researchers at the universities of Arizona and North Carolina at Chapel Hill.... ...Knowing for sure if patients can understand health information enables doctors and nurses, for example, to boost how well patients fare.... ...Dr. Barry D. Weis...

Older consumers prefer emotional appeals

A growing body of research on older consumers reveals that as we grow older we become more emotional. This emotion often causes susceptibility to misleading advertising. But in a forthcoming article in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California--Los Angeles explore age-based reactions to advertising appeals and found that, in...

1.7m to build world's first SIMS instrument combined with infra-red spectroscopy

The University of Manchester has been awarded 1.7m to build a new instrument which will for the first time combine ToF-SIMS and infrared spectroscopy opening up new possibilities in the study biological, organic and inorganic materials....... The capabilities of the instrument, which is expected to be built within two years, will be tested on materials such as prostate cancer tissue and environme...
(Date:4/22/2014)... Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the ... week report that they have discovered a new genus ... the Negro River in the Amazonia State of Brazil. ... Adlia Nogueira and Jos Antnio Alves-Gomes of INPA, describe ... the journal Proceedings of the Natural Sciences of ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... at the University of Kentucky has discovered new methods ... , The research, led by Peixuan Guo, professor ... the UK College of Pharmacy and Markey Cancer Center, ... Boiling-Resistant Anionic Polymer Material To Build Robust Structures with ... and Daniel L. Jasinski. , The article, which will ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... trip to Asia to coordinate with allies and ... at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) emphasized ... as an example of strong and growing ties ... the region. , The APTEP program, centered in ... the development of alternative energy technologies. It takes ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New electric fish genus and species discovered in Brazil's Rio Negro 2RNA shows potential as boiling-resistant anionic polymer material for nanoarchitectures 2Full power: Alternative energy partnerships flourish in Asia 2Full power: Alternative energy partnerships flourish in Asia 3
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