Tag: "vol" at medical news

HealthGrades study: Bariatric surgery patients have fewer complications at high-volume hospitals

... A c...

Africa: International volunteer impact small, but significant

... Geert Laleman and colleagues from the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium quizzed human resource managers from 13 organisations sending volunteers to sub-Saharan Africa, and eight African medical officers with not-for-profit sector experience. In 2005 international health vo...

European Space Agency's Envisat captures breath of volcano

... Officials raised the alert to the highest level on Tuesday after the volcano, located in the eastern province of North Maluku, started spitting out flaming material, indicating magma was approaching the craters surface making an eruption more likely, Saut Simatupang of Indonesia's Vulcanological Survey told Reuters ne...

Patients with soft tissue sarcomas should be treated at high volume centers

... ... Using an analysis of a la...

Stanford scientists identify protein involved in fast-spreading cancers

STANFORD, Calif. - Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found a protein that may explain why tumors in a low-oxygen environment are more deadly. ... ...The findings, to be published April 27 in the journal Nature, reveal that tumors that are hypoxic - low in oxygen - make a protein called lysyl oxidase that helps the tumor spread to other organs. Lysyl oxidase, or...

Alien soundscapes, crackling jets, stalking volcanoes

... Even if you are not able to be in Salt Lake City, the detailed descriptions in the papers, along with speaker contact information and supplemental visuals and sound files, will enable you to cover many of the meeting's stories. None of the highlighted papers are embargoed, so you are...

Community-associated staph infections involving antibiotic-resistant bacteria increase

... Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections-which do not respond to standard antibiotic treatments-are typically associated with hospitals and other health care environments. Beginning in 1998, a community-associated form of t...

SCAI's 'Therapies in Evolution' showcases exciting future of interventional cardiology

... "These therapies are in their infancy," said Ted Feldman, M.D., FSCAI, director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory...

Major employers, physicians, stakeholders unite to revolutionize America's healthcare system

... ...

More research needed to involve families in psychosocial interventions

... Prior studies have found that supportive and non-supportive actions by family members are linked with a patients emotional well-being,...

Plasmonics book gives overview of technology that could revolutionize computing

... ... In it Dr Maier, a member of the Centre for Photonics and Photonic Materials in the University's Department of Physics, describes the basics of plasmonics, in which light signals are sent down the surfaces of small metallic nanostructures.</p...

A revolution in the monitoring of unborn babies

... It took 15 years of pioneering work and enterprise, with funding from Action Medical Research and Venture Capital, to develop the fetal heart monitor....

Revolutionizing prosthetics 2009 team delivers first DARPA limb prototype

An international team led by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., has developed a prototype of the first fully integrated prosthetic arm that can be controlled naturally and provide sensory feedback, and allows for eight degrees of ...Freedom -- a level of control far beyond the current state of the art for prosthetic limbs. ... Proto 1, developed for the De...

New device could revolutionize eye disease diagnosis -- creating eye maps on the high street

... Ophthalmoscopes, which act as an illuminated microscope for the eye, have changed little in design in the last century. As a result the effective operation of the device is constrained by the skill, expertise and eyes...

Brain studies reveal the mechanisms of the voluntary control of visual attention

... ... "There are a number of clinical syndromes where attention is dysfunctional, including schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit-hyperact...

Drug improves tremors, involuntary movements in Parkinson patients

... The three-month, multi-center study in Japan involved 279 Parkinson disease patients who weren't responding well to the commonly used drug, levodopa, to manage their symptoms. The patients were divided into groups that took 25, 50 or 100 mg a day of...

Neurons targeted by dementing illness may have evolved for complex social cognition

Von Economo neurons (VENs) are uniquely shaped brain cells that seem to have evolved in a select group of socially complex species: great apes, humans, and, as reported last month, whales. Across species, VENs are localized to frontal brain regions associated with cognition, emotion and social behavior. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a common neurodegenerative condition, is characterized by ear...

Involvement of the amygdala in systemic lupus erythematosus

In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-NMDA receptor antibodies have been shown to gain access to the brain during stress, specifically damaging the amygdala (a part of the brain that is involved in emotion) and causing altered emotional responses. In a paper published in PLoS Medicine from Leiden University Medical Center of 37 patients with neuropsychiatric SLE, 21 patien...

Ultrasound mammography, volcano monitoring for aircraft safety

... These and other questions will be addressed at the Fourth Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) and the Acoustical Society of Japan (ASJ), which will take place from November 28-December 2, 2006 at...

Minorities, uninsured less likely to receive care at high-volume hospitals

... Efforts to improve the quality of surgical care in the United States have led many organizations to advocate the use of high-volume hospitals for certain procedures, since a number of studies have reported of a direct volume-outcome relationship for certain procedures, with patients at high-volume hospitals consistently h...

IOS Press presents commemorative volume on Alzheimer's Disease to her majesty, Queen Sofia of Spain

... Khalid Iqbal, one of the conveners of the conference, makes the presentation to Queen Sofia. Left to right ar...

Low birth weight babies with reduced occipital regional volumes at higher risk for visual impairment

... Thirty-five percent of the infants were later found to have abnormal oculomotor control, including impa...

Voluntary household interventions can reduce death and disease burden from pandemic influenza

... Joseph Wu and colleagues (from the University of Hong Kong) developed a mathematical model to simulate the course of pandemic influenza in a typical city population and now report their results i...

Prescription pain killers involved in more drug overdose deaths than cocaine or heroin in the US

... Drugs called "opioids" are frequently prescribed to relieve pain, but if abused they can kill. Over the past 15 years, sales of opioid pain killers, includ...

Institute of Medicine advisory: Research involving prisoners

Most scientific research involving prisoners now takes place outside the scope of federal regulations and often without the scrutiny of institutional review boards. Ethical considerations for research involving prisoners, a new report from the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, says more comprehensive safeguards and oversight measures are needed to ensure that such studies meet the...

Study finds greater religious involvement associated with lower mortality risk

Social relationships that tend to thrive in church settings can have a positive affect on an older person's longevity, according to the latest issue of The Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences (Vol. 61B, No. 3). Specifically, the impact of stress on mortality is reduced when church-goers provide support to those they worship with....... Previous research has suggested that greater involvement...

Biologic therapies lead evolution of Crohn's treatments

LOS ANGELES (May 22, 2006) A variety of diseases are now treated with biologic therapies, which are derived from human tissues, because of their ability to target specific causes of inflammation compared with the general immunosuppressive effects of the chemical-based compounds that make up current therapies. In research presented today at Digestive Disease Week 2006 (DDW), several biologic th...

T cell 'brakes' lost during human evolution

A significant difference between human and chimpanzee immune cells may provide clues in the search to understand the diverse array of human immune-related diseases. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine have uncovered a a specific type of molecule expressed on non-human primate T cells, but not human T cells. T cells are important orchestrators of the...

Lizard 'third eye' sheds light on evolution of color vision

Johns Hopkins Medicine...Media Relations and Public Affairs...Media Contact: Audrey Huang...410-614-5105; audrey@jhmi.edu ...April 13, 2006......Published in the March 17 issue of Science, their lizard study describes how the "side-blotched" lizard's so-called third, or parietal, eye, distinguishes two different colors, blue and green, possibly to tell the time of day. Specialized nerve cells in...

National Academies advisory: Genomics Revolution Conference summary

Last November the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative held a conference at which researchers from many fields gathered to participate in a series of working groups to develop new methods to identify, diagnose and treat infectious disease using biotechnology and genomics. THE GENOMICS REVOLUTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT AND CONTROL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE, a summary of the conference, ex...

Vol. 42, No. 5 JRRD tipsheet: Focus on spinal cord injury and prosthetics

The current issue of the Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development (JRRD) includes eight articles on spinal cord injury--addressing topics such as bone mineral density, women's sexuality, and chronic pain--and three articles on prosthetics research. Other articles in this issue focus on robotic therapy for stroke rehabilitation, the diabetic foot, and vocational rehabilitation for patien...

ABIM to recognize CMS Physician Voluntary Reporting Program measures

In an effort to reduce the burden faced by internists challenged to measure and report performance data, the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and American College of Physicians (ACP) announced today that ABIM will allow internists and subspecialists in internal medicine who are enrolled in ABIM's Maintenance of Certification program to use performance data, provided by the Centers for M...

Ebola DNA vaccine produces immune responses in all fully vaccinated volunteers in Phase 1 trial

Vical Incorporated (Nasdaq:VICL) announced today that an Ebola vaccine candidate administered using Vical's proprietary DNA delivery technology was safe and well tolerated, and produced both antibody and T-cell Ebola-specific responses in all healthy volunteers who received the full 3 doses of vaccine....... The Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study, the first human trial...

Brain researchers discover the evolutionary traces of grammar

Researchers found that simple language structures are processed in an area that is phylogenetically older, and which apes also possess. Complicated structures, by contrast, activate processes in a comparatively younger area which only exists in a more highly evolved species: humans. These results are fundamental to furthering our understanding of the human language faculty. (PNAS, February 6, 200...

Rise in sudden infant death syndrome cases involving infants that sleep with parent on a sofa

The number of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases that occur when a parent sleeps with their infant on a sofa has increased in recent years, according to a paper published online today (Wednesday January 18, 2006) by The Lancet. The authors strongly recommend that parents avoid this sleeping environment. ...... The risk of SIDS is higher for male, pre-term, and low birthweight infants, and...

Hospital volume doesn't explain racial disparity in cardiovascular procedure deaths

Although hospitals that perform fewer cardiovascular procedures tend to have higher death rates than higher-volume hospitals, and although African-American and Hispanic patients tend to be treated at lower-volume hospitals, differences in volume do not explain racial disparities in cardiovascular procedure death rates, according to a new study in the Jan. 17, 2006, issue of the Journal of the Ame...

Reduced brain volume may predict dementia in healthy elderly people

Reduced volume, or atrophy, in parts of the brain known as the amygdala and hippocampus may predict which cognitively healthy elderly people will develop dementia over a six-year period, according to a study in the January issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.... ...New strategies may be able to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most...

Software might revolutionize glucose monitoring in critically ill patients

Researchers have developed a new computerized system to easily...monitor the levels of glucose in the blood of patients in intensive...care. A study published today in the open access journal BMC Medical...Informatics and Decision Making reports that GRIP, a computer...software that assists in the monitoring of glucose levels in...critically ill patients, saves nurses time and effort and is more....

Researchers identify key protein involved in neuropathic pain

A team of researchers led by Universit Laval and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) has discovered a protein that plays a major role in neuropathic pain. This discovery, published in the December 16 issue of Nature, paves the way for the development of new diagnostics and treatments for chronic pain. ... ...Neuropathic pain is a common and severely disabling state that affects millions of...

Large-scale study proves volunteer operated defibrillators are life-savers

The first large-scale study to see whether trained volunteers and lay people can use defibrillators to save the lives of cardiac arrest (CA) victims has concluded that their use by lay people is safe, and if the response time can be shortened to within eight minutes there is the potential to save the lives of 15 out of 100 people who collapse suddenly with CA....... Brescia in Italy a large mixe...
(Date:7/24/2014)... N.J. A yearlong study funded by the New ... Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy ... in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of ... survey respondents, 45 percent indicated they were "pessimistic" or ... by Superstorm Sandy would be rebuilt better than they ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... team of researchers led by the University of York ... conservation in the Western Indian Ocean. , The ... point to a revolution in the management of marine ... more than 11,000 km in the region now ... are zones of the seas and coasts designed to ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... on his work with a new drug that successfully treated ... Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his research ... to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases., Chandra Mohan, ... Engineering at UH, previously published a study in Arthritis Research ... successfully treated lupus in mice and reduced the number of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Rutgers study explores attitudes, preferences toward post-Sandy rebuilding 2Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation 2Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug 2Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug 3
Other Tags
deliriumprowesslymehemochromatosisemlsymposiakeynotersbottleawardsgeriatricpathologysciencesriskssurgicalreducingpromise